Introducing the theme voices of the revolution
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Introducing the Theme: Voices of the Revolution. Let’s read from your reading book on pg. 255. What is the overall meaning of the three quotes? Who do you think are some voices of the revolution? Why do you think people revolt?

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Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Introducing the Theme: Voices of the Revolution

Let’s read from your reading book on pg. 255.

What is the overall meaning of the three quotes?

Who do you think are some voices of the revolution?

Why do you think people revolt?

What do you think the flame in Abigail Adam’s quotation symbolizes?


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?

Mrs. Williams

Fifth Grade


Samuel adams the father of american independence

Samuel Adams “The Father of American Independence”

Theme 3, Week 3,

Teacher Read Aloud


Activate prior knowledge

Activate Prior Knowledge

  • We are going to read aloud a story about Samuel Adams, a key figure in the American Revolution.

  • Samuel Adams lived in Boston, Massachusetts, in the 1700s, when Massachusetts was a British colony.


Author s viewpoint

Author’s Viewpoint

  • As we read, pay attention to clues about the author’s viewpoint of Samuel Adams.


While you read

While You Read

  • How does the author show how he feels about Samuel Adam’s role in the American Revolution?


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

While You Read

  • 2. What facts show you that the author thinks Samuel Adams was a very important figure in the Revolution?


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

While You Read

  • 3.Why does the author tell what the British and the colonists called Samuel Adams?


Samuel adams the father of american independence1

Samuel Adams “The Father of American Independence”

  • What do you think about Samuel Adams?

  • Was he a great man? Why do they think that?


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

cargo

  • n.  , pl. cargoes. The freight carried by a ship or other vehicle. The ship's cargo included molasses from the West Indies. 


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

colonies

  • n., pl.  colonies.  A territory ruled by or belonging to another country. The thirteen colonies no longer wanted to be taxed by England. 


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

express

  • adj.  Fast, direct, and often nonstop. Express services promise overnight deliveries. 


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

liberty

  • n.  Freedom from the control of others; independence. The colonists won their liberty from England.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

oppose

  • v.  To be against something or someone. The neighbors oppose the plan to turn the park into an office building.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

Patriot

  • n.  A colonist who was against British rule in the time of the Revolutionary War. Patrick Henry spoke as a Patriot when he said, "Give me liberty or give me death!" 


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

revolution

  • adj.  Connected with complete change. The American colonists fought for their independence from England during the Revolutionary War. 


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

sentries

  • n., pl.  sentries.  A guard who is posted at a spot to keep watch. Two sentries guarded the gates of the city. 


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

taxes

  • n.  Money that people must pay in order to support a government. England insisted that the colonists pay taxes on tea, stamps, and many other items. 


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Judge, in your own words!


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.

The author’s viewpoint is that doing the right thing is more important than peer pressure or trying to fit in with certain friends.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.

The author’s viewpoint is that the color of someone’s skin doesn’t matter, it’s what’s in the inside that counts.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.

“In Boston there was always plenty to see.”

“You would think that with all Paul Revere did, he would make mistakes. He always remembered to put spouts on his teapots. ..”

“He was back in Boston on the eleventh day, long before anyone expected him.”

“He did not stop to think that this might be the first battle of a war. His job was to move a truck to safety, and that’s what he did.”


Possessives

Possessives

Once he built a barn on a neighbor’s property.

  • Singular noun: add an apostrophe and an –s (‘s) a girl’s hat

  • Plural noun ending in –s: add an apostrophe. the boys’ dog

  • Plural noun that does not end in an –s: add an apostrophe and an –s (‘s). children’s toys

(R05-S1C4-PO6) We can identify possessives and contractions in a sentence by writing then and discussing with a partner.


Possessives1

Possessives

Using your white board identify the possessive phrase:

  • a man’s pet squirrel

  • printers’ colors

  • the children’s hospital

  • the painters’ brushes

  • The people’s donations

pet squirrel of the man

colors of printers

the hospital for children

the brushes of the painters

donations from the people

(R05-S1C4-PO6) We can identify possessives and contractions in a sentence by writing then and discussing with a partner.


Contractions

Contractions

The colonists didn’t like English laws.

  • didn’t is a contraction of the words did not and the apostrophe stands for the missing o in not.

