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Gifted Education Program Design and Administration. Dr. Barbara L. Branch Branch Consulting. Objectives. Wednesday Rationale for providing gifted education Statistical Rationale Rights of the Gifted Child Myths and Realities State Law, Federal Law NCLB Assignment Thursday NCLB Reports

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Gifted education program design and administration

Gifted Education Program Design and Administration

Dr. Barbara L. Branch

Branch Consulting


Objectives

Objectives

  • Wednesday

    • Rationale for providing gifted education

    • Statistical Rationale

    • Rights of the Gifted Child

    • Myths and Realities

    • State Law, Federal Law

    • NCLB Assignment

  • Thursday

    • NCLB Reports

    • Budgets

    • Intelligence

    • Identification

    • Program Options

    • Reflection Paper


Gifted education program design and administration

Here’s a puzzle to test your ability to find a pattern and test it against more data.

In this table, each row across follows the same pattern of numbers. See if you can discern the pattern and fill in the missing number in the bottom row. For added challenge (or competition), time how long it takes you to complete the puzzle.

Executive functions, like planning, and spatial processing are handled by your frontal lobes.


Gifted education program design and administration

Have you solved it yet? If not, here’s a hint:

If you read your figures like words in the West,then multiply your efforts and subtract the rest.

http://www.sharpbrains.com/blog/2006/11/22/pattern-recognition-brain-teaser/


Rationale for providing gifted services

Rationale for Providing Gifted Services


Gifted education program design and administration

Wordstorm

  • Each team has a flip chart paper with a word in the middle.

  • Person number one on each team walks to their team paper and writes a word related to the original word.

  • Person one passes the marker to the next person on the team. Each person in turn adds a word related to the original word.

  • Wait for a signal for round two, three, etc.

  • In your group, organize your words into groups that go together and label the groups


Why should gifted students be supported

Why Should Gifted Students Be Supported?

  • “Gifted and talented” is not always viewed very positively

    • Isn’t it elitist? Offends our egalitarian sensibilities

    • Democracy butts heads with intellectualism

    • Does superior intellect make us uncomfortable?


Why should gifted students be supported1

Why Should Gifted Students Be Supported?

  • Doesn’t it stigmatize kids or label kids?

  • Is it fair to other students?

  • Isn’t it just kids who get more field trips and special treatment like after-school programs?


Why should gifted students be supported2

Why Should Gifted Students Be Supported?

Numerous studies confirm a sad finding:

  • Gifted students in the US have little good to say about their schooling.

  • Are usually bored and unengaged in school

  • Tend to be highly critical of their teachers

  • Are asked to learn independently too often.

Ellen Winner


Rationale for providing gifted services1

Rationale for Providing Gifted Services

Every child has a right to a free and appropriate public education at his or her level

All youngsters need appropriate

peers and friends

If improperly nurtured and educated, gifted youngsters can become a powerful negative force in society

Dr. Victoria Gardner Placker, B.A.Ed., M.S., R.Sc.P., Rs.D.

http://www.angelfire.com/ne/cre8vityunltd/futrgifted.html


Rationale for providing gifted services2

Rationale for Providing Gifted Services

24% of drop outs are gifted

Many of the prisoners on death row have IQ's over 130

Think of the havoc wrecked upon our society by Ted Bundy, Charles Manson, and Ted Kaczynski.

Dr. Victoria Gardner Placker, B.A.Ed., M.S., R.Sc.P., Rs.D.

http://www.angelfire.com/ne/cre8vityunltd/futrgifted.html


Who s profile is this

Who’s Profile is This?

100% Male

75% Caucasian

Middle Class

Average age 16

33% Loner/social outcast

25% Members of alienated group

All attend public school

41% earning A’s and B’s

63% No history of serious school/conduct problems

75% Felt bullied, threatened, attacked, by others

Final Report of the Safe School Initiative, US Secret Service and US Dept. of Educ., 2002, http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/msnbc/Sections/NEWS/PDFs/061002_Safe_Schools.pdf


Rationale for providing gifted services3

Rationale for Providing Gifted Services

Gifted children have specific behavioral characteristics in the cognitive and affective realms that present special learning needs that must be addressed by curriculum differentiation

Van Tassel-Baska, 1998


Why our nation needs to educate our gifted and talented youth

Why our Nation Needs to Educate our Gifted and Talented Youth

  • About one-third of all jobs in the United States require science or technology competency, but currently only 17 percent of Americans graduate with science or technology majors … in China, fully 52 percent of college degrees awarded are in science and technology. (William R. Brody, president of Johns Hopkins University, Congressional testimony 7/05)

  • Only 11 percent of bachelor’s degrees in the United States are in the sciences or engineering, compared with 23 percent in the rest of the world and 50 percent in China. (National Summit on Competitiveness 12/05)


Why our nation needs to educate our gifted and talented youth1

Why our Nation Needs to Educate our Gifted and Talented Youth

  • In the fourth grade, U.S. students score above the international average in math and near first in science. At eighth grade, they score below average in math, and only slightly above average in science. By 12th grade, U.S. students are near the bottom of a 49-country survey in both math and science, outscoring only Cyprus and South Africa.

