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Amateur Extra License Class. Chapter 6 Electronic Circuits. Amplifiers. Any circuit that increases the strength of a signal – voltage, current, or power. Input voltages from microvolts to hundreds of volts. Output powers from billionths of a watt to thousands of watts. R. Amplifiers.

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Amateur extra license class

Amateur Extra License Class

Chapter 6

Electronic Circuits


Amplifiers

Amplifiers

  • Any circuit that increases the strength of a signal – voltage, current, or power.

    • Input voltages from microvolts to hundreds of volts.

    • Output powers from billionths of a watt to thousands of watts.

R


Amplifiers1

Amplifiers

  • Definitions.

    • Driver: Circuit that supplies the input signal to the amplifier.

    • Load: Circuit that receives the amplifier’s output signal.

    • Final Amplifier: Last amplifier stage in a transmitter.

R


Amplifiers2

Amplifiers

  • Amplifier Gain.

    • Ratio of output signal to input signal.

      • Voltage gain = VOUT / VIN

      • Current gain = IOUT / IIN

      • Power gain = POUT / PIN

    • Can be expressed as simple ratio.

      • e.g. – Voltage gain = 10

    • Can be expressed in decibels.

      • e.g. – Power gain = 10 dB

R


Amplifiers3

Amplifiers

  • Input and Output Impedances.

    • Input impedance is load seen by driver.

    • Output Impedance is source impedance.

    • Maximum power transfer occurs when source & load impedances are equal.

R


Amplifiers4

Amplifiers

  • Discrete Device Amplifiers

    • Common emitter.

      • Most common amplifier type.

      • Provides both voltage gain and current gain.

      • Input & output voltages 180° out of phase.

      • Fairly high input impedance.

      • Output impedance depends on RL.

R


Amplifiers5

Amplifiers

  • Discrete Device Amplifiers

    • Common emitter.

      • R1 & R2 provide fixed bias.

      • RE provides bias point stability.

        • a.k.a. – Self-bias.

        • Prevents thermal runaway.

      • C2 allows maximum AC signal gain.

        • Emitter bypass.

R


Amplifiers6

Amplifiers

  • Discrete Device Amplifiers

    • Common base.

      • Provides voltage gain.

      • Current gain < 1.

      • Input & output

        voltages in phase.

      • Low input impedance.

      • High output impedance.

R


Amplifiers7

Amplifiers

  • Discrete Device Amplifiers

    • Common collector.

      • a.k.a. - Emitter follower.

      • Provides current gain.

      • Voltage gain < 1.

      • Input & output voltages in phase.

      • Fairly high input impedance.

      • Low output impedance.

      • Linear voltage regulator.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7B10 -- In Figure E7-1, what is the purpose of R1 and R2?

Load resistors

Fixed bias

Self bias

Feedback


Amateur extra license class

E7B11 -- In Figure E7-1, what is the purpose of R3?

Fixed bias

Emitter bypass

Output load resistor

Self bias


Amateur extra license class

E7B12 -- What type of circuit is shown in Figure E7-1?

Switching voltage regulator

Linear voltage regulator

Common emitter amplifier

Emitter follower amplifier


Amateur extra license class

E7B13 -- In Figure E7-2, what is the purpose of R?

Emitter load

Fixed bias

Collector load

Voltage regulation


Amateur extra license class

E7B14 -- In Figure E7-2, what is the purpose of C2?

Output coupling

Emitter bypass

Input coupling

Hum filtering


Amateur extra license class

E7B15 -- What is one way to prevent thermal runaway in a bipolar transistor amplifier?

Neutralization

Select transistors with high beta

Use a resistor in series with the emitter

All of these choices are correct


Amplifiers8

Amplifiers

  • Vacuum Tube Amplifiers

    • Each type of transistor amplifier circuit has a corresponding vacuum tube amplifier circuit.

      • Common-Emitter  Common-Cathode.

      • Common-Base  Grounded-Grid.

      • Common-Collector  Common-Anode.

        • Emitter Follower  Cathode Follower.

R


Amplifiers9

Amplifiers

  • Vacuum Tube Amplifiers.

    • Grounded-Grid Amplifiers.

      • Most common RF power amplifier configuration.

      • Stable.

        • Easier to neutralize.

      • Low input impedance.

        • Little or no input impedance matching required.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7B18 -- Which of the following is a characteristic of a grounded-grid amplifier?

High power gain

High filament voltage

Low input impedance

Low bandwidth


Amplifiers10

Amplifiers

  • Op Amp Amplifiers

    • High-gain, direct-coupled, differential amplifier.

      • Differential input  Input signal is difference between inverting & non-inverting inputs.

      • Direct-coupled  Will amplify DC.

    • Ideal operational amplifier

      • Infinite input impedance.

      • Zero output impedance.

      • Infinite gain.

      • Flat frequency response.

      • Zero offset voltage.

        • 0 VIN 0 VOUT

A


Amplifiers11

Amplifiers

A


Amplifiers12

Amplifiers

A


Amplifiers13

Amplifiers

  • Op Amp Amplifiers

    • Circuit characteristics totally determined by external components.

    • In closed-loop configuration

      • Input voltage = 0.

      • Input current = 0.

A


Amplifiers14

Amplifiers

  • Op Amp Amplifiers

    • Operational amplifier specifications.

      • Open-loop gain.

      • Gain-Bandwidth.

      • Slew rate.

      • Input offset voltage.

        • Input voltage in closed-loop.

      • Input impedance.

      • Output impedance.

A


Amplifiers15

Amplifiers

  • Op Amp Amplifiers

    • Practical operational amplifier.

      • Differential input.

      • Direct-coupled.

      • Very high input impedance.

      • Very low output impedance.

      • Very high voltage gain.

        • Up to 120 dB.

      • Wide bandwidth.

A


Amplifiers16

Amplifiers

LM741

A


Amplifiers17

Amplifiers

  • Op Amp Amplifiers

    • Inverting Amplifier.

Gain = RF / RIN

A


Amplifiers18

Amplifiers

  • Operational Amplifiers (Op-Amps).

    • Non-inverting Amplifier.

  • Gain = (RF + R2) / R2

A


Amplifiers19

Amplifiers

  • Operational Amplifiers (Op-Amps).

    • Differential Amplifier.

  • Gain = (R3 + R1) / R1

  • or

  • Gain = (R4 + R2) / R2

  • where: R1 = R2 and R3 = R4

A


Amplifiers20

Amplifiers

  • Operational Amplifiers (Op-Amps).

    • Summing Amplifier.

      • Vout = - ((V1 x RF /Rin) + (V2 x RF /Rin) + (V3 x RF /Rin))

      • Vout = - (V1 + V2 + V3) x RF /Rin

A


Amateur extra license class

E7G07 -- What magnitude of voltage gain can be expected from the circuit in Figure E7-4 when R1 is 10 ohms and RF is 470 ohms?

0.21

94

47

24


Amateur extra license class

E7G08 -- How does the gain of an ideal operational amplifier vary with frequency?

It increases linearly with increasing frequency

It decreases linearly with increasing frequency

It decreases logarithmically with increasing frequency

It does not vary with frequency


Amateur extra license class

E7G09 -- What will be the output voltage of the circuit shown in Figure E7-4 if R1 is 1000 ohms, RF is 10,000 ohms, and 0.23 volts dc is applied to the input?

0.23 volts

2.3 volts

-0.23 volts

-2.3 volts


Amateur extra license class

E7G10 -- What absolute voltage gain can be expected from the circuit in Figure E7-4 when R1 is 1800 ohms and RF is 68 kilohms?

