Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration
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EDUC 611: Literacy Coaching and Collaboration . Session 1. EDUC 611 Syllabus. EDUC 611 Syllabus. Review course syllabus Required Text Resource Material Course Description Course Guidelines and Requirements Course Objectives Course Assignments

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Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

EDUC 611: Literacy Coaching and Collaboration

Session 1


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

EDUC 611 Syllabus


Educ 611 syllabus

EDUC 611 Syllabus

  • Review course syllabus

    • Required Text

    • Resource Material

    • Course Description

    • Course Guidelines and Requirements

    • Course Objectives

    • Course Assignments

    • Attendance and Late Work

    • Grade Determination

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Course Description


Educ 611 course description

EDUC 611 Course description

  • Refer to page 2 in course syllabus

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Course Objectives


Educ 611 course objectives

EDUC 611 Course Objectives

  • Refer to pages 2 – 3 in course syllabus

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

EDUC 611 Major Assignments


Educ 611 assignments

EDUC 611 Assignments

  • Please refer to your syllabus pages 3 – 5

  • EDUC 611 Major Assignments:

    • Practicum Experience – Interview and Reflection Paper (5 Clock Hours) 75 pts. [DUE Sess. 7]

    • Journal Article & Presentation – 50 pts. [DUE Sess. 3, 5, or 7]

    • Literacy Coaching Reference folder & Reflection Paper

    • Literacy Coaching Lesson – 50 pts. [DUE Sess. 3 or 5]

    • Professional Portfolio Artifact – Literacy Support Survey 250 pts. [DUE Sess. 9]

      • Collaboration Self-Assessment is DUE Session 8

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

SESSION 1 OBJECTIVES


Session 1 objectives

Session 1 objectives

In Session 1, we will:

  • (Discuss?) the creation and importance of two facilitation tools:

  • ‘Group Norms’

  • ‘Parking Lot’

  • Examine the definitions of collaboration, collaborative leader, and relationship management

  • Examine the differences between a Reading Specialist and a Literacy Coach

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

EDUC 611 Textbooks


Literacy coaching the essentials

Literacy Coaching: The Essentials

“This book achieves something which is rare in professional development books. It demonstrates how to integrate core instructional elements into successful practices…It should become a central text for study at the classroom, school, and district level.”

Anthony J. Alvarado

Former Superintendent, District 2, New York & Former Chancellor of Instruction, San Diego City Schools

Benedictine University


The literacy coach s survival guide

The Literacy Coach’s Survival Guide

  • “A literacy coach is one who helps teachers to recognize what they know and can do, assists teachers as they strengthen their ability to make more effective use of what they know and can do, and support teachers as they learn and do more.”

    Cathy A. Toll

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

  • Facilitation Tools:

  • Group Norms

  • Parking Lot


Group norms

Group Norms

Group Norms are:

  • Informal standards of behavior and performancethat develop from the interaction of a group and that the group agrees to adhere to:

    • Both agreed upon behaviorand performance norms apply to all group members

    • The agreed upon group norms are intended to facilitate the groups interactions and performance

Benedictine University


Group norms1

Group Norms

Group Norms:

  • In a group, norms will evolve on their own if nothing purposeful is done to develop them

  • These ad hoc group norms often may be ‘negative’

  • It is better to set norms as a group rather than to allow them to merely evolve on their own

  • When setting group norms it is important to:

    • Ensure that norms are the result of group consensus

    • Ensure that they are not confused with rules

      • Rules are often “handed down” and tend not to be cooperatively set

      • Therefore ‘rules’ are not typically effective as group norms

Benedictine University

Phippes, M. L. & Phipps, C. A.: http://mountainrise.wcu.edu/index.php/MtnRise/article/viewFile/37/86


Group norms2

Group Norms

Group Norms:

  • An effective way to establish Group Norms is to allow time for a group to talk and cooperatively set group norms during the first meeting

  • Three areas to consider setting Group Norms are:

    • “Individual to Individual”

    • “Group to Individual”

    • “Individual to Group”

  • These three areas of Group Norms serve to provide a 360 support structure for healthy interactions of the group from the individual to the group as a whole

Benedictine University


Group norms3

Group Norms

Small Group Norms Activity:

  • Create a draft set of Group Norms for one of three areas

  • The Group Norms you create will be our class behavior/interaction for the next five weeks

  • Divide into 3 small groups

    • Group A: Brainstorm group norms that apply to “Individual to Individual” situations within a group

    • Group B: Brainstorm group norms that apply to “Group to Individual” situations in a group

    • Group C: Brainstorm group norms that apply to “Individual to Group” situations in a group

Benedictine University


Group norms4

Group Norms

Large Group Norms Debrief Activity:

  • What is the importance of Group Norms for each of the three areas, from individuals to whole group?