  • Less than 15 percent of U.S. students have the prerequisites even to pursue scientific or technical degrees in college.

(William R. Brody, president of Johns Hopkins University, Congressional testimony 7/05)


Why our nation needs to educate our gifted and talented youth2

Why our Nation Needs to Educate our Gifted and Talented Youth

  • China graduates about 500,000 engineers per year, while  India produces 200,000 and the United States turns out a mere 70,000. (National Academy  of Sciences: “Rising Above the Gathering Storm” 10/05)

  • The United States in 1970 produced more than half of the world’s Ph.D.s. But if patterns continue, it will be lucky to produce 15 percent of the world’s doctorates by 2010. (National Bureau of Economic Research 5/05)


Why our nation needs to educate our gifted and talented youth3

Why our Nation Needs to Educate our Gifted and Talented Youth

  • 45% of new U.S. patents are granted now to foreigners. (Education Week “A Quiet Crisis is Clouding the Future of R&D” 5/25/05)

  • Only three of the top 10 recipients of U.S. patents in 2003 were American companies. (National Academy of Sciences: “Rising Above the Gathering Storm” 10/05)


Why our nation needs to educate our gifted and talented youth4

Why our Nation Needs to Educate our Gifted and Talented Youth

  • 88% of high school dropouts had passing grades, but dropped out due to boredom. (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation: “The Silent Epidemic” 3/06)

  • Up to 20 percent of high school dropouts test in the gifted range. (Handbook for Gifted Education, 2003


Rationale for providing gifted services4

Rationale for Providing Gifted Services

We need gifted people to deal with our world's problems, and they need to be appropriately educated and emotionally healthy to do so!

Our future depends on them!

Dr. Victoria Gardner Placker, B.A.Ed., M.S., R.Sc.P., Rs.D.

http://www.angelfire.com/ne/cre8vityunltd/futrgifted.html


Gifted education program design and administration

A blind beggar had a brother who died. What relation wasthe blind beggar to the brother who died?“Brother” is not the answer.

http://www.sharpbrains.com/blog/2006/10/20/brain-puzzle-for-the-whole-brain-the-blind-beggar/


Statistical rationale

Statistical Rationale


Sac city data

Sac City Data


Sac city data1

Sac City Data

Sacramento City Unified School District


Gifted education program design and administration

Stanislaus County GATE CST Scores Spring 2009

English Language Arts

Who are these kids by name?

www.cde.ca.gov/ds


Stanislaus county gate cst scores spring 2009 mathematics

Stanislaus County GATE CST Scores Spring 2009Mathematics

www.cde.ca.gov/ds


Stanislaus county gate cst scores 2009 algebra i

Stanislaus County GATE CST Scores 2009 Algebra I

www.cde.ca.gov/ds


Gifted education program design and administration

Questions to Ask of Your Data

  • Who are the students in proficient or below by name.

  • Why aren’t they in advanced?

  • Do they have challenging curriculum in each grade level?

  • How many gifted students are not in honors or AP? Why not?

www.cde.ca.gov/ds


Gifted education program design and administration

http://www.sharpbrains.com/blog/2006/09/17/brain-exercise-draw-the-face-of-a-penny-please/


Gifted education program design and administration

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

Read and discuss with your neighbor. Do you agree with all of the declarations?  

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997eighbor.


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child1

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to engage in appropriate educational experiences even when other children of that grade level or age are unable to profit from the experience.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child2

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to be grouped and to interact with other gifted children for some part of their learning experience so that they may be understood, engaged, and challenged.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child3

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to be taught rather than to be used as a tutor or teaching assistant for a significant part of the school day.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child4

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to be presented with new, advanced, and challenging ideas and concepts regardless of the material and resources that have been designated for the age group or grade level in which the child was placed.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child5

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to be taught concepts that the child does not yet know instead of relearning old concepts that the child has already shown evidence of mastering.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child6

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to learn faster than age peers and to have that pace of learning respected and provided for.