1

0.03

38

76


Amateur extra license class

E7G11 -- What absolute voltage gain can be expected from the circuit in Figure E7-4 when R1 is 3300 ohms and RF is 47 kilohms?

28

14

7

0.07


Amateur extra license class

E7G12 -- What is an integrated circuit operational amplifier?

A high-gain, direct-coupled differential amplifier with very high input and very low output impedance

A digital audio amplifier whose characteristics are determined by components external to the amplifier

An amplifier used to increase the average output of frequency modulated amateur signals to the legal limit

An RF amplifier used in the UHF and microwave regions


Amateur extra license class

E7G13 -- What is meant by the term op-amp input-offset voltage?

The output voltage of the op-amp minus its input voltage

The difference between the output voltage of the op-amp and the input voltage required in the immediately following stage

The differential input voltage needed to bring the open-loop output voltage to zero

The potential between the amplifier input terminals of the op-amp in an open-loop condition


Amateur extra license class

E7G14 -- What is the typical input impedance of an integrated circuit op-amp?

100 ohms

1000 ohms

Very low

Very high


Amateur extra license class

E7G15 -- What is the typical output impedance of an integrated circuit op-amp?

Very low

Very high

100 ohms

1000 ohms


Amplifiers21

Amplifiers

  • Amplifier Classes.

    • Class A

      • On for 360°

      • Best linearity.

      • Least efficient.

    • Class B

      • On for 180°

      • Non-linear.

        • 2 devices in push-pull configuration is linear.

      • More efficient.

A


Amplifiers22

Amplifiers

  • Amplifier Classes.

    • Class AB

      • On for >180° but < 360°

      • Non-linear.

        • 2 devices in push-pull configuration is linear.

      • Compromise between classes A & B

    • Class C

      • On for <180°

      • Highly non-linear.

      • Most efficient.

A


Amplifiers23

Amplifiers

  • Amplifier Classes.

    • Class D

      • Used for audio amplifiers.

      • Uses switching techniques to achieve high efficiency.

        • Switching speed well above highest frequency to be amplified.

        • Efficiency >90%.

A


Amateur extra license class

E7B01 -- For what portion of a signal cycle does a Class AB amplifier operate?

More than 180 degrees but less than 360 degrees

Exactly 180 degrees

The entire cycle

Less than 180 degrees


Amateur extra license class

E7B02 -- What is a Class D amplifier?

A type of amplifier that uses switching technology to achieve high efficiency

A low power amplifier using a differential amplifier for improved linearity

An amplifier using drift-mode FETs for high efficiency

A frequency doubling amplifier


Amateur extra license class

E7B03 -- Which of the following forms the output of a class D amplifier circuit?

A low-pass filter to remove switching signal components

A high-pass filter to compensate for low gain at low frequencies

A matched load resistor to prevent damage by switching transients

A temperature-compensated load resistor to improve linearity


Amateur extra license class

E7B04 -- Where on the load line of a Class A common emitter amplifier would bias normally be set?

Approximately half-way between saturation and cutoff

Where the load line intersects the voltage axis

At a point where the bias resistor equals the load resistor

At a point where the load line intersects the zero bias current curve


Amplifiers24

Amplifiers

  • Distortion and Intermodulation.

    • Distortion

      • Non-linearity results in distortion.

      • ALL physical components have some non-linearity.

      • Distortion results in harmonics.

      • Can have low distortion or high efficiency, but not both.

A


Amplifiers25

Amplifiers

  • Distortion and Intermodulation.

    • Intermodulation.

      • 2 or more signals mixing together to produce other frequencies.

        • FIMD = (A x F1) – (B x F2).

        • If A+B is odd, then odd-order intermodulation product.

          • Fimd is near fundamental or odd harmonics of F1 & F2.

        • If A+B is even then even-order intermodulation product.

          • Fimd is near even harmonics of F1 & F2.

      • Since odd-order IMD products are close to desired frequency, spurious signals can be transmitted.

A


Amplifiers26

Amplifiers

  • Distortion and Intermodulation.

    • Tuned amplifiers.

      • Power amplifiers are a compromise between linearity & efficiency.

      • Tuned output circuit acts like a “flywheel”, minimizing effects of distortion.

A


Amplifiers27

Amplifiers

  • Distortion and Intermodulation.

    • Selecting amplifier class.

      • For audio, AM or SSB, a linear amplifier is required.

      • For CW or FM, a non-linear amplifier may be used.

A


Amplifiers28

Amplifiers

  • Distortion and Intermodulation.

    • Selecting amplifier class.

      • For best linearity & lowest efficiency, use Class A.

        • Low-level stages.

        • Audio power amplifiers.

      • For a good compromise between linearity & efficiency, use Class AB.

        • RF Power amplifiers.

A


Amplifiers29

Amplifiers

  • Distortion and Intermodulation.

    • Selecting amplifier class.

      • For highest efficiency or intentional harmonics, use Class C.

        • Frequency multiplier stages.

        • CW transmitters.

        • FM transmitters & receivers.

A


Amplifiers30

Amplifiers

  • Distortion and Intermodulation.

    • Selecting amplifier class.

      • Class B push-pull circuits.

        • Audio power amplifiers.

        • Even harmonics are reduced.

A


Amateur extra license class

E7B06 -- Which of the following amplifier types reduces or eliminates even-order harmonics?

Push-push

Push-pull

Class C

Class AB


Amateur extra license class

E7B07 -- Which of the following is a likely result when a Class C amplifier is used to amplify a single-sideband phone signal?

Reduced intermodulation products

Increased overall intelligibility

Signal inversion

Signal distortion and excessive bandwidth


Amateur extra license class

E7B16 -- What is the effect of intermodulation products in a linear power amplifier?

Transmission of spurious signals

Creation of parasitic oscillations

Low efficiency

All of these choices are correct


Amateur extra license class

E7B17 -- Why are third-order intermodulation distortion products of particular concern in linear power amplifiers?

Because they are relatively close in frequency to the desired signal

Because they are relatively far in frequency from the desired signal

Because they invert the sidebands causing distortion

Because they maintain the sidebands, thus causing multiple duplicate signals


Amplifiers31

Amplifiers

  • Instability and Parasitic Oscillation.

    • Amplifier stability.

      • Excessive gain or undesired positive feedback can cause an amplifier to oscillate.

      • Can occur in any amplifier stage, not just power amplifiers.

      • Can result in:

        • Increased noise figure in receiver.

        • Spurious radiations.

        • Excessive heating.

R


Amplifiers32

Amplifiers

  • Instability and Parasitic Oscillation.

    • Neutralization.

      • Inter-electrode capacitances in amplifying device and/or stray capacitances in associated circuitry can cause an amplifier to oscillate at the frequency of operation.

      • Oscillation can be prevented by “neutralizing the amplifier.

        • Feed small amount of signal back to input out-of-phase.

R


Amplifiers33

Amplifiers

  • Instability and Parasitic Oscillation.

    • Neutralization.

R


Amplifiers34

Amplifiers

  • Instability and Parasitic Oscillation.

    • Parasitic oscillation.

      • Not related to operating frequency.

      • Caused by resonances in surrounding circuitry.

      • Typically at VHF or UHF frequencies.

      • Parasitic oscillations in HF vacuum tube amplifiers are eliminated by adding parasitic suppressors to the plate or grid leads.

        • Coil in parallel with resistor.