    • Each small group will orally present their draft Group Norms to the entire class

    • The class will discuss each set of Group Norms

  • The class will then come to a consensus on appropriate and useful Group Norms for each area:

    • Individual to Individual

    • Group to Individual

    • Individual to Group

Benedictine University


Group norm examples

Group Norm Examples

Example of Group Norm Setting done in an Academic Course at California Polytechnic State University

Benedictine University

Phippes, M. L. & Phipps, C. A.: http://mountainrise.wcu.edu/index.php/MtnRise/article/viewFile/37/86


Group norms5

Group Norms

‘Group Norm’ Maintenance:

  • Reviewing group norms each time a group meets and renewing each person’s commitment to them is an important way to make the shift from small talk to big talk for each and every meeting

  • Serve as a reminder and help the group make the transition from our usual chatter to the more reflective pace, tone, and intention for a meeting

Benedictine University


Parking lot

Parking Lot

  • The “parking lot” facilitation approach is used for ongoing communication during a meeting

  • When facilitating professional development, ask/encourage participants to voice questions, concerns or suggestions

  • Use chart paper to jot down questions or issues that cannot be addressed during a session, but are important

  • “Park” (write) ideas, comments, questions that may be off target for the meeting agenda but may be helpful to revisit at a later time

    • This assures that important ideas are not lost and that people feel that their comments are taken seriously

  • The “parking lot” approach serves as a visual reminder of issues to be addressed during future sessions

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Collaboration


Collaboration

Collaboration

  • Collaboration is a process:

    • Collaborative success is not the result of a formula or the product of a structure

    • Collaboration is a process that requires

      • Attention

      • Commitment

      • Work

Benedictine University


Collaboration1

Collaboration

  • Collaboration, at the conceptual level, involves:

    • Awareness - Becoming part of a working entity with a shared purpose

    • Motivation - Driving to gain consensus in problem solving or development

    • Self-synchronization - Deciding as individuals when things need to happen

    • Participation - Participating in collaboration and expecting others to participate

    • Consensus Building - Working together to find a middle point

    • Reciprocity – Mutual sharing

    • Reflection - Thinking and considering alternatives

    • Engagement - Proactively engaging rather than ‘wait and see’

Benedictine University


Collaboration2

Collaboration

  • According to H. Rubin, author of Collaborative Leadership, Developing Effective Partnerships in Communities and Schools

  • Collaborationis a:

    • Purposeful relationship in which all parties strategically choose to cooperate in order to accomplish a shared outcome

    • Because of its voluntary nature, the success of a collaboration depends on one or more of the collaborative leader’s ability to build and maintain these relationships

Rubin, Hank. (2002), Collaborative Leadership, Developing Effective Partnerships in Communities and Schools, Thousand Oak, Calif: Corwin Press, (pp. 17-20)

Benedictine University


Collaboration3

Collaboration

  • Collaborative leadership includes:

    • The purposeful exercise of your behavior, communication, and organizational resources to

      • Affect the perspective, beliefs, and behaviors of another person

      • Influence that person’s relationship with you and your collaborative enterprise

    • The structure and climate of an environment that supports the collaborative relationship

Rubin, Hank. (2002), Collaborative Leadership, Developing Effective Partnerships in Communities and Schools, Thousand Oak, Calif: Corwin Press, (p. 2)

Benedictine University


Collaboration4

Collaboration

  • Relationship Management:

    • Initiates and sustains relationships influencing individuals and institutions

    • Recruits and retains stakeholders and decision makers with diverse missions and goals who find their self-interests are served by collaboration

    • Establishes and maintains a level of productivity in the collaboration that satisfies the collective and individual interests of its members

    • Rubin uses the terms “relationship builder” and “relationship management” as synonyms for collaborative leadership

Rubin, Hank. (2002), Collaborative Leadership, Developing Effective Partnerships in Communities and Schools, Thousand Oak, Calif: Corwin Press, (p. 2)

Benedictine University


Collaboration5

Collaboration

  • An individual is a collaborative leader when he/she accepts responsibility for building and helping to ensure the success of a heterogeneous team to accomplish a shared purpose

  • Collaborative leadership:

    • Is the skillful and mission-oriented facilitation of relevant relationships

    • It is the juncture of organizing and management

    • Builds structures to support and sustain these productive relationships over time

  • Collaborative Leaders succeed with and through people

Rubin, Hank. (2002), Collaborative Leadership, Developing Effective Partnerships in Communities and Schools, Thousand Oak, Calif: Corwin Press, (p. 2 - 3)

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Reading Specialist


Reading specialist

Reading Specialist

The International Reading Association (IRA) defines a Reading Specialist as:

  • An expert in reading instruction, assessment, and leadership for the reading program

  • Holding advanced preparation and experience in reading

  • Responsible for the literacy performance of all readers, in particular those who struggle

Benedictine University

Web Source: http://www.reading.org/General/AboutIRA/PositionStatements/ReadingSpecialistPosition.aspx


Reading specialist1

Reading Specialist

The IRA’s recommendations for the roles of the reading specialist include:

  • Instruction—The reading specialist supports classroom teaching, and works collaboratively to implement a quality reading program

  • Assessment—The reading specialist evaluates the literacy program in general, and can assess the reading strengths and needs of students and communicate these to classroom teachers, parents, and specialized personnel such as psychologists, special educators, or speech teachers

  • Leadership—The reading specialist is a resource for other educators, parents, and the community

Benedictine University

Web Source: http://www.reading.org/General/AboutIRA/PositionStatements/ReadingSpecialistPosition.aspx


Reading specialist2

Reading Specialist

  • Works directly with teachers to an extent, but does not necessarily focus work on this area

  • When working with teachers, may be responding to teachers’ needs and concerns, but also may be directing teachers to meet requirements or implement mandatory programs

Toll, Cathy A. The Literacy Coach’s Survival Guide, (p. 5).