It is the right of a gifted child to think in alternative ways, produce diverse products, and to bring intuition and innovation to the learning experience.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child7

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to be idealistic and sensitive to fairness, justice, accuracy and the global problems facing humankind and to have a forum for expressing these concerns.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child8

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to question generalizations, offer alternative solutions, and value complex and profound levels of thought.

It is the right of a gifted child to be intense, persistent, and goal-directed in the pursuit of knowledge.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child9

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to express a sense of humor that is unusual, playful, and often complex.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child10

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to hold high expectations for self and others and to be sensitive to inconsistencies between ideals and behavior, with the need to have help in seeing the value in human differences.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child11

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to be a high achiever in some areas of the curriculum and not in others, making thoughtful knowledgeable academic placement a necessity.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child12

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to have a low tolerance for the lag between vision and actualization, between personal standards and developed skill, and between physical maturity and athletic ability.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


A declaration of the educational rights of the gifted child13

A Declaration of the Educational Rights of the Gifted Child

It is the right of a gifted child to pursue interests that are beyond the ability of age peers, are outside the grade level curriculum, or involve areas as yet unexplored or unknown.

Dr. Barbara Clark, Growing Up Gifted, Prentice Hall, Inc., 1997


Plexers

Plexers


Myths and realities

Myths and Realities


Activity

Activity

Complete Distinguishing Myths from Realities Quiz with at least one partner – discuss each before you decide what to answer


Myths

  • Cooperative learning can be substituted for specialized programs and services for academically talented students

  • Gifted students have lower self-esteem than non-gifted students

  • Gifted children can get a good education on their own

Myths


Zone of proximal development

Dependent

Independent

Zone of Proximal Development

  • The gap between what a learner can accomplish independently and what a learner cannot do, even with assistance.

Too Hard

Just Right

Too Easy


Zone of proximal development1

Dependent

Dependent

Dependent

Independent

Dependent

Independent

Independent

Independent

Independent

Independent

Zone of Proximal Development

Gifted Child

High-achiever

Average Children


Myths1

Myths

  • Gifted students are a homogeneous group, all high achievers.

  • Gifted students do not need help. If they are really gifted, they can manage on their own.

  • Gifted students have fewer problems than others because their intelligence and abilities somehow exempt them from the hassles of daily life.


Myths2

Myths

  • The future of a gifted student is assured: a world of opportunities lies before the student.

  • Gifted students are self-directed; they know where they are heading.


Myths3

Myths

  • The social and emotional development of the gifted student is at the same level as his or her intellectual development.

  • Gifted students are nerds and social isolates.


Myths4

Myths

  • The primary value of the gifted student lies in his or her brain power.

  • The gifted student's family always prizes his or her abilities.

  • Gifted students need to serve as examples to others and they should always assume extra responsibility.


Myths5

Myths

  • Gifted students make everyone else smarter.

  • Gifted students can accomplish anything they put their minds to. All they have to do is apply themselves.

  • Gifted students are naturally creative and do not need encouragement.

  • Gifted children are easy to raise and a welcome addition to anyclassroom.


Realities

Realities

  • Gifted students are often perfectionistic and idealistic. They may equate achievement and grades with self-esteem and self-worth, which sometimes leads to fear of failure and interferes with achievement.

  • Gifted students may experience heightened sensitivity to their own expectations and those of others, resulting in guilt over achievements or grades perceived to be low.


Realities1

Realities

  • Gifted students are asynchronous. Their chronological age, social, physical, emotional, and intellectual development may all be at different levels. For example, a 5-year-old may be able to read and comprehend a third-grade book but may not be able to write legibly.

  • Gifted students may be so far ahead of their chronological age mates that they know more than half the curriculum before the school year begins! Their boredom can result in low achievement and low grades.


Realities2

Realities

  • Some gifted children are "mappers" (sequential learners), while others are "leapers" (spatial learners).

    • Leapers may not know how they got a "right answer."

    • Mappers may get lost in the steps leading to the right answer.


Realities3

Realities

  • Gifted children are problem solvers. They benefit from working on open-ended, interdisciplinary problems; for example, how to solve a shortage of community resources.

  • Gifted students often refuse to work for grades alone.


Realities4

Realities

  • Gifted students often think abstractly and with such complexity that they may need help with concrete study- and test-taking skills. They may not be able to select one answer in a multiple choice question because they see how all the answers might be correct.


Realities5

Realities

  • Gifted students who do well in school may define success as getting an "A" and failure as any grade less than an "A."

  • By early adolescence they may be unwilling to try anything where they are not certain of guaranteed success.


How smart is your right foot

How smart is Your Right Foot?

1.  While sitting where you are at your desk in front of your computer, lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise circles.