R


Amplifiers35

Amplifiers

  • Instability and Parasitic Oscillation.

    • Parasitic suppressor.

R


Amplifiers36

Amplifiers

  • Instability and Parasitic Oscillation.

    • Parasitic suppressor.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7B05 -- What can be done to prevent unwanted oscillations in an RF power amplifier?

Tune the stage for maximum SWR

Tune both the input and output for maximum power

Install parasitic suppressors and/or neutralize the stage

Use a phase inverter in the output filter


Amateur extra license class

E7B08 -- How can an RF power amplifier be neutralized?

By increasing the driving power

By reducing the driving power

By feeding a 180-degree out-of-phase portion of the output back to the input

By feeding an in-phase component of the output back to the input


Amplifiers37

Amplifiers

  • VHF, UHF, and Microwave Amplifiers.

    • At VHF & higher frequencies, special techniques & devices are required to design & construct amplifiers.

      • Short wavelengths mean component leads can have significant inductance.

      • Due to internal capacitances, ordinary tubes & transistors lose ability to amplify.

    • The following slides describe only some of the devices & techniques used.

R


Amplifiers38

Amplifiers

  • VHF, UHF, and Microwave Amplifiers.

    • Klystrons.

      • Velocity modulation.

R


Amplifiers39

Amplifiers

  • VHF, UHF, and Microwave Amplifiers.

    • Parametric amplifiers.

      • Invented by amateur radio operators.

      • Uses variable reactance (varactor diode) to “pump” input signal.

      • Used for very low noise receive pre-amplifiers at microwave frequencies & above.

R


Amplifiers40

Amplifiers

  • VHF, UHF, and Microwave Amplifiers.

    • Parametric amplifiers.

R


Amplifiers41

Amplifiers

  • VHF, UHF, and Microwave Amplifiers.

    • Microwave semiconductor amplifiers.

      • Geometry of junction transistors limits upper frequency limit to a few GHz.

      • Gallium-Arsenide FET’s can operate up to 20-30 GHz.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7B19 -- What is a klystron?

A high speed multivibrator

An electron-coupled oscillator utilizing a pentode vacuum tube

An oscillator utilizing ceramic elements to achieve stability

A VHF, UHF, or microwave vacuum tube that uses velocity modulation


Amateur extra license class

E7B20 -- What is a parametric amplifier?

A type of bipolar operational amplifier with excellent linearity derived from use of very high voltage on the collector

A low-noise VHF or UHF amplifier relying on varying reactance for amplification

A high power amplifier for HF application utilizing the Miller effect to increase gain

An audio push-pull amplifier using silicon carbide transistors for extremely low noise


Amateur extra license class

E7B21 -- Which of the following devices is generally best suited for UHF or microwave power amplifier applications?

Field effect transistor

Nuvistor

Silicon controlled rectifier

Triac


Break

Break


Signal processing

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Generates sine wave.

    • Amplifier with positive feedback.

      • AV = Amplifier gain.

      • β = Feedback ratio.

      • Loop Gain = AV x β

      • If loop gain > 1 and in phase, circuit will oscillate.

A


Signal processing1

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Colpitts oscillator.

      • Tapped capacitance.

    • Hartley oscillator.

      • Tapped inductance.

A


Signal processing2

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Pierce oscillator.

      • Tuned circuit replaced

        with a crystal.

A


Signal processing3

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Crystals.

      • Usually small wafer of quartz with precise dimensions.

      • Piezoelectric effect.

        • Crystal deforms mechanically when voltage applied.

        • Voltage generated when crystal deformed.

A


Signal processing4

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Crystals.

      • Equivalent circuit.

        • C1 = Motional capacitance

        • L1 = Motional inductance

        • R1 = Loss resistance

        • C0 = Electrode & stray capacitance

A


Signal processing5

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Crystals.

      • Frequency is accurate when connected to a specified parallel capacitance.

A


Signal processing6

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Variable-frequency oscillator.

      • Make either L or C adjustable.

      • Not as stable.

A


Signal processing7

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Microwave oscillators.

      • Magnetron.

        • Diode tube with a resonant cavity surrounded by external magnet.

        • Magnetic field causes electrons to spiral, generating RF energy at a frequency determined by the dimensions of the cavity.

A


Signal processing8

Signal Processing

  • Oscillator Circuits & Characteristics.

    • Microwave oscillators.

      • Gunn diode oscillators.

        • Diode.

          • Similar to tunnel diode.

          • Negative resistance.

        • Resonant cavity

A


Amateur extra license class

E6E03 -- What is one aspect of the piezoelectric effect?

Physical deformation of a crystal by the application of a voltage

Mechanical deformation of a crystal by the application of a magnetic field

The generation of electrical energy by the application of light

Reversed conduction states when a P-N junction is exposed to light


Amateur extra license class

E6E09 -- Which of the following must be done to insure that a crystal oscillator provides the frequency specified by the crystal manufacturer?

Provide the crystal with a specified parallel inductance

Provide the crystal with a specified parallel capacitance

Bias the crystal at a specified voltage

Bias the crystal at a specified current


Amateur extra license class

E7H01 -- What are three oscillator circuits used in Amateur Radio equipment?

Taft, Pierce and negative feedback

Pierce, Fenner and Beane

Taft, Hartley and Pierce

Colpitts, Hartley and Pierce


Amateur extra license class

E7H02 -- What condition must exist for a circuit to oscillate?

It must have at least two stages

It must be neutralized

It must have positive feedback with a gain greater than 1

It must have negative feedback sufficient to cancel the input signal


Amateur extra license class

E7H03 -- How is positive feedback supplied in a Hartley oscillator?

Through a tapped coil

Through a capacitive divider

Through link coupling

Through a neutralizing capacitor


Amateur extra license class

E7H04 -- How is positive feedback supplied in a Colpitts oscillator?

Through a tapped coil

Through link coupling

Through a capacitive divider

Through a neutralizing capacitor


Amateur extra license class

E7H05 -- How is positive feedback supplied in a Pierce oscillator?

Through a tapped coil

Through link coupling

Through a neutralizing capacitor

Through a quartz crystal


Amateur extra license class

E7H06 -- Which of the following oscillator circuits are commonly used in VFOs?

Pierce and Zener

Colpitts and Hartley

Armstrong and deForest

Negative feedback and balanced feedback


Amateur extra license class

E7H07 -- What is a magnetron oscillator?

An oscillator in which the output is fed back to the input by the magnetic field of a transformer

A crystal oscillator in which variable frequency is obtained by placing the crystal in a strong magnetic field

A UHF or microwave oscillator consisting of a diode vacuum tube with a specially shaped anode, surrounded by an external magnet

A reference standard oscillator in which the oscillations are synchronized by magnetic coupling to a rubidium gas tube


Amateur extra license class

E7H08 -- What is a Gunn diode oscillator?

An oscillator based on the negative resistance properties of properly-doped semiconductors

An oscillator based on the argon gas diode

A highly stable reference oscillator based on the tee-notch principle

A highly stable reference oscillator based on the hot-carrier effect


Signal processing9

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Part of practically all modern transceivers.

    • Allows signal processing difficult to obtain by analog methods.

    • Procedure:

      • Convert analog signal to series of numbers.

      • Process series of numbers mathematically.

      • Convert resulting series of numbers back to analog signal.

R


Signal processing10

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Analog-to-digital conversion.

      • Sequential sampling.

        • Sample signal at regular intervals (sequential sampling).

        • Convert signal value to a number.

        • Higher sampling rates yields higher accuracy.