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Literacy Coach


Literacy coach

Literacy Coach

  • Emphasizes support for teachers, although support for others also may take place

  • Provides direct instruction to students primarily when demonstrating for teachers

  • Provides evaluation of students primarily to demonstrate for teachers or to support teachers in their instructional decision making

  • Spends a great amount of time working directly with teachers in individual and small-group meetings

  • Works with teachers mostly in response to teachers’ needs and concerns

Toll, Cathy A. The Literacy Coach’s Survival Guide, (p. 5).

Benedictine University


Literacy coach1

Literacy Coach

What Must Reading Coaches Know and Be Able to Do?

  • Literacy coaches should have successful teaching experiences and/or preparation at their respective levels:

    • Elementary – successful teaching experiences at primary and intermediate levels

    • Middle school - successful teaching experiences at the middle school level

    • High school - successful teaching experiences at the high school level

  • In-depth knowledge of reading processes, acquisition, assessment and instruction

  • Experience working with teachers to improve their practices.

  • Reading coaches must have experience or preparation that enables them to master the complexities of observing and modeling in classrooms and providing feedback to teachers

  • Have experience or preparation enabling them to master the complexities of observing and modeling in classrooms and providing feedback to teachers

  • Be excellent presenters and be familiar with presenting to teacher conferences at the local, state, and even national levels

Benedictine University

Web Source: http://www.reading.org/Libraries/Position_Statements_and_Resolutions/ps1065_reading_coach.sflb.ashx


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Presentation Sign-Up


Presentation sign up

Presentation Sign-up

  • Group “Chapter Presentation” Sign-up:

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Session 1 Assignments


Session 1 assignments due session 2

Session 1 Assignments Due Session 2

  • Read:

    • Toll: Chapters 1 & 2

    • Toll – Page 38

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Session 1 & 2 Objectives


Session 1 objectives1

Session 1 objectives

In Session 1, we have:

  • (Discuss?) the creation and importance of two facilitation tools:

    ‘Group Norms’

    ‘Parking Lot’

  • Examined the definitions of collaboration, collaborative leader, and relationship management

  • Examined the differences between a Reading Specialist and a Literacy Coach

Benedictine University


Session 2 objectives

Session 2 objectives

In Session 2, you will:

  • Review Session 1 Content

  • Examine collaboration in action

  • Evaluate the Life Cycle of a Collaboration

  • Identify the Dimensions of Collaborative Leadership

  • Explain the work of a literacy coach

  • Examine Educational Change

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration

Wrap-Up Activity Example


Pluses and deltas

Pluses and Deltas

  • An extremely powerful, yet often misused, facilitation tool is pluses and deltas

  • The easiest way to conduct pluses and deltas is to simply write “plus” and “delta” while drawing a line down the middle onto flip chart paper

  • The basic idea is after a meeting or training class (especially training classes) each person in the meeting or class will write on post-it notes things they liked about the session (pluses) and things they thought could be improved (deltas)

  • Each person should leave at least one plus and delta before leaving

Benedictine University

Web Source: How Not to Screw up Pluses and Deltas http://lssacademy.com/2007/03/29/how-not-to-screw-up-pluses-and-deltas/


Pluses and deltas1

Pluses and Deltas

  • The biggest mistake people make with pluses and deltas revolves around the proper definition of a delta

  • Firsts: Deltas are NOT complaints/negatives

    • For example, if the room was too hot during the day a complaint would be “the room was too hot”

    • A delta would be “please make the room cooler”…There is a big difference

  • Second: to argue or debate with the class or meeting attendees about deltas

    • If someone wants the room cooler don’t make any wise comments like, “I thought the temperature was fine”

    • As an administrator of the meeting or training class what you think matters little

  • Lastly, when running through the pluses and deltas with the participants (at end of the day or start of the next day) start with the deltas and end with the pluses…It makes things happier

Benedictine University

Web Source: How Not to Screw up Pluses and Deltas http://lssacademy.com/2007/03/29/how-not-to-screw-up-pluses-and-deltas/


Wrap up activity

Wrap-Up Activity

Plus/Delta:

  • What are your Pluses & Deltas?

    • What worked for you + (Plus)

    • What would have been better for you ▲ (Delta)

Benedictine University


Educ 611 literacy coaching and collaboration1

EDUC 611: Literacy Coaching and Collaboration

Session 1


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