2.  Now, while doing this, draw the number '6' in the air with your right hand. 


State law federal law and nclb

State Law Federal Law and NCLB


Federal definition of giftedness

Federal Definition of Giftedness

  • Children and youth with outstanding talent perform or show the potential for performance at remarkably high levels of accomplishment when compared with others of their age, experience, or environment.

  • These children and youth exhibit high performance capability in intellectual, creative, and/or artistic areas, possess an unusual leadership capacity, or excel in specific academic fields. They require services or activities not ordinarily provided by the schools.

  • Outstanding talents are present in children and youth from all cultural groups, across all economic strata, and in all areas of human endeavor.


Gifted education program design and administration

http://myfunteacher.com/plexers.htm


Nclb definition of gifted

NCLB Definition of Gifted

The definition of gifted and talented in NCLB is as follows:

The term 'gifted and talented', when used with respect to students, children, or youth, means students, children, or youth who give evidence of high achievement capability in areas such as intellectual, creative, artistic, or leadership capacity, or in specific academic fields, and who need services or activities not ordinarily provided by the school in order to fully develop those capabilities.

Title IX, Part A, Section 9101(22)Page 544


Title i improving the academic achievement of the disadvantaged

Title I Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged

Title I Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged

Part A - Improving Basic Programs Operated by LEAs

Section 1111 - State PlansStates are required to explain the method used to define "annual yearly progress" and may use a host of academic indicators, including changes in the percentage of students in gifted and talented, advanced placement, and college preparatory programs. (Section 1111(b)(2)(C)(vii)).(Page 24)


Title i improving the academic achievement of the disadvantaged1

Title I Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged

Part A - Improving Basic Programs Operated by LEAs

Section 1111 - State PlansStates are required to explain the method used to define "annual yearly progress" and may use a host of academic indicators, including changes in the percentage of students in gifted and talented, advanced placement, and college preparatory programs.

Section 1111(b)(2)(C)(vii)Page 24


Title ii preparing training recruiting high quality teachers principals

Title II Preparing, Training & Recruiting High Quality Teachers & Principals

Section 2122: Local application and needs assessment.

An LEA application for a sub-grant from the state must include an explanation of how the LEA will provide training to enable teachers to address the needs of students with different learning styles, particularly students with disabilities, with special learning needs (including students with gifts and talents)....

Section 2122(b)(9)(A)Page 210


Title v promoting informed parental choice and innovative programs

Title V Promoting Informed Parental Choice and Innovative Programs

Part A - Innovative Programs

Subpart 3 - Local Innovative Education Programs (Note: this is the local block grant section of the Act)Funds to LEAs shall be used for innovative assistance programs, which may include "programs to provide for the educational needs of gifted and talented children.“

Section 5131(a)(7)Page 363


Gifted education program design and administration

Jacob Javits Grant

http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oii/nonpublic/nclb/edlite-slide026.html


Title vii indian native hawaiian and alaska native education

Title VII Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native Education

Part A - Indian Education

Subpart 3 National ActivitiesSection 7134 is Gifted & Talented Indian Students(Page 510)

Part B - Native Hawaiian EducationSection 7205(a)(3)(E) is Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Students(Page 524)


Title x part c homeless education

Title X, Part C, Homeless Education

Section 1032 amends Subtitle B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act as follows:

Section 722(g)(4)(D) Grants for State and Local Activities:

Requires LEAs that receive funds under the McKinney Act to provide homeless children services comparable to services offered to other students in the school, including programs for gifted and talented students.(Page 584)

Section 723(d)(2) LEA sub-grants

Permits LEAs to use funds awarded through sub-grants from the state under the McKinney Act on expedited evaluations of the strengths and needs of homeless children, including needs and eligibility for gifted and talented programs and services(Page 588)


Stories with holes

Stories with Holes

John and Mary were laying dead in a puddle with broken glass. Chester wasn't found.

A man was found dead with 51 bicycles.

The man was afraid to go home, because the man with the mask was there.

www.storieswithholes.com/


Federal statistics

Federal Statistics

  • 25 states have a definition of giftedness from the legislature

  • 21 states have a definition of giftedness from the state agency

  • 4 states have no definition

  • 32 states mandate gifted education

  • On average states identify about 6% of the student population as gifted


Gifted education program design and administration

http://www.davidsongifted.org/db/


Federal numbers

Federal Numbers


California definition

California Definition

Each district shall use one or more of these categories in identifying pupils as gifted and talented in all categories, identification of a pupil’s extraordinary capability shall be in relation to the pupil’s chronological peers.