        • More “bits” in the number yields higher accuracy

R


Signal processing11

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Sine wave, alias sine wave, harmonic sampling.

      • If sample rate is less than frequency of signal being sampled, result does not match input signal.

        • Retains general shape of sine wave but at lower frequency.

        • Downward frequency translation can be useful.

        • Longer time between samples provides more processing time.

R


Signal processing12

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Sine wave, alias sine wave, harmonic sampling.

      • Harmonic sampling.

        • If frequency of signal being sampled is about twice the sampling rate, result is exactly same as if frequency is equal to sampling rate.

          • Must limit bandwidth of signal being sampled.

R


Signal processing13

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Sine wave, alias sine wave, harmonic sampling.

      • Aliasing.

        • Nyquist sampling theorem.

          • To avoid aliasing, sampling rate must be ≥ 2x highest frequency being sampled.

R


Signal processing14

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Data converters.

      • Analog-to-digital converter (ADC).

        • Device that performs analog-to-digital conversion.

        • Produces a binary number that is directly proportional to value of the input voltage.

        • More bits in binary number  higher resolution.

          • 8 bits  256 steps.

          • 16 bits  65,536 steps.

          • 24 bits  16,777,216 steps.

R


Signal processing15

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Data converters.

      • Digital-to-analog converter (DAC).

        • Device that performs digital-to-analog conversion.

        • Produces an output voltage that is directly proportional to value of a binary number.

        • More bits in binary number  higher resolution.

          • 8 bits  256 steps.

          • 16 bits  65,536 steps.

          • 24 bits  16,777,216 steps.

R


Signal processing16

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Representation of Numbers.

      • Floating Point

        • Similar to scientific notation.

        • Greater range of numbers can be handled.

          • Not necessary for DSP since range of numbers limited by precision of ADC.

        • Used in PC’s.

      • Fixed Point

        • Fraction <1.

        • Used for most DSP in amateur equipment.

R


Signal processing17

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Software-Defined Radio (SDR).

      • A software-defined radio (SDR) system is a radio communication system where components that have been typically implemented in hardware (e.g. mixers, filters, modulators/demodulators, detectors, etc.) are instead implemented by means of software on a computer or embedded computing devices.

R


Signal processing18

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Software-Defined Radio (SDR).

      • The ideal SDR receiver would be to attach an antenna to an analog-to-digital converter (ADC).

      • Similarly, the ideal SDR transmitter would be to attach a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) to an antenna.

      • Not feasible with current technology, so some compromise is necessary.

R


Signal processing19

Signal Processing

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP)

    • Software-Defined Radio (SDR).

      • Some analog processing still required.

      • Future is an all-digital radio.

      • Commercial SDR’s now available for amateur use.

R


Amateur extra license class

E8A14 -- Which of these methods is commonly used to convert analog signals to digital signals?

Sequential sampling

Harmonic regeneration

Level shifting

Phase reversal


Signal processing20

Signal Processing

  • Mixers

    • Used to change the frequency of a signal.

    • Mathematically multiplies 2 frequencies together, generating 4 output frequencies.

      • f1 x f2 f1, f2, f1+f2, f1–f2

    • Superheterodyne receiver.

      • fRF x fLO fLO–fRF

R


Signal processing21

Signal Processing

  • Mixers

    • Only enough pre-amp gain should be used to overcome mixer losses.

    • Excessive input signal can:

      • Overload mixer circuit.

      • Distort signal.

      • Generate spurious mixer products.

    • Operation of a mixer is similar to operation of product detectors & modulators.

R


Signal processing22

Signal Processing

  • Mixers

R


Signal processing23

Signal Processing

  • Mixers

    • Passive mixers.

      • Uses passive components such as diodes.

      • No amplification.

      • Some conversion loss.

      • Require strong LO signal.

      • Generate noise.

R


Signal processing24

Signal Processing

  • Mixers

    • Single-balanced mixer.

R


Signal processing25

Signal Processing

  • Mixers

    • Double-balanced mixer.

      • fRF & fLO are suppressed leaving only sum & difference frequencies.

R


Signal processing26

Signal Processing

  • Mixers

    • Active mixers.

      • Uses active components such as transistors or FET’s.

      • Amplification possible.

      • No conversion loss.

      • Less LO signal needed.

      • Generate less noise.

      • Strong signal handling capability not as good as passive mixers.

R


Signal processing27

Signal Processing

  • Mixers

    • Dual-gate MOSFET mixer.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7E08 -- What are the principal frequencies that appear at the output of a mixer circuit?

Two and four times the original frequency

The sum, difference and square root of the input frequencies

The two input frequencies along with their sum and difference frequencies

1.414 and 0.707 times the input frequency


Amateur extra license class

E7E09 -- What occurs when an excessive amount of signal energy reaches a mixer circuit?

Spurious mixer products are generated

Mixer blanking occurs

Automatic limiting occurs

A beat frequency is generated


Signal processing28

Signal Processing

  • Modulation

    • Combining a modulating signal with an RF signal resulting in a signal that can be transmitted.

      • Modulating signal also known as the “baseband” signal.

R


Signal processing29

Signal Processing

  • Modulators

    • Amplitude modulation.

      • Multiplying (mixing) AF signal & carrier produces amplitude modulated signal.

R


Signal processing30

Signal Processing

  • Modulators

    • Single-sideband modulation.

      • Filter method.

        • Start with AM double-sideband signal & use filters to remove one sideband & the carrier.

        • Better idea – use a balanced modulator (mixer) to generate a double-sideband suppressed carrier signal. Then all you have to filter out is the unwanted sideband.

R


Signal processing31

Signal Processing

  • Modulators

    • Single-sideband modulation.

      • Phasing (quadrature) method.

        • Generate 2 identical carrier signals, 90° out of phase.

        • Generate 2 identical audio signals, 90° out of phase.

        • Mix these together in a pair of balanced modulators & result is that the carrier & one sideband are canceled out leaving only one sideband.

        • 90° phase shift of band of audio frequencies difficult to accomplish in hardware, but easy in software.

          • Hilbert-transform filters.

        • Most SDR transmitters use the phasing or quadrature method to generate SSB mathematically.

R


Signal processing32

Signal Processing

  • Modulators

    • Single-sideband modulation.

      • Phasing (quadrature) method.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7C09 -- What type of digital signal processing filter might be used to generate an SSB signal?

An adaptive filter

A notch filter

A Hilbert-transform filter

An elliptical filter


Amateur extra license class

E7E04 -- What is one way a single-sideband phone signal can be generated?

By using a balanced modulator followed by a filter

By using a reactance modulator followed by a mixer

By using a loop modulator followed by a mixer

By driving a product detector with a DSB signal


Amateur extra license class

E7E07 -- What is meant by the term baseband in radio communications?

The lowest frequency band that the transmitter or receiver covers

The frequency components present in the modulating signal

The unmodulated bandwidth of the transmitted signal

The basic oscillator frequency in an FM transmitter that is multiplied to increase the deviation and carrier frequency


Amateur extra license class

E7E13 -- Which of the following describes a common means of generating an SSB signal when using digital signal processing?

Mixing products are converted to voltages and subtracted by adder circuits

A frequency synthesizer removes the unwanted sidebands

Emulation of quartz crystal filter characteristics

The quadrature method


Signal processing33

Signal Processing

  • Modulators

    • Frequency and phase modulation.

      • Direct FM

        • Frequency deviation constant with

          modulating frequency.

        • Generated by adding reactance

          modulator to oscillator circuit.