(R05-S1C4-PO6) We can identify possessives and contractions in a sentence by writing then and discussing with a partner.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Contractions

Using your white board identify the two words that make up the contraction:

wasn’t

they’d

let’s

they’re

we’ll

she’d

(R05-S1C4-PO6) We can identify possessives and contractions in a sentence by writing then and discussing with a partner.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Day 2


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

cargo


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

colonies


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

express


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

liberty


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

oppose


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

Patriot


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

revolution


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

sentries


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

taxes


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?

(R5-S2C1-PO1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9) We can analyze and infer a characters traits and actions by answering questions.

With your shoulder partner, discuss and answer in complete sentences,questions 1-7 on page 280 of your text. You may look back in your text if you need to. When you're finished begin thinking about the following questions.

Which of Paul Revere’s jobs do you think is the most interesting? Explain why.

Do you think the Sons of Liberty were right to dump the tea in Boston Harbor? Why or why not?

Do you think you would have enjoyed living in Boston during Paul Revere’s lifetime? Why?

What do you think it would have been like to be one of Paul Revere’s children?


Author s viewpoint te 265

Author’s ViewpointTE 265

Use the following clues to infer an author’s viewpoint:

  • The author’s opinions

  • The words that the author chooses

  • The facts that the author includes

  • The author’s purpose for writing

  • Reread pg. 265. What is the author’s purpose for writing this?

  • What clues helped you identify the author’s purpose?

  • What is the author’s viewpoint toward Paul Revere and explain which clues led you to this conclusion?

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Synonyms

Words with the same or nearly the same meaning are called synonyms.

uneasy and nervous

road and street

warn and caution

(RE05-S01-C04-06) We can identify synonyms and determine which synonyms enhance our writing by constructing sentences and sharing them with a partner.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Synonyms

Rewrite these sentences replacing the underlined word with a synonym.

  • Instead he patrolled the streets at night, delivered his messages to Philadelphia, and kept himself ready at all times.

  • He felt uneasy to be on a moonlit road on foot.

    Synonyms: path, prepared, carried, watched, nervous.

(RE05-S01-C04-06) We can identify synonyms and determine which synonyms enhance our writing by constructing sentences and sharing them with a partner.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(R05-S1C4-PO6) We can identify possessives and contractions in a sentence by writing then and discussing with a partner.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Day 3


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

cargo

  • We watched the ______________ get unloaded from the plane before we could aboard.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

  • The United States was once made up of thirteen _____________.

colonies


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

express

  • FedEx offers _____________ service for packages you want to send.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

  • When she turned eighteen and moved out, she had _____________ from her parents.

liberty


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

opposed

  • Many are _______________ to off shore oil drilling.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

patriot

  • A ______________ is someone who supports their country.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

revolution

  • During the __________________ a war between England and the United States was occurring.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

sentries

  • Two ____________ guarded the tomb of the Unknown Soldier.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

taxes

  • Some of our ____________ go to road construction and education.


Author s viewpoint1

Author’s Viewpoint

  • An author writes for many reasons. An author may give you facts or true information about a subject. Some authors write fiction stories or stories that are not true. They write these stories to entertain you. Other authors may write to persuade or to try to get you to do something.

    Directions: READ EACH OF THE FOLLOWING WRITINGS AND DECIDE WHETHER THE AUTHOR'S PURPOSE IS TO:

  • persuade

  • inform

  • entertain

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

1. It was a glorious morning in Alabama. The sun was shining through the trees. Alan couldn't wait to find his fishing pole and call his friend Sam to go fishing. They had a great time on these early morning fishing trips. They took their dogs with them and the dogs would swim in the lake while they fished. It was so funny to watch those dogs paddle around the lake.

  • What is the author's purpose of this writing? ____________________________

    persuade, inform, or entertain?

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

  • 2. The Slim-O-Matic will cause you to loose pounds and inches from your body in one month. This amazing machine helps you to exercise correctly and provides an easy video to show you the proper way to exercise. Send $75.99 and begin exercising today.

  • What is the author's purpose of this writing? ____________________________

    persuade, inform, or entertain?

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

  • 3. The Underground Railroad was a secret organization which helped slaves escape to freedom. Many slaves were able to escape because of the conductors and station masters. The northern states were free states and slaves were free once they arrived in the north. Secret codes and signals were used to identify the conductors and station masters.

  • What is the author's purpose of this writing? ____________________________

    persuade, inform, or entertain?