  • Intellectual Ability: A Pupil demonstrates extraordinary or potential for extraordinary intellectual development

  • Creative Ability: A Pupil characteristically:

    • Perceives unusual relationships among aspects of the pupil’s environment and among ideas;

    • Overcomes obstacles to thinking and doing;

    • Produces unique solutions to problems

  • Specific Academic Ability: A pupil functions at highly advanced academic levels in particular subject areas.

  • Leadership Ability: A pupil displays the characteristic behaviors necessary for extraordinary leadership.

  • High Achievement: A pupil consistently produces advanced ideas and products and/or attains exceptionally high scores on achievement tests.

  • Visual and Performing Arts Talent: A Pupil originates, performs, produces, or responds at extraordinarily high levels in the arts.

  • Any other category which meets the standards set forth in these regulations

    CAL CODE REGS, title 5, § 3822


History of gifted education in california

History of Gifted Education in California

  • MGM – 1961

  • GATE – 1980 – AB 1040

    • Districts set up own criteria

    • Expanded services beyond intellectually gifted

  • Updated GATE with standards - AB 2313

  • Title V of the State Code


  • Review of law in california ab 2313 september 2000

    Review of Law in CaliforniaAB 2313 – September 2000

    • Before AB 2313

      • 200 minutes per week for 30 weeks

      • Qualitatively different instruction

    • AB 2313

      • Calls for a differentiation of the core curriculum all day


    Recommended program standards

    Recommended Program Standards

    • Collaboration of CAG and CDE approved by State Board of Education

    • Standards for 1, 2 3, or 5 year plans for exemplary districts


    Recommended program standards1

    Recommended Program Standards

    • Components

      • Program Design

      • Identification

      • Curriculum and Instruction

      • Social & Emotional Development

      • Professional Development

      • Parent and Community Involvement

      • Program Assessment


    Coordinated compliance review background

    Coordinated Compliance Review Background

    • GATE not mandated in California

    • New law – AB 2313

    • Not part of the consolidated application but under CCR for the 8 years

    • Now part of CPM


    Activity no child left behind

    ActivityNo Child Left Behind

    What effect has NCLB had on gifted education?


    Road to the final nclb

    Road to the Final NCLB

    • All teams must advance to the Sweet 16, and all will win the championship. If a team does not win the championship, they will be on probation until they are the champions, and coaches will be held accountable.

    • All kids will be expected to have the same basketball skills at the same time and in the same conditions. No exceptions will be made for interest in basketball, a desire to perform athletically, or genetic abilities or disabilities. ALL KIDS WILL PLAY BASKETBALL AT A PROFICIENT LEVEL.


    Road to the final nclb1

    Road to the Final NCLB

    • Talented players will be asked to practice on their own, without instruction. This is because the coaches will be using all their instructional time with the athletes who aren't interested in basketball, have limited athletic ability or whose parents don't like basketball.

    • Games will be played year round, but statistics will only be kept in the 4th, 8th and 11th games.

    • This will create a New Age of sports where every school is expected to have the same level of talent and all teams will reach the same minimal goals. If no child gets ahead, then no child will be left behind.


    Thursday

    Thursday

    • Reports on NCLB

    • Budget

    • Intelligence

    • Identification

    • Program Options

    • Reflection Paper

    Day Two


    Activity gifted ed and nclb

    ActivityGifted Ed and NCLB

    Presentations and Research

    • The New Anti-intellectualism in America

    • Federal Law Drains Resources for the Gifted

    • Initiative to Leave No Child Behind Leaves Out Gifted

    • Proficiency is not Enough

    • Gifted Education and the No Child Left Behind Act

    • Are Gifted Children Being Left Behind?

    • In Era of Scores, Schools Fight Over Gifted Children

    • Read your article

    • Prepare a presentation to share information from your article

    • Take notes during presentations to prepare for your reflection paper due today.


    Change of heart or mind npr interview

    Change of Heart –or MindNPR Interview

    In 2005, former Assistant Secretary of Education Diane Ravitch wrote, "We should thank President George W. Bush and Congress for passing the No Child Left Behind Act ... All this attention and focus is paying off for younger students, who are reading and solving mathematics problems better than their parents' generation."


    Gifted education program design and administration

    Four years later, Ravitch has changed her mind."I was known as a conservative advocate of many of these policies," Ravitch says. "But I've looked at the evidence and I've concluded they're wrong. They've put us on the wrong track. I feel passionately about the improvement of public education and I don't think any of this is going to improve public education."


    Gifted education program design and administration

    “The basic strategy is measuring and punishing," Ravitch says of No Child Left Behind. "And it turns out as a result of putting so much emphasis on the test scores, there's a lot of cheating going on, there's a lot of gaming the system. Instead of raising standards it's actually lowered standards because many states have 'dumbed down' their tests or changed the scoring of their tests to say that more kids are passing than actually are."