A


Signal processing34

Signal Processing

  • Modulators

    • Frequency and phase modulation.

      • Indirect FM (phase modulation).

        • Frequency deviation increases with increasing modulating frequency.

        • Generated by adding reactance modulator to any stage other than the oscillator.

A


Signal processing35

Signal Processing

  • Modulators

    • Frequency and phase modulation.

      • Pre-emphasis is amplifying the higher modulating frequencies more than the lower frequencies.

        • Adding pre-emphasis to the modulating signal of an FM transmitter yields a PM signal.

        • Pre-emphasis yields a better signal-to-noise ratio.

        • Corresponding de-emphasis is added to the receiver.

A


Amateur extra license class

E7E01 -- Which of the following can be used to generate FM phone emissions?

A balanced modulator on the audio amplifier

A reactance modulator on the oscillator

A reactance modulator on the final amplifier

A balanced modulator on the oscillator


Amateur extra license class

E7E02 -- What is the function of a reactance modulator?

To produce PM signals by using an electrically variable resistance

To produce AM signals by using an electrically variable inductance or capacitance

To produce AM signals by using an electrically variable resistance

To produce PM signals by using an electrically variable inductance or capacitance


Amateur extra license class

E7E03 -- How does an analog phase modulator function?

By varying the tuning of a microphone preamplifier to produce PM signals

By varying the tuning of an amplifier tank circuit to produce AM signals

By varying the tuning of an amplifier tank circuit to produce PM signals

By varying the tuning of a microphone preamplifier to produce AM signals


Amateur extra license class

E7E05 -- What circuit is added to an FM transmitter to boost the higher audio frequencies?

A de-emphasis network

A heterodyne suppressor

An audio prescaler

A pre-emphasis network


Amateur extra license class

E7E06 -- Why is de-emphasis commonly used in FM communications receivers?

For compatibility with transmitters using phase modulation

To reduce impulse noise reception

For higher efficiency

To remove third-order distortion products


Signal processing36

Signal Processing

  • Detectors and Demodulators

    • Detectors.

      • Simplest detector is the diode detector.

        • a.k.a. – Envelope detector.

R


Signal processing37

Signal Processing

  • Detectors and Demodulators

    • Product Detectors.

      • Multiplies signal with a local oscillator to retrieve the modulating signal.

        • fRF x fLO fRF–fLO fAF

R


Signal processing38

Signal Processing

  • Detectors and Demodulators

    • Product Detectors.

      • For AM, local oscillator frequency & phase must precisely match AM signal carrier.

      • For SSB, local oscillator frequency must match carrier frequency of suppressed carrier.

      • For CW, local oscillator frequency is offset from signal frequency to produce a sidetone.

R


Signal processing39

Signal Processing

  • Detectors and Demodulators

    • Direct Conversion.

      • Local oscillator is at the frequency of the received signal.

      • Requires very stable local oscillator.

      • Software-defined radios (SDR) typically uses a modified direct-conversion technique.

        • Signal is converted to a baseband AF signal for A-to-D conversion & processing.

R


Signal processing40

Signal Processing

  • Detectors and Demodulators

    • Detecting FM signals.

      • Frequency discriminator.

        • a.k.a. – Foster-Seeley Detector.

R


Signal processing41

Signal Processing

  • Detectors and Demodulators

    • Detecting FM signals.

      • Ratio detector.

R


Signal processing42

Signal Processing

  • Detectors and Demodulators

    • Detecting FM signals.

      • Slope detector.

        • Use AM receiver’s selectivity curve to detect FM.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7E10 -- How does a diode detector function?

By rectification and filtering of RF signals

By breakdown of the Zener voltage

By mixing signals with noise in the transition region of the diode

By sensing the change of reactance in the diode with respect to frequency


Amateur extra license class

E7E11 -- Which of the following types of detector is well suited for demodulating SSB signals?

Discriminator

Phase detector

Product detector

Phase comparator


Amateur extra license class

E7E12 -- What is a frequency discriminator stage in a FM receiver?

An FM generator circuit

A circuit for filtering two closely adjacent signals

An automatic band-switching circuit

A circuit for detecting FM signals


Amateur extra license class

E7E14 -- What is meant by direct conversion when referring to a software defined receiver?

Software is converted from source code to object code during operation of the receiver

Incoming RF is converted to the IF frequency by rectification to generate the control voltage for a voltage controlled oscillator

Incoming RF is mixed to “baseband” for analog-to-digital conversion and subsequent processing

Software is generated in machine language, avoiding the need for compilers


Signal processing43

Signal Processing

  • Frequency Synthesis

    • Phase-Locked Loop (PLL).

A


Signal processing44

Signal Processing

  • Frequency Synthesis

    • Phase-Locked Loop (PLL).

      • Servo loop

        • Error-detecting circuit with negative feedback.

      • Allows VFO to have stability of crystal oscillator.

      • Can do FM modulation & demodulation.

      • Capture range – Range of frequencies over which PLL can achieve lock.

      • Spectral impurities are mainly broadband phase noise.

      • PLL has been replaced in modern designs by direct digital synthesis.

A


Signal processing45

Signal Processing

  • Frequency Synthesis

    • Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS).

      • Generates sine wave by looking up values in a table.

      • Changing phase increment changes frequency.

      • Increase tuning range by adding PLL.

      • No phase noise, but spurs at discrete frequencies.

A


Amateur extra license class

E7H09 -- What type of frequency synthesizer circuit uses a phase accumulator, lookup table, digital to analog converter and a low-pass anti-alias filter?

A direct digital synthesizer

A hybrid synthesizer

A phase locked loop synthesizer

A diode-switching matrix synthesizer


Amateur extra license class

E7H10 -- What information is contained in the lookup table of a direct digital frequency synthesizer?

The phase relationship between a reference oscillator and the output waveform

The amplitude values that represent a sine-wave output

The phase relationship between a voltage-controlled oscillator and the output waveform

The synthesizer frequency limits and frequency values stored in the radio memories


Amateur extra license class

E7H11 -- What are the major spectral impurity components of direct digital synthesizers?

Broadband noise

Digital conversion noise

Spurious signals at discrete frequencies

Nyquist limit noise


Amateur extra license class

E7H12 -- Which of the following is a principal component of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS)?

Phase splitter

Hex inverter

Chroma demodulator

Phase accumulator


Amateur extra license class

E7H13 -- What is the capture range of a phase-locked loop circuit?

The frequency range over which the circuit can lock

The voltage range over which the circuit can lock

The input impedance range over which the circuit can lock

The range of time it takes the circuit to lock


Amateur extra license class

E7H14 -- What is a phase-locked loop circuit?

An electronic servo loop consisting of a ratio detector, reactance modulator, and voltage-controlled oscillator

An electronic circuit also known as a monostablemultivibrator

An electronic servo loop consisting of a phase detector, a low-pass filter, a voltage-controlled oscillator, and a stable reference oscillator

An electronic circuit consisting of a precision push-pull amplifier with a differential input


Amateur extra license class

E7H15 -- Which of these functions can be performed by a phase-locked loop?

Wide-band AF and RF power amplification

Comparison of two digital input signals, digital pulse counter

Photovoltaic conversion, optical coupling

Frequency synthesis, FM demodulation


Amateur extra license class

E7H16 -- Why is the short-term stability of the reference oscillator important in the design of a phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer?

