DIRECT (QUOTED) SPEECH:
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DIRECT (QUOTED) SPEECH: Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. “Why aren’t my students here today?” he asked. INDIRECT (REPORTED) SPEECH: Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. He asked himself why his students weren’t there that day. FREE INDIRECT SPEECH:

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DIRECT (QUOTED) SPEECH:

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Direct quoted speech

DIRECT (QUOTED) SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. “Why aren’t my students here today?” he asked.

INDIRECT (REPORTED) SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. He asked himself why his students weren’t there that day.

FREE INDIRECT SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. Why weren’this students here today?


Direct quoted speech

DIRECT (QUOTED) SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. “Why aren’t my students heretoday?” he asked.

INDIRECT (REPORTED) SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. He asked himself why his students weren’t there that day.

FREE INDIRECT SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. Why weren’this students here today?


Direct quoted speech

DIRECT (QUOTED) SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. “Why aren’t my students heretoday?” he asked.

INDIRECT (REPORTED) SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. He asked himself why his students weren’t there that day.

FREE INDIRECT SPEECH:

Dr. Taylor entered the empty classroom. Why weren’this students heretoday?


Direct quoted speech

With a strong prejudice against everything he might say, she began his account of what had happened at Netherfield. She read with an eagerness which hardly left her power of comprehension, and from impatience of knowing what the next sentence might bring, was incapable of attending to the sense of the one before her eyes. His belief of her sister's insensibility she instantly resolved to be false; and his account of the real, the worst objections to the match, made her too angry to have any wish of doing him justice. He expressed no regret for what he had done which satisfied her; his style was not penitent, but haughty. It was all pride and insolence.

(p. 156)


Direct quoted speech

With a strong prejudice against everything he might say, she began his account of what had happened at Netherfield. She read with an eagerness which hardly left her power of comprehension, and from impatience of knowing what the next sentence might bring, was incapable of attending to the sense of the one before her eyes. ‘His belief of my sister's insensibility must be false’, she instantly resolved, ‘and his account of the real, the worst objections to the match, make me too angry to have any wish of doing him justice. He expresses no regret for what he has done which satisfies me; his style is not penitent, but haughty. It is all pride and insolence’ Elizabeth thought.

(p. 156)


Direct quoted speech

With a strong prejudice against everything he might say, she began his account of what had happened at Netherfield. She read with an eagerness which hardly left her power of comprehension, and from impatience of knowing what the next sentence might bring, was incapable of attending to the sense of the one before her eyes. ‘His belief of my sister's insensibility must be false’, she instantly resolved. His account of the real, the worst objections to the match, made her too angry to have any wish of doing him justice. ‘He expresses no regret for what he has done which satisfies me; his style is not penitent, but haughty. It is all pride and insolence’ Elizabeth thought.

(p. 156)


Direct quoted speech

D. W. Harding, ‘Regulated Hatred: An Aspect of the Work of Jane Austen’ (1940)

D. W. Harding, Regulated hatred and other essays on Jane Austen, ed. Monica Lawlor (Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Athlone Press, 1998)


Direct quoted speech

D. W. Harding, ‘Regulated Hatred’

Sought to counter the view of JA as: ‘a delicate satirist, revealing with inimitable lightness of touch the comic foibles and amiable weaknesses of the people whom she lived amongst and liked’.


Direct quoted speech

  • D. W. Harding, ‘Regulated Hatred’

  • Sought to counter the view of JA as: ‘a delicate satirist, revealing with inimitable lightness of touch the comic foibles and amiable weaknesses of the people whom she lived amongst and liked’.

  • JA’s writing characterized by:

  • The ‘eruption of fear and hatred into the relationships of everyday social life’.

  • Depictions of ‘people whom she herself detests and fears’.

  • They are meant them to be, read and enjoyed by precisely the sort of people whom she disliked.

  • Use of caricature (e.g. Mrs Bennet, Lady Catherine de Bourgh), but the blurring of distinctions between caricature and realistic portraiture..

  • This is key to her style. Such caricatures were a ‘criticism of real people in real society’.


Direct quoted speech

  • D. W. Harding, ‘Regulated Hatred’

  • Austen on the psychiatrist’s coach:

  • ‘To her the first necessity was to keep on reasonably good terms with the associates of everyday her life […] yet she was sensitive to the crudenesses and complacencies and knew that her real existence depended on resisting many of the values they implied. The novels gave her a way out of this dilemma.’

  • ‘As a novelist […] her aim was to find the means for unobtrusive spiritual survival, without open conflict with the friendly people around her […] Satire such as this is obviously not a means of admonition but of self-preservation.’


Direct quoted speech

Austen’s harshness:

Their table was superlatively stupid. Scarcely a syllable was uttered that did not relate to the game, except when Mrs. Jenkinson expressed her fears of Miss de Bourgh's being too hot or too cold, or having too much or too little light. A great deal more passed at the other table. Lady Catherine was generally speaking—stating the mistakes of the three others, or relating some anecdote of herself. Mr. Collins was employed in agreeing to everything her ladyship said, thanking her for every fish he won, and apologising if he thought he won too many. Sir William did not say much. He was storing his memory with anecdotes and noble names.

(p. 128)


Direct quoted speech

Austen’s harshness:

Of Mrs Bennet:

She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper.

(p. 3)


Direct quoted speech

Austen’s harshness:

Of Mrs Bennet:

She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper.

(p. 3)

Of Mary:

Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she reached.

(p. 3)


Direct quoted speech

Austen’s harshness:

Of Mr Collins:

Mr Collins was not a sensible man, and the deficiency of nature had been but little assisted by education or society.

(p. 52)

The stupidity with which he was favoured by nature, must guard his courtship from any charm that could make a woman wish for its continuance.

(p. 93)


Direct quoted speech

Austen’s harshness:

Of Ann de Bourgh:

Miss de Bourgh was pale and sickly; her features, though not plain, were insignificant.

(p. 125)


Direct quoted speech

Austen’s harshness:

Of Ann de Bourgh:

Miss de Bourgh was pale and sickly; her features, though not plain, were insignificant.

(p. 125)

Of Charlotte Lucas:

a friend disgracing herself and sunk in her esteem

(p. 97)


Direct quoted speech

Austen’s harshness:

Of Mr Bennet:

Elizabeth, however, had never been blind to the impropriety of her father’s behaviour as a husband […] that continual breach of conjugal obligation and decorum which, in exposing his wife to the contempt of her own children, was highly reprehensible.

(p. 181)


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