    Gifted education program design and administration

    Some states contend that 80 to 90 percent of their children are proficient readers and have math proficiency as well, Ravitch notes. But in the same states, only 25 to 30 of the children test at a proficient level on national tests such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress.


    Gifted education program design and administration

    "There should not be an education marketplace, there should not be competition," Ravitch says. "Schools operate fundamentally — or should operate — like families. The fundamental principle by which education proceeds is collaboration. Teachers are supposed to share what works; schools are supposed to get together and talk about what's for them. They're not supposed to hide their trade secrets and have a survival of the fittest competition with the school down the block."


    Gifted education program design and administration

    Budgets


    Budgets and funding facts

    Budgets and Funding Facts


    California gate funding process

    California GATE Funding Process

    Total Apportionment

    Total ADA

    $55,344,989

    6,275,469 kids

    Each district received $8.82 per total ADA

    2008-2009

    =$8.82


    Flexibility

    Flexibility

    2010-2015

    • 23 funds including GATE are placed in a block grant.

    • Districts have flexibility to use the block grant of funds in any program

    • All categorical funds are cut 15%

    • An additional 4.9% cut this year

    • Districts can sweep carryover funds from this year


    Gifted education program design and administration

    California Education Budget


    Gifted education program design and administration

    Gifted Education Support Is Rare Find

    http://www.myfoxkc.com/myfox/


    Measuring intelligence

    Measuring Intelligence


    Intelligence test

    Intelligence Test

    1. On a standard traffic light, is the green on the top or bottom?

    2. In which hand is the Statue of Liberty's torch? What is in the other hand?

    3. What six colors are on the classic Campbell 's soup label ?


    Intelligence test1

    Intelligence Test

    4. What two numbers on the telephone dial don't have letters by them?

    5. When you walk does your left arm swing with your right or left leg? 

    6. How many matches are in a standard pack?

    7. On the United States flag is the top stripe red or white?


    Intelligence test2

    Intelligence Test

    8. What is the lowest number on the FM dial?

    9. How many channels on a VHF TV dial?

    10. On which side of a women's blouse are the buttons?

    11. How many sides does a stop sign have?

    12. Do books have even-numbered pages on the right or left side?


    Intelligence test3

    Intelligence Test

    13. How many lug nuts are on a standard car wheel?

    14. How many sides are there on a standard pencil?

    15. Sleepy, Happy, Sneezy, Grumpy, Dopey, Doc. Who's missing?


    Intelligence test4

    Intelligence Test

    16. How many hot dog buns are in a standard package?   

    17. There are 12 buttons on a touch tone phone. What 2 symbols bear no digits?

    18. How many curves are there in the standard paper clip?


    Intelligence

    Intelligence

    History of Intelligence


    Gifted education program design and administration

    Plucker, J. A. (Ed.). (2003). Human intelligence: Historical influences, current controversies, teaching resources. Retrieved [11/09/2004], from http://www.indiana.edu/~intell


    Phrenology

    Phrenology

    • 1758-1825


    Measuring intelligence craniometry 1849

    Measuring IntelligenceCraniometry 1849

    • Samuel George Morton, 1819-1850, devised a system of filling empty skulls with small seeds and then removing the seeds to measure the volume.


    Measuring intelligence craniometry 18491

    Measuring IntelligenceCraniometry 1849

    • Naturally, this required that the subjects be dead, and that the only "results" were comparative skull sizes of various groups, which led to hypotheses about those groups.

    • Paul Broca, 1824-1880, replaced the seeds with lead shot, but craniometry remained otherwise static for nearly a century.


    Galton 1822 1911 historiometry

    Galton1822-1911 Historiometry

    Measured reaction time and grip strength, and looked for a correlation between these measures and measures of success in endeavors thought to reflect intellectual ability, such as one's class rank in school or one's occupational level


    Measuring intelligence binet 1904

    Measuring IntelligenceBinet 1904

    • Binet, 1857-1911, a student of Broca’s, was commissioned in 1904 by the minister of public education in France to develop a method for identifying children who might benefit from special education curricula.


    Measuring intelligence binet 19041

    Measuring IntelligenceBinet 1904

    • Binet developed a series of tests related to common tasks involving reasoning, comprehension, invention and censure ..

    • In 1905, Binet published these tasks as the first Binet scale, and modern intelligence testing was born.


    Binet and simon 1908 1916

    Binet and Simon (1908/1916)

    • “We have sought to find the natural intelligence of the child, and not his degree of culture, his amount of instruction.