Any amplitude variations in the reference oscillator signal will prevent the loop from locking to the desired signal

Any phase variations in the reference oscillator signal will produce phase noise in the synthesizer output

Any phase variations in the reference oscillator signal will produce harmonic distortion in the modulating signal

Any amplitude variations in the reference oscillator signal will prevent the loop from changing frequency


Amateur extra license class

E7H17 -- Why is a phase-locked loop often used as part of a variable frequency synthesizer for receivers and transmitters?

It generates FM sidebands

It eliminates the need for a voltage controlled oscillator

It makes it possible for a VFO to have the same degree of frequency stability as a crystal oscillator

It can be used to generate or demodulate SSB signals by quadrature phase synchronization


Amateur extra license class

E7H18 -- What are the major spectral impurity components of phase-locked loop synthesizers?

Phase noise

Digital conversion noise

Spurious signals at discrete frequencies

Nyquist limit noise


Break1

Break


Filters and impedance matching

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Families and Response Types

    • Filters are circuits designed to pass certain frequencies and reject others.

      • R-C circuits.

      • R-L circuits.

      • R-L-C circuits.

    • A resonant circuit is a simple filter.

      • Filters normally pass a wider range of frequencies than a simple resonant circuit.

R


Filters and impedance matching1

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Families and Response Types

    • Passive filters.

      • Constructed using only passive components.

        • Capacitors.

        • Inductors.

        • Resistors.

      • Other types.

        • Crystal.

        • Mechanical.

        • Cavity.

      • Always have insertion loss.

R


Filters and impedance matching2

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Families and Response Types

    • Active filters.

      • Include an amplifying device.

        • No insertion loss.

        • Can have gain.

      • Some types of filters can ONLY be built using active components.

R


Filters and impedance matching3

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Classification

    • Low-pass filter.

      • Passes all frequencies below the cut-off frequency.

      • Attenuates all frequencies above the cut-off frequency.

      • Cut-off frequency is the frequency where the response falls to 3 dB below the maximum level.

R


Filters and impedance matching4

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Classification

    • High-pass filter.

      • Attenuates all frequencies below the cut-off frequency.

      • Passes all frequencies above the cut-off frequency.

      • Cut-off frequency is the frequency where the response rises to 3 dB below the maximum level.

R


Filters and impedance matching5

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Classification

    • Band-pass filter.

      • 2 cut-off frequencies.

        • Cut-off frequencies are frequencies where response is 3dB below maximum.

      • Passes all frequencies between the cut-off frequencies.

      • Attenuates all frequencies outside of the cut-off frequencies.

R


Filters and impedance matching6

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Classification

    • Band-reject filter.

      • If the passband is narrow, it is called a notch filter.

      • 2 cut-off frequencies.

      • Attenuates all frequencies between the cut-off frequencies.

      • Passes all frequencies

        outside of the cut-off

        frequencies.

R


Filters and impedance matching7

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Design

    • Definitions.

      • Response curve.

        • Output signal level vs. frequency.

        • Cut-off frequency = -3 dB point.

        • Cut-off transition.

          • Steepness of curve in transistion region.

          • Steep transition curve  sharp filter.

        • Ripple.

          • Variations of response curve in passband or outside of passband.

R


Filters and impedance matching8

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Design

    • Definitions.

      • Phase response.

        • Shift of signal phase vs. frequency.

        • Higher attenuation  more phase shift.

        • Linear phase shift means phase shift is smooth with no ripple as frequency changes.

        • Non-linear phase response can distort digital signals.

      • Ringing.

        • Oscillations continue after signal is removed.

R


Filters and impedance matching9

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Design

    • Butterworth

      • Minimum ripple in both pass band & stop band.

      • Cutoff transition smooth but not steep.

      • Smoothly varying phase response.

R


Filters and impedance matching10

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Design

    • Chebyshev

      • Ripple in pass band.

      • Sharper cutoff transition.

      • Significant phase shift in pass band.

R


Filters and impedance matching11

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Design

    • Elliptical

      • Ripple in both pass band & stop band.

      • Sharpest cutoff transition.

      • Notches are positioned at specific frequencies in stopband to make transition as sharp as possible.

R


Filters and impedance matching12

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Design

    • Shape factor.

      • Measurement of “sharpness” of filter.

      • Ratio of -60dB bandwidth to -6dB bandwidth.

        • SF = BW60dB / BW6dB

      • The closer the ratio is to 1.0, the sharper the filter.

        • An ideal filter would have a shape factor of 1.0.

R


Filters and impedance matching13

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Design

    • Shape factor.

Filter Characteristics

6dB Bandwidth 487 Hz,

60dB Bandwidth 660 Hz

Shape Factor ~1.36

R


Filters and impedance matching14

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Filter Design

    • Shape factor.

Filter Characteristics

6dB Bandwidth 2587 Hz,

60dB Bandwidth 2756 Hz

Shape Factor ~1.06

R


Filters and impedance matching15

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Cavity Filters

    • Cavity filters use the resonant properties of a conductive tube or box to act as a filter.

    • Cavity filters have an extremely narrow bandwidth (extremely high Q) and very low loss.

    • Cavity filters are often used in repeater duplexers.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7C05 -- Which filter type is described as having ripple in the passband and a sharp cutoff?

A Butterworth filter

An active LC filter

A passive op-amp filter

A Chebyshev filter


Amateur extra license class

E7C06 -- What are the distinguishing features of an elliptical filter?

Gradual passband rolloff with minimal stop band ripple

Extremely flat response over its pass band with gradually rounded stop band corners

Extremely sharp cutoff with one or more notches in the stop band

Gradual passband rolloff with extreme stop band ripple


Amateur extra license class

E7C07 -- What kind of filter would you use to attenuate an interfering carrier signal while receiving an SSB transmission?

A band-pass filter

A notch filter

A Pi-network filter

An all-pass filter


Amateur extra license class

E7C10 -- Which of the following filters would be the best choice for use in a 2 meter repeater duplexer?

A crystal filter

A cavity filter

A DSP filter

An L-C filter


Amateur extra license class

E7C14 -- Which of these modes is most affected by non-linear phase response in a receiver IF filter?

Meteor Scatter

Single-Sideband voice

Digital

Video


Amateur extra license class

E7G02 -- What is the effect of ringing in a filter?

An echo caused by a long time delay

A reduction in high frequency response

Partial cancellation of the signal over a range of frequencies

Undesired oscillations added to the desired signal


Filters and impedance matching16

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Crystal filters.

    • IF stages of a receiver require very narrow bandwidth (high Q) filters with sharp transitions to filter out adjacent signals.

      • Cannot be achieved with L-C filters.

    • SSB transmitters require very narrow bandwidth (high Q) filters with sharp transitions to filter out unwanted sideband.

      • Cannot be achieved with L-C filters.

R


Filters and impedance matching17

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Crystal filters.

    • Lattice filter.

      • Typically used in SSB transmitters to remove unwanted sideband.

R


Filters and impedance matching18

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Crystal filters.

    • Ladder filter.

      • Bandwidth & response determined by frequencies of individual crystals.

R


Filters and impedance matching19

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Crystal filters.

    • Jones filter.

      • Variable-bandwidth crystal ladder filter.

      • Invented by Lee J. Jones, WB4JTR, of Ten-Tec.

R


Filters and impedance matching20

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Crystal filters.

    • Jones filter.

NOTE: The question pool (E6E12) mistakenly refers to the Jones filter as a crystal lattice filter when in fact, it is a crystal ladder filter.

R


Amateur extra license class

E6E01 -- What is a crystal lattice filter?

