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Water Scarcity in Gurgaon Presentation by. Shri R.S. Rathee , President GURGAON CITIZENS COUNCIL. INTRODUCTION.

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water scarcity in gurgaon presentation by

Water Scarcity in Gurgaon Presentation by

Shri R.S. Rathee, President

GURGAON CITIZENS COUNCIL

introduction
INTRODUCTION
  • Gurgaon has no natural source of water but from time immemorial its inhabitants have been storing rainwater in bunds and talabs, the remnants of which can be seen all over. It is unfortunate that the authorities and town planners completely ignored this native wisdom. Not only did they destroy the bunds, they diverted the rain water into nallahs which take it away from the area. We are not far from a crisis situation wherein the ground water will be depleted to precarious levels and supply by the authorities will be grossly adequate to meet the requirements of Gurgaon, which is witnessing manifold growth. Gurgaon has been blessed with the Aravalli ranges, which should be utilised to the optimum for rainwater harvesting.
different parts of gurgaon

DIFFERENT PARTS OF GURGAON

OLD CITY AND 36 VILLAGES

NEW GURGAON: PRIVATE BUILDERS AND HUDA SECTORS – SECTOR 1 TO SECTOR 57

SECTORS 58 TO 67 (GOLF COURSE EXTENSION)

SECTORS 71 TO 98(AROUND NH8)

SECTORS 99 TO 115 (AROUND Dwarka Expressway)

sectors 58 to 67 golf course extension
SECTORS 58 TO 67 (GOLF COURSE EXTENSION)

AFTER THESE SECTORS ARE COMPLETED IN 2015

sectors 68 to 98 around nh 8
SECTORS 68 TO 98 AROUND NH 8

AFTER THESE SECTORS ARE COMPLETED IN 2021

sectors 98 to 115 around new dwarka express way
SECTORS 98 TO 115 (AROUND NEW DWARKA EXPRESS WAY)

AFTER THESE SECTORS ARE COMPLETED IN 2025

solutions page 1
SOLUTIONS- PAGE 1

Rainwater Harvesting :

  • Average rainfall in Gurgaon in the last 10 years is 600 mm or about 110 MGD.
  • All (i) Government buildings, (ii) Commercial Complexes, and (iii) Multi-storeyed residential complexes must have rainwater harvesting system in place immediately.
  • Rooftop water harvesting in individual houses must be done through storm water drains. All run-off should be collected in reservoirs, treated and distributed.

Sector-wise water harvesting :

  • There should be sector-wise water harvesting by HUDA and private developers.
  • For example, rainfall run-off in DLF City Phases I, IV and V can be pumped back to the nearby forest area.
  • Parks are the ideal sites for providing rainwater harvesting stations to inject the run-off from the roads. Other vacant spaces can also be used for this.
solutions page 2
SOLUTIONS- PAGE 2

Recycling of sewage :

  • Total recycling of sewage water from Gurgaon and other towns will also indirectly save the ground water table from further decline. Sewage flow of Gurgaon is about 100 cusecs which can be utilized for irrigation of 10,000 acres, which will further save water drawn from 1,000 tube-wells.
  • Same process should be implemented in other districts of Haryana so that Gurgaon gets adequate water supply from the Western Jamuna Canal (WJC).

Solar panels on Western Jamuna Canal:

  • GUJARAT has successfully installed solar panels on the Narmada Canal. This not only generates electricity but also prevents evaporation and pilferage.
  • A lot of water can be saved in this manner by covering WJC with solar panels.

Dams:

  • Three dams, Kesao dam (across river Tons), Lakhwar dam, (across river Yamuna) and Renuka dam (across river Giri), should be built.
  • This is the ultimate solution to mitigate the problem of water scarcity not only in Gurgaon, but in the entire state of Haryana.
slide13

SOLUTIONS PAGE 3..LAKES

In BHOPAL two man-made lakes were created from the 11th century onwards. Its Upper lake or BadaTalao is the biggest man-made lake in Asia.

  • Similarly, lakes can be made in several locations on either side of the Aravalli ranges in Gurgaon. No thought has ever been given to this aspect by modern town planners.
  • Already, Ghata Bund which existed for centuries, has been swallowed by real estate development. Now the water from the Aravalli Range flows in all directions and also destroys Golf Course Extension Road that connects Faridabad Road with Sohna Road. All this water must be used creatively and sagaciously.
  • Gurgaon Citizens’ Council proposes lakes in Gurgaon at (i) Sector 42 alongside Golf Course Road, and (ii) Sector 58 close to where Ghata Bund was located. Every bit of water that runs off the Aravalli ranges must be tapped and stored

In Udaipur seven big and small man-made lakes were carved out from the 15th. Man-made lakes have played a major role in the supply of water to several cities to 19th century

conclusion
CONCLUSION:
  •  Already Gurgaon is reached a crisis point as regards water supply. All the measures suggested should be implemented immediately.
  • Further, there should be no new master plan or sectors of Gurgaon after this for many years.
  • On the other hand, all the empty plots, residential, commercial, institutional and industrial, must be built up within 15 years of allotment.
  • Where 15 years have passed, all plots must be built up within the next three years.
  • This is to prevent unnecessary spread of urban areas, speculation in land prices and destroying of valuable agricultural land.
  • Consolidation, and not expansion, must be the watchword from now onwards. 
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