    • A very intelligent child may be deprived of instruction by circumstances foreign to his intelligence. He may have lived far from school; he may have had a long illness; …” (pp. 253-254).


    Measuring intelligence goddard

    Measuring IntelligenceGoddard

    • Just three years after Binet developed his scale, the test crossed the Atlantic and gave rise to the American eugenics movement.

    • Goddard began testing immigrants at New York's Ellis Island using his translation of the Binet scale. He found that forty percent of the immigrants fell into the newly formed "moron" class, which he and his colleagues believed was a group doomed to crime and poverty.


    Measuring intelligence stanford binet

    Measuring IntelligenceStanford-Binet

    • In 1916, Stanford professor Lewis M. Terman expanded the scale dramatically and gave it a new name-the Stanford-Binet.

    • It was to become the standard for mental testing in the twentieth century, and all tests that followed were really just variations.


    1917 army iq alpha test

    1917 Army IQ Alpha Test

    • Information

    • Practical Judgment

    • Arithmetical Problems

    • Synonyms-Antonyms

    • Disarranged Sentences

    • Number Series Completion

    • Analogies


    1917 army iq beta test

    1917 Army IQ Beta Test

    • Picture Completion

    • Maze

    • Cube Analysis

    • X-O Series

    • Digit Symbol

    • Number Checking

    • Geometrical Construction


    Verbal nonverbal intelligence

    Verbal -Nonverbal Intelligence?

    • Definition of intelligence:

      “The aggregate or global capacity of the individual to act purposefully, to think rationally, and to deal effectively with his environment (1939)”

    Wechsler based his test on the Army Mental Testing Program


    Wechsler scales

    Wechsler Scales

    • Performance IQ Scale is comprised of nonverbal and spatial tests

      • Block Design

      • Object Assembly

      • Picture Completion

      • Picture Arrangement

      • Coding (Digit Symbol)


    Wechsler intelligence scale

    Wechsler Intelligence Scale

    • Verbal IQ Scale is comprised of tests of verbal comprehension and verbal expression

      • Information

      • Similarities

      • Arithmetic

      • Vocabulary

      • Comprehension


    Intelligence test5

    Intelligence Test


    Answers

    ANSWERS

    • On a standard traffic light, is the green on the top or bottom?  BOTTOM

      2. In which hand is the Statue of Liberty's torch? RIGHT

      3. What six colors are on the classic Campbell 's soup label?    BLUE, RED, WHITE, YELLOW, BLACK & GOLD


    Answers1

    Answers

    4. What two numbers on the telephone dial don't have letters by them?  1, 0

    5. When you walk does your left arm swing with your right or left leg? RIGHT

    6. How many matches are in a standard pack?  20

    7. On the United States flag is the top stripe red or white?    RED


    Answers2

    Answers

    8. What is the lowest number on the FM dial?  88

    9. How many channels on a VHF TV dial?    12 (no #1)

    10. On which side of a women's blouse are the buttons?    LEFT

    11. How many sides does a stop sign have?    8

    12. Do books have even-numbered pages on the right or left side?    LEFT


    Answers3

    Answers

    13. How many lug nuts are on a standard car wheel?  5

    14. How many sides are there on a standard pencil?   6

    15. Sleepy, Happy, Sneezy, Grumpy, Dopey, Doc. Who's missing?    BASHFUL


    Answers4

    Answers

    16. How many hot dog buns are in a standard package?    8

    17. There are 12 buttons on a touch tone phone. What 2 symbols bear no digits?    *, #

    18. How many curves are there in the standard paper clip?    3


    Astounding

    Astounding

    The average person only gets 7 correct.


    Identification

    Identification

    • IQ tests –

      • WISC, Binet

    • Achievement Tests

      • CAT 6

      • CST

    • Non-verbal

      • Raven Progressive Matrices

      • Naglieri Progressive Matrices


    Identification1

    Identification

    • Creative

      • Torrance

    • Observation

      • June Maker

    • Portfolio


    Identification around the world

    Identification Around the World

    Share Cross-Cultural Identification Survey Results


    Why nonverbal tests

    Why Nonverbal Tests?

    • Appropriate for many children

    • Does not require verbal skills

    • Does not require achievement

    • Requires minimal motor skills

    • Allows ample time for responding

    • Can be given individually or in groups

    • More fair to minority populations

    • To find gifted children who are not achieving to their potential (David Mills, DPI North Carolina)


    Raven progressive matrices

    Raven Progressive Matrices

    • Designed to measure “mental activity [which] involves making meaning out of confusion…forming (largely non-verbal) constructs which facilitate the handling of complex problems involving many mutually dependent variables” (Raven, 1990, p. G3).