A power supply filter made with interlaced quartz crystals

An audio filter made with four quartz crystals that resonate at 1-kHz intervals

A filter with wide bandwidth and shallow skirts made using quartz crystals

A filter with narrow bandwidth and steep skirts made using quartz crystals

R


Amateur extra license class

E6E02 -- Which of the following factors has the greatest effect in helping determine the bandwidth and response shape of a crystal ladder filter?

The relative frequencies of the individual crystals

The DC voltage applied to the quartz crystal

The gain of the RF stage preceding the filter

The amplitude of the signals passing through the filter


Amateur extra license class

E6E12 -- What is a "Jones filter" as used as part of a HF receiver IF stage?

An automatic notch filter

A variable bandwidth crystal lattice filter

A special filter that emphasizes image responses

A filter that removes impulse noise


Filters and impedance matching21

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Active filters.

    • Active audio filters

      • Can be built without inductors.

      • Smaller & lighter.

      • No insertion loss & can have gain.

      • Op-amps.

        • Filter characteristics determined by external components.

        • Ringing can result if gain and/or Q are too high.

      • Best suited for audio filtering in receivers.

A


Filters and impedance matching22

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Active filters.

    • Active audio filters.

      • An active band-pass filter.

A


Filters and impedance matching23

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Active filters.

    • Active audio filters

      • Pick standard value capacitors.

        • Low-loss.

        • Temperature stable.

        • Polystyrene (?).

      • Calculate resistors.

A


Amateur extra license class

E7G01 -- What primarily determines the gain and frequency characteristics of an op-amp RC active filter?

The values of capacitors and resistors built into the op-amp

The values of capacitors and resistors external to the op-amp

The input voltage and frequency of the op-amp's DC power supply

The output voltage and smoothness of the op-amp's DC power supply


Amateur extra license class

E7G03 -- Which of the following is an advantage of using an op-amp instead of LC elements in an audio filter?

Op-amps are more rugged

Op-amps are fixed at one frequency

Op-amps are available in more varieties than are LC elements

Op-amps exhibit gain rather than insertion loss


Amateur extra license class

E7G04 -- Which of the following is a type of capacitor best suited for use in high-stability op-amp RC active filter circuits?

Electrolytic

Disc ceramic

Polystyrene

Paper


Amateur extra license class

E7G05 -- How can unwanted ringing and audio instability be prevented in a multi-section op-amp RC audio filter circuit?

Restrict both gain and Q

Restrict gain, but increase Q

Restrict Q, but increase gain

Increase both gain and Q


Amateur extra license class

E7G06 -- Which of the following is the most appropriate use of an op-amp active filter?

As a high-pass filter used to block RFI at the input to receivers

As a low-pass filter used between a transmitter and a transmission line

For smoothing power-supply output

As an audio filter in a receiver


Filters and impedance matching24

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP) Filters.

    • No tuning required.

    • No worry about selecting standard component values.

    • Adaptive processing.

      • Software can recognize & adapt to different signals & conditions.

R


Filters and impedance matching25

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Digital Signal Processing (DSP) Filters.

    • Can build filters impossible to achieve with hardware.

      • “Brick wall” filters approach shape factors of 1.0.

Filter Characteristics

6dB Bandwidth 2587 Hz,

60dB Bandwidth 2756 Hz

Shape Factor ~1.06

R


Amateur extra license class

E7C08 -- What kind of digital signal processing audio filter might be used to remove unwanted noise from a received SSB signal?

An adaptive filter

A crystal-lattice filter

A Hilbert-transform filter

A phase-inverting filter


Filters and impedance matching26

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Impedance Matching.

    • If load & source impedances are not equal, an impedance matching network is needed for maximum power transfer.

    • Assuming a source impedance of 50Ω, the matching network must:

      • Cancel the reactive portion of the load impedance.

      • Transform the resistive component to 50Ω.

R


Filters and impedance matching27

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Impedance Matching.

    • L Networks.

      • Can match virtually any 2 impedances.

      • Q is fixed.

      • Usually only designed to work on a single band.

R


Filters and impedance matching28

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Impedance Matching.

    • Pi-Networks.

      • Equivalent to 2 L-networks connected back-to-back.

      • Matches wide range of load impedances.

      • Q can be varied depending on component values chosen.

      • Used in most modern tube amplifiers.

R


Filters and impedance matching29

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Impedance Matching.

    • Pi-Networks.

      • Adjust CTune for minimum plate current.

      • Adjust CLoad for maximum permissible plate current.

      • Repeat.

R


Filters and impedance matching30

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Impedance Matching.

    • Pi-L networks.

      • More harmonic reduction.

R


Filters and impedance matching31

Filters and Impedance Matching

  • Impedance Matching.

    • T-Networks.

      • High-pass filter.

      • Can match wide range of impedances.

      • Lower loss than pi-network.

      • Used in most antenna tuners.

R


Amateur extra license class

E7B09 -- Which of the following describes how the loading and tuning capacitors are to be adjusted when tuning a vacuum tube RF power amplifier that employs a pi-network output circuit?

The loading capacitor is set to maximum capacitance and the tuning capacitor is adjusted for minimum allowable plate current

The tuning capacitor is set to maximum capacitance and the loading capacitor is adjusted for minimum plate permissible current

The loading capacitor is adjusted to minimum plate current while alternately adjusting the tuning capacitor for maximum allowable plate current

The tuning capacitor is adjusted for minimum plate current, while the loading capacitor is adjusted for maximum permissible plate current

R


Amateur extra license class

E7C01 -- How are the capacitors and inductors of a low-pass filter Pi-network arranged between the network's input and output?

Two inductors are in series between the input and output, and a capacitor is connected between the two inductors and ground

Two capacitors are in series between the input and output and an inductor is connected between the two capacitors and ground

An inductor is connected between the input and ground, another inductor is connected between the output and ground, and a capacitor is connected between the input and output

A capacitor is connected between the input and ground, another capacitor is connected between the output and ground, and an inductor is connected between input and output


Amateur extra license class

E7C02 -- A T-network with series capacitors and a parallel shunt inductor has which of the following properties?

It is a low-pass filter

It is a band-pass filter

It is a high-pass filter

It is a notch filter


Amateur extra license class

E7C03 -- What advantage does a Pi-L-network have over a Pi-network for impedance matching between the final amplifier of a vacuum-tube transmitter and an antenna?

Greater harmonic suppression

Higher efficiency

Lower losses

Greater transformation range


Amateur extra license class

E7C04 -- How does an impedance-matching circuit transform a complex impedance to a resistive impedance?

It introduces negative resistance to cancel the resistive part of impedance

It introduces transconductance to cancel the reactive part of impedance

It cancels the reactive part of the impedance and changes the resistive part to a desired value

Network resistances are substituted for load resistances and reactances are matched to the resistances


Amateur extra license class

E7C11 -- Which of the following is the common name for a filter network which is equivalent to two L networks connected back-to-back with the inductors in series and the capacitors in shunt at the input and output?

Pi-L

Cascode

Omega

Pi


Amateur extra license class

E7C12 -- Which of the following describes a Pi-L network used for matching a vacuum-tube final amplifier to a 50-ohm unbalanced output?

A Phase Inverter Load network

A Pi network with an additional series inductor on the output

A network with only three discrete parts

A matching network in which all components are isolated from ground


Amateur extra license class

E7C13 -- What is one advantage of a Pi matching network over an L matching network consisting of a single inductor and a single capacitor?

