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Assessing for learning: A reflexive consideration of the design of innovative approaches to assessing student learning. Phil Clements – ICJS FHSS Learning and Teaching Conference June 2010. Outline. Underpinning Principles Assessing for learning UoP Teachers conceptions of assessment

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Phil Clements – ICJS FHSS Learning and Teaching Conference June 2010

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Phil clements icjs fhss learning and teaching conference june 2010

Assessing for learning: A reflexive consideration of the design of innovative approaches to assessing student learning.

Phil Clements – ICJS

FHSS Learning and Teaching Conference June 2010


Outline

Outline

  • Underpinning Principles

    • Assessing for learning

    • UoP

    • Teachers conceptions of assessment

  • Things to think about

    • Designing out plagiarism

    • Designing in context

    • Design principles

  • Examples

    • ICJS experience


Underpinning principles

Underpinning Principles

“Innovation in assessment is no longer an option in Higher Education” (Taras, 2002:501)

“Making learning happen is not just about causing learning to happen – it’s about making learning being seen to have happened” (Race , 2005:66)

“The spirit and style of student assessment defines the de facto curriculum” (Rowntree 1987:1)

“Assessment includes but also transcends the simple measurement of student achievement” (Light, Cox and Calkins, 2009:201)


Some more principles

Some More Principles

“The overriding consideration is that assessment is meaningful, does not overload staff or students and permits the provision of timely feedback”

UoP Policy on Assessment

Validity

Reliability

Transparency

Authenticity


Teachers conceptions of assessment

Teachers Conceptions of Assessment

Assessment as internal to teaching and focuses on developing deep learning and sophisticated strategies for learning

Awareness of an internal relationship between assessment and teaching but still see assessment as testing acquisition of basic knowledge

Assessment seen as a separate process, external to teaching and learning, conveying to the teacher basic knowledge and skills

Watkins et al (2005) cited in Light, Cox and Calkins (2005: 211)


Assessment as a driver for learning

Assessment as a driver for learning

  • Diversify assessment more

  • Make assessment fit for learning

  • Make assessment a high-learning payoff for students by making the most of feedback

  • Reduce the burden of assessment for learners and for ourselves

  • Assess evidence of what they have learned rather than what we tried to teach

  • Focus learning outcomes on the ‘need to know’ rather than the ‘nice to know’ and don’t measure what it’s ‘nuts to know’

  • Measure ‘know how’ and ‘know why’ more than ‘know what’

  • Involve learners in assessing their own and others work

  • Get the wording right. The student should not have to work out what the assessment means.

(After Race 2005:93-94)


Assessment as a driver for learning1

Assessment as a driver for learning

(After Race 2005:93-94)

Diversify assessment more

Make assessment fit for learning

Make assessment a high-learning payoff for students by making the most of feedback

Reduce the burden of assessment for learners and for ourselves

Assess evidence of what they have learned rather than what we tried to teach

Focus learning outcomes on the ‘need to know’ rather than the ‘nice to know’ and don’t measure what it’s ‘nuts to know’

Measure ‘know how’ and ‘know why’ more than ‘know what’

Involve learners in assessing their own and others work

Get the wording right. The student should not have to work out what the assessment means.


Assessment as a driver for learning2

Assessment as a driver for learning

(After Race 2005:93-94)

Diversify assessment more

Make assessment fit for learning

Make assessment a high-learning payoff for students by making the most of feedback

Reduce the burden of assessment for learners and for ourselves

Assess evidence of what they have learned rather than what we tried to teach

Focus learning outcomes on the ‘need to know’ rather than the ‘nice to know’ and don’t measure what it’s ‘nuts to know’

Measure ‘know how’ and ‘know why’ more than ‘know what’

Involve learners in assessing their own and others work

Get the wording right. The student should not have to work out what the assessment means.


Assessment as a driver for learning3

Assessment as a driver for learning

(After Race 2005:93-94)

Diversify assessment more

Make assessment fit for learning

Make assessment a high-learning payoff for students by making the most of feedback

Reduce the burden of assessment for learners and for ourselves

Assess evidence of what they have learned rather than what we tried to teach

Focus learning outcomes on the ‘need to know’ rather than the ‘nice to know’ and don’t measure what it’s ‘nuts to know’

Measure ‘know how’ and ‘know why’ more than ‘know what’

Involve learners in assessing their own and others work

Get the wording right. The student should not have to work out what the assessment means.


Issues to think about

Issues to think about

  • Opportunity to ‘design-out’ plagiarism

  • Efficiency

  • Consider the context

  • Interesting for the student and the marker?

  • How does it relate to the learning outcomes?

  • Consider peer assessment

  • Employability skills

Could you buy it or find it on the web?

Same as last year?

Make it specific to a context

Offer choice

Is the output worth the inputs?

Is the workload reasonable for learner and marker?

Work related = ideal

What happens in the workplace?

Motivation to learn

Motivation to mark

Centrality of learning outcomes

Innovative assessment may begin with innovative learning outcomes

Level 1 will need formative assessment

Can we use peer assessment better?

Not so much what we are testing but what are we helping them to learn?


Common examples

Examination

Essay

Presentation

Poster

Oral

Reports

Common Examples

Assessments


Specific examples

Specific Examples

ICJS Examples

Criminalistics witness statement

PLC

workbooks

short answer exam

Policing diversity speech PowerPoint

briefings

Law and legal skills plea in mitigation

Workbook

Essay


Phil clements icjs fhss learning and teaching conference june 2010

Creative Thinking

Academic Judgement

Cage?

Framework?

Concern for Learning


References

References

Gipps, C. (1990) Assessment: A Teachers Guide to the Issues. London: Hodder and Stoughton.

Harris, D. & Bell, C. (1990) Evaluating and Assessing for Learning. London: Kogan Page.

Light, G.,Cox, R., & Calkins, S. (2009) Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: The Reflective Professional. London: Sage.

Race, P. (2005) Making learning Happen: A Guide for Post-Compulsory Education. London: Sage.

Rowntree, D. (1987) Assessing Students: How shall we know them?. London: Kogan Page.

Taras, M. (2002). Using assessment for learning and learning from assessment. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 27(6), 501-510.

Yorke, M. (2003). Formative assessment in higher education: Moves towards theory and the enhancement of pedagogic practice. Higher Education, 45(4), 477-501.


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