    • “Matrices measure the ability to educe relationships” (Raven, 1990, p. G4).


    Group test comparison

    Group Test Comparison

    Raven


    Group test comparison1

    Group Test Comparison

    Raven


    Group test comparison2

    Group Test Comparison

    Raven


    Group test comparison3

    Group Test Comparison

    Raven


    Raven progressive matrices1

    3 + - 4 = -1

    2 + 1 = 3

    5 + -3 = 2

    Raven Progressive Matrices


    Online examples of iq tests

    Online Examples of IQ Tests

    IQ Tests

    http://iqtest.dk/main.swf

    http://www.intelligencetest.com/index.htm


    Gifted education program design and administration

    NNAT

    • ‘The NNAT is a brief, culture-fair, nonverbal measure of ability

    • NNAT items assess ability without requiring the student to read, write, or speak

    • NNAT uses abstract figural designs, and does not rely on verbal skills or achievement


    Structure of nnat

    Seven levels

    38 items per level

    Each level was designed to have

    good ceiling / floor

    good reliability

    as many as four item clusters

    LevelGrades

    AK

    B1

    C2

    D3 & 4

    E5 & 6

    F7 - 9

    G10 - 12

    Structure of NNAT


    Group test comparison4

    Group Test Comparison

    NNAT


    Group administered tests

    Group Administered Tests

    NNAT


    Program options based on identification

    Program Options Based on identification


    Gifted program delivery models

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    What can schools do to help these students when they really care, but don’t have the funds?


    Gifted program delivery models1

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    Some gifted students may be candidates for early entrance to kindergarten, or possibly first grade if they are already reading.


    Gifted program delivery models2

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    Pre-assess gifted students before a unit or a course for mastery of the subject matter and offer a more advanced unit or course.

    Self-contained classes for gifted students, particularly in core curriculum classes, help them move on to more advanced subjects.


    Gifted program delivery models3

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    Multi-age, self-contained gifted classes are even more effective. Learning with intellectual peers encourages gifted students to achieve.


    Gifted program delivery models4

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    Subject acceleration is appropriate when a student is proficient in a particular subject.

    Consider grade acceleration when a student demonstrates proficiency at a particular grade level. Use the Iowa Acceleration Scale to evaluate this and other options.

    Subject

    Grade


    Gifted program delivery models5

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    Dual enrollment in middle or high school, or high school and college, offers challenging opportunities for gifted students.

    Middle School

    High School

    College


    Gifted program delivery models6

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    Offer Advanced Placement (AP) courses and/or International Baccalaureate (IB) programs for gifted students.

    Provide counselors who are trained to counsel gifted students, including advising them of talent development opportunities.


    Gifted program delivery models7

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    Advise students of Academic Talent Searches, scholarships and academic competitions and give students credit for the advanced courses they take in academic summer programs.


    Gifted program delivery models8

    Gifted Program Delivery Models

    Create a school culture that values intellectual discovery and achievements, where students encourage one another to accomplish more than they would on their own.

    Encourage administrators and teachers to educate themselves on the wide range of exceptional abilities among bright students and increase flexibility in addressing the individual learning needs of gifted


    Rationale for cluster grouping

    Rationale for Cluster Grouping

    • Placing high achievers together in one classroom challenges those students, enabling other students to become academic leaders and allowing new talent to emerge.

    Marcia Gentry


    Rationale for cluster grouping1

    Rationale for Cluster Grouping

    • Cluster grouping makes it easier for teachers to meet the needs of students in their classrooms by reducing the achievement range of students within a classroom.

    • Cluster grouping used in conjunction with challenging instruction and high teacher expectations may improve how teachers view their students with respect to ability and achievement.

    Marcia Gentry


    Rationale for cluster grouping2

    Rationale for Cluster Grouping

    • Achievement scores improved over a three-year period for students in a cluster group environment and the number of students identified as high achievers increased.

    Marcia Gentry


    Rationale for cluster grouping3

    Rationale for Cluster Grouping

    • Flexible grouping within and between classes that reduces the achievement range of each class can provide many benefits to all students and teachers.

    • The positive effects of cluster grouping result from many changes in the school climate such as:

    Marcia Gentry


    Rationale for cluster grouping4

    Rationale for Cluster Grouping

    • creating opportunities for staff development, emphasizing a variety of instructional strategies;

    • raising teacher expectations;

    • creating a sense of ownership;

    Marcia Gentry


    Rationale for cluster grouping5

    Rationale for Cluster Grouping

    • reducing the range of achievement levels in classrooms;

    • creating opportunities for collaboration with colleagues and administration.

    Marcia Gentry


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