The Q of Pi networks can be varied depending on the component values chosen

L networks can not perform impedance transformation

Pi networks have fewer components

Pi networks are designed for balanced input and output


Power supplies

Power Supplies

  • Linear Voltage Regulators.

    • Shunt Regulators.

      • Lousy efficiency.

      • Constant current drawn from source.

      • Maximum current flows all the time.

    • Series Regulators.

      • Good efficiency.

      • Only the current required by the load flows.

A


Power supplies1

Power Supplies

  • Linear Voltage Regulators.

    • Basic series regulator circuit.

      • C1 -- Input by-pass capacitor.

        • Filters supply voltage.

      • C2 – Hum-filter capacitor.

        • Bypasses hum around D1.

      • C3 – Output by-pass capacitor.

        • Often 2 capacitors in parallel.

          • Large value capacitor to filter output.

          • Small value capacitor to prevent

            self-oscillation.

A


Power supplies2

Power Supplies

  • Linear Voltage Regulators.

    • Basic series regulator circuit.

      • D1 – Zener diode.

        • Provides voltage reference.

      • Q1 – Series pass transistor.

        • Increases current handling capability of regulator.

A


Power supplies3

Power Supplies

  • Linear Voltage Regulators.

    • Basic series regulator circuit.

      • R1 – Bias resistor.

        • Provides bias current to D1 & Q1.

      • R2 – Load resistor.

        • Provides minimum load current for Q1

A


Power supplies4

Power Supplies

  • Linear Voltage Regulators.

    • IC “3-Terminal” Regulators.

      • Thermal shutdown.

      • Overvoltage protection.

      • Foldback current limiting.

      • LM78Lxx -- 100 mA.

      • LM78xx -- 1 Amp.

      • LM78Hxx -- 3 Amps.

A


Power supplies5

Power Supplies

  • Linear Voltage Regulators.

    • Efficiency.

      • Both shunt & series regulators dissipate a significant amount of power as heat.

        • Series regulators are more efficient because only current required by the load is drawn.

      • Efficiency = 100% x POut / PIn

A


Amateur extra license class

E7D01 -- What is one characteristic of a linear electronic voltage regulator?

It has a ramp voltage as its output

It eliminates the need for a pass transistor

The control element duty cycle is proportional to the line or load conditions

The conduction of a control element is varied to maintain a constant output voltage


Amateur extra license class

E7D03 -- What device is typically used as a stable reference voltage in a linear voltage regulator?

A Zener diode

A tunnel diode

An SCR

A varactor diode


Amateur extra license class

E7D04 -- Which of the following types of linear voltage regulator usually make the most efficient use of the primary power source?

A series current source

A series regulator

A shunt regulator

A shunt current source


Amateur extra license class

E7D05 -- Which of the following types of linear voltage regulator places a constant load on the unregulated voltage source?

A constant current source

A series regulator

A shunt current source

A shunt regulator


Amateur extra license class

E7D06 -- What is the purpose of Q1 in the circuit shown in Figure E7-3?

It provides negative feedback to improve regulation

It provides a constant load for the voltage source

It increases the current-handling capability of the regulator

It provides D1 with current


Amateur extra license class

E7D07 -- What is the purpose of C2 in the circuit shown in Figure E7-3?

A. It bypasses hum around D1

B. It is a brute force filter for the output

C. To self-resonate at the hum frequency

D. To provide fixed DC bias for Q1


Amateur extra license class

E7D08 -- What type of circuit is shown in Figure E7-3?

Switching voltage regulator

Grounded emitter amplifier

Linear voltage regulator

Emitter follower


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E7D09 -- What is the purpose of C1 in the circuit shown in Figure E7-3?

It resonates at the ripple frequency

It provides fixed bias for Q1

It decouples the output

It filters the supply voltage


Amateur extra license class

E7D10 -- What is the purpose of C3 in the circuit shown in Figure E7-3?

It prevents self-oscillation

It provides brute force filtering of the output

It provides fixed bias for Q1

It clips the peaks of the ripple


Amateur extra license class

E7D11 -- What is the purpose of R1 in the circuit shown in Figure E7-3?

It provides a constant load to the voltage source

It couples hum to D1

It supplies current to D1

It bypasses hum around D1


Amateur extra license class

E7D12 -- What is the purpose of R2 in the circuit shown in Figure E7-3?

It provides fixed bias for Q1

It provides fixed bias for D1

It decouples hum from D1

It provides a constant minimum load for Q1


Amateur extra license class

E7D13 -- What is the purpose of D1 in the circuit shown in Figure E7-3?

To provide line voltage stabilization

To provide a voltage reference

Peak clipping

Hum filtering


Power supplies6

Power Supplies

  • Switching Regulators

    • AC input is rectified & switched on/off at a high frequency.

      • Pulse width is varied to maintain constant average voltage.

    • A transformer changes the voltage level.

    • Output from transformer is rectified & filtered.

    • Output is sampled & compared to a reference.

    • Difference is used to control the pulse width.

A


Power supplies7

Power Supplies

  • Switching Regulators

A


Power supplies8

Power Supplies

  • Switching Regulators

    • More efficient than linear regulators.

      • Regulation accomplished by varying duty-cycle of input power rather than by dissipating excess power as heat.

    • Smaller, lighter, & less expensive than linear regulators.

      • High switching rate allows use of smaller transformers & filter components.

A


Amateur extra license class

E7D02 -- What is one characteristic of a switching electronic voltage regulator?

The resistance of a control element is varied in direct proportion to the line voltage or load current

It is generally less efficient than a linear regulator

The control device’s duty cycle is controlled to produce a constant average output voltage

It gives a ramp voltage at its output


Amateur extra license class

E7D17 -- What is the primary reason that a high-frequency inverter type high-voltage power supply can be both less expensive and lighter in weight than a conventional power supply?

The inverter design does not require any output filtering

It uses a diode bridge rectifier for increased output

The high frequency inverter design uses much smaller transformers and filter components for an equivalent power output

It uses a large power-factor compensation capacitor to create "free power” from the unused portion of the AC cycle


Power supplies9

Power Supplies

  • High Voltage Techniques.

    • Bleeder resistor.

      • Discharges capacitors when power is turned off.

      • Improves voltage regulation by providing a minimum load current.

    • Voltage equalizing resistors.

      • Equalizes voltages across filter capacitors in series.

A


Power supplies10

Power Supplies

  • High Voltage Techniques.

    • Step-start.

      • Resistor in series with transformer primary.

      • Relay shorts resistor after specified time.

      • Limits in-rush current.

      • Reduces stress on rectifiers & filter capacitors by limiting in-rush current.

        • Capacitors charge more slowly.

A


Amateur extra license class

E7D14 -- What is one purpose of a "bleeder" resistor in a conventional (unregulated) power supply?

To cut down on waste heat generated by the power supply

To balance the low-voltage filament windings

To improve output voltage regulation

To boost the amount of output current


Amateur extra license class

E7D15 -- What is the purpose of a "step-start" circuit in a high-voltage power supply?

To provide a dual-voltage output for reduced power applications

To compensate for variations of the incoming line voltage

To allow for remote control of the power supply

To allow the filter capacitors to charge gradually


Amateur extra license class

E7D16 -- When several electrolytic filter capacitors are connected in series to increase the operating voltage of a power supply filter circuit, why should resistors be connected across each capacitor?

To equalize, as much as possible, the voltage drop across each capacitor

To provide a safety bleeder to discharge the capacitors when the supply is off

To provide a minimum load current to reduce voltage excursions at light loads

All of these choices are correct


Questions

Questions?


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