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Extreme Partner Reading

  • (R5-S1C5-PO1) We can read with fluency and appropriate rhythm, pacing, and expression by choral reading.

You are going to be working in your groups to take the Selection Test.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Author’s Viewpoint

  • Now you are going to work in your groups to decide if the author wrote to:

  • persuade

  • inform

  • entertain

(RE05-S03-C03-01) We can determine an author's position regarding a particular idea, subject, concept, or object, by highlighting supporting evidence from the text.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

  • A present tense verb and its subject must agree in number.

  • Add –s or –es to most verbs if the subject is singular.

  • Do not add –s or –es if the subject is plural or I or you.

  • You’re going to be changing each singular subject to plural, each plural subject to singular, and each verb as needed to agree with its subject.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(R5-S1C4-PO5) We can create sentences that have subject-verb agreement by changing singular subjects to plural and plural subjects to singular.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Day 5: Friday


Paul revere s ride

Paul Revere’s Ride

  • Take out your Social Studies Book and open up to page 288.

  • We are going to read “Paul Revere’s Ride” and Chapter 8: The Colonies Unite

  • Answer “Review” questions 1-4 on a sheet of paper, working in pairs at your table.

  • Complete “Fighting for Control” sheet with your table group (you may look back in your social studies book.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

The trucks cargo …


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

The thirteen colonies . . .


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

She wanted it to be delivered express . . .


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

We won our liberty . . .


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

I am opposed to . . .


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

He was a patriot of our country for . . .


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

The revolution was caused by . . .


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

The sentries guarded . . .


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

S1C4PO2, 04 We are acquiring and using new vocabulary for speaking and reading.

I wish my taxes went towards . . .


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Watch “And then what happened Paul Revere?” from Discovery Education.

After the movie you may use your reading book and complete the reading test with your group. Make sure you put the page number where you found the answer next to each question.

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=321B06A1-6C49-4395-BE7D-3A90F7E160C1&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(R5-S1C4-PO5)We can determine the past or present tense of regular and irregular verbs by creating sentences and sharing them with a partner.

  • The past tense of regular verbs is formed by adding –ed

  • Irregular verbs have special forms to show the past tense. Do not add –ed!

  • Let’s correct some sentences together.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(R5-S1C4-PO5)We can determine the past or present tense of regular and irregular verbs by creating sentences and sharing them with a partner.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

When You Are Finished

After you finish your Weekly Skills Test:

  • Make sure your name, date, and assignment are written clearly on the top left of the paper.

  • Turn your test paper to me and put your answer key in the reading basket.

  • Finish your Mountain Language and work on the Reading Menu.

  • Read a book of your choice.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Day 5


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Yankee Doodle

  • With your partner, read pages 282-285 from your text using the skills mentions in the yellow column on the left of page 282. When you are finished discuss these questions with your partner.

Why was being a fifer or drummer a dangerous job during the American Revolution?

Why might a British soldier have wanted to call a Patriot a “Yankee Doodle”?

How did the British use of “Yankee Doodle” benefit the Minutemen during the battle of Lexington?

Compare Paul Revere’s big ride to the word done by the fifers and drummers. How are they alike? How are they different?


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

(RE05-S01-C04-06) We can identify synonyms and determine which synonyms enhance our writing by constructing sentences and sharing them with a partner.


Extras

Extras


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Paul Revere Vocabulary

  • cargo

  • The freight carried by a ship or other vehicle.

  • colonies

  • A territory ruled by or belonging to another country.

  • express

    • Fast, direct, and often nonstop.

  • liberty

  • Freedom from the control of others; independence.

  • oppose

    • To be against something or someone.

    • Patriot

    • A colonist who was against British rule in the time of the Revolutionary War.

    • revolution

    • Connected with complete change.

    • sentries

    • A guard who is posted at a spot to keep watch.

    • taxes

    • Money that people must pay in order to support a government.


Let me tell it my way

Let Me Tell It My Way

Point of View

And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? Is written from third-person point of view with the narrator telling the events of Paul Revere’s life. Choose a favorite scene from the story and rewrite it from Paul Revere’s point of view.

  • Make a list of the main events in your scene.

  • Think about what it would have been like to be Paul Revere living through the events.

  • Remember to use the words I, me, and my to refer to what Paul Revere says and does.


Introducing the theme voices of the revolution

Cause and Effect

Using a Multi-Flow Map, choose an important event in the story and give three actual or possible causes and effects of that event.


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