World AIDS Day 2014
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World aids day 2014 learning about hiv and challenging hiv stigma and discrimination

World AIDS Day 2014

Learning about HIV and challenging HIV-stigma and discrimination


World aids day 2014

World AIDS Day 2014

What is World AIDS Day?

World AIDS Day (WAD) is observed on 1st December every year to help raise awareness about HIV. It is a day to show support for people living with HIV, remember those who have lost their lives because of HIV, and learn the facts and realities of HIV in the UK today.


What do we know about hiv

What do we know about HIV?

What is HIV?

  • HIV is a virus that attacks the body's immune system. It stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

  • AIDS can develop when HIV damages the immune system to such an extent that it can no longer fight off a range of infections it would normally cope with.


What do we know about hiv1

What do we know about HIV?

Who gets HIV?

  • Anyone can potentially contract HIV if they put themselves at risk.

  • The most common way HIV is transmitted in the UK is through sex without condoms. Condoms with lubrication are very effective at preventing the transmission of HIV.

  • In the UK the groups most affected by HIV are gay and bisexual men and black African men and women.

  • Some young people will have lived with HIV their whole life because HIV can be passed on during pregnancy, birth or breast feeding. However, in the UK this is now very rare because HIV medication is used to prevent this from happening.


What do we know about hiv2

What do we know about HIV?

What is life like with HIV?

  • If diagnosed in good time, and with the right medication, people living with HIV can now live as long as anyone else and will be unlikely to develop AIDS.

  • With the right medication, people living with HIV are very unlikely to pass on the virus to anyone else.

  • In the UK, people living with HIV can do any job, apart from serving on the ‘front-line’ in the armed forces. This is the same for many other long-term conditions which require you to take daily medication.


World aids day 2014 learning about hiv and challenging hiv stigma and discrimination

Some HIV statistics

  • Around 100,000 people are living with HIV in the UK.

  • One in five people living with HIV in the UK do not know they have the virus.

  • Just under half of adults who get HIV are diagnosed late. Late diagnoses can cause complications and even shorten your life expectancy.


Myth busting

Myth Busting

HIV myths


Myth busting1

Myth Busting

How is HIV passed on?

“You can get HIV through sharing toothbrushes, kissing, or touching.”

Why is this untrue?

Because: HIV is only passed on through bodily fluids exchanged through sex, and blood and breast milk. There is absolutely no risk of contracting HIV through sharing toothbrushes, kissing or touching because HIV cannot be passed on through saliva or casual day-to-day contact.


Myth busting2

Myth Busting

How do I protect myself from HIV?

“There is nothing I can do once I’ve been exposed to HIV.”

Why is this untrue?

Because: You can take Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). PEP involves you taking 4 weeks of HIV medication and can prevent HIV infection, if started within 72 hours.


Myth busting3

Myth Busting

Who gets HIV?

“I’m not the ‘type of person’ who gets HIV - I’m not gay.”

Why is this untrue?

Because:Anyone can get HIV if they put themselves at risk.


Myth busting4

Myth Busting

“If you get HIV you will not have much longer to live.”

Why is this untrue?

Because: Whilst HIV is a serious long-term condition, it can now be treated and managed very well. If you are diagnosed in good time and take your medication as prescribed, your quality of life and life expectancy can be just the same as anyone else.

What is life like with HIV?


World aids day 2014 learning about hiv and challenging hiv stigma and discrimination

HIV stigma


Hiv and stigma

HIV and Stigma

  • As a result of myths and poor understanding about HIV, people living with HIV often experience stigma or discrimination.

Myths and poor understanding have real-life consequences.


Hiv and stigma1

HIV and Stigma

Stigma

  • ‘A mark of disgrace associated with a particular circumstance, quality, or person’

    (Oxford English Dictionary)


Hiv and stigma2

HIV and Stigma

Discrimination

  • ‘The unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people, especially on the grounds of race, age, or sex’

    (Oxford English Dictionary)


Hiv and stigma3

HIV and Stigma

What impact do these myths have on Craig, John, and Sarah?


World aids day 2014 learning about hiv and challenging hiv stigma and discrimination

Think about:

  • What we’ve learnt so far about the facts and myths of HIV.

  • Unfair stereotypes people hold about certain groups of people.


Craig

Craig

Craig is a popular and loud boy at school. He mainly has female friends and he likes to discuss fashion with them. The other boys start a rumour that he is gay and he has HIV.

What myths can you identify?

Why is this untrue?

What are the potential consequences ?


World aids day 2014 learning about hiv and challenging hiv stigma and discrimination

John

John is 5 and applying for a new school. His mother informs the head teacher that he is HIV positive. The head teacher is concerned that John could pass on the virus to the other children. She tells John’s mother that he cannot join the school.

What myths can you identify?

Why is this untrue?

What are the potential consequences ?


Sarah

Sarah

Sarah is 17 at college and has recently been diagnosed with HIV. She discloses her status to her careers counsellor. Her careers counsellor tells her there are certain jobs she can no longer do like being a doctor or a nurse.

What myths can you identify?

Why is this untrue?

What are the potential consequences ?


What can you do

What Can You Do?

  • Act Aware – find out the facts and bust the myths. Get clued up at http://www.hivaware.org.uk

  • Don’t Be A Bystander – challenge HIV stigma and discrimination when you hear it.

  • Become an HIV Activist – you can also get involved in campaigns and make a difference. Sign up here:

    http://www.lifewithhiv.org.uk/hiv-activists-network


What can you do1

What Can You Do?

  • Wear a red ribbon to show your support for people living with HIV

  • Attend a World AIDS Day event. Events are listed here: www.worldaidsday.org

  • Do something as a class or school to mark World AIDS Day. For example, a red ribbon collection box, hold an event like a red themed party, or get sponsored to do something for NAT. For fundraising ideas:

    http://www.hivaware.org.uk/fundraising/top-ideas.php

How to mark World AIDS Day 2014


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