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FINAL CBA REVIEW GUIDE. FINAL ELA CBA: MAY 22, 2014 TEST WILL CONSIST OF 1 PERSONAL NARRATIVE ESSAY 16 MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS FOR REGULAR 29 MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS FOR PRE-AP. Personal narrative. Indent each new paragraph Write legibly Use the dictionary Include 5Ws

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FINAL CBA REVIEW GUIDE

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Final cba review guide

FINAL CBA REVIEW GUIDE

FINAL ELA CBA: MAY 22, 2014

TEST WILL CONSIST OF

1 PERSONAL NARRATIVE ESSAY

16 MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS FOR REGULAR

29 MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS FOR PRE-AP


Personal narrative

Personal narrative

  • Indent each new paragraph

  • Write legibly

  • Use the dictionary

  • Include 5Ws

  • Provide details and examples

  • Use #3 type sentences

  • Use SAT words

  • Include 1 Figurative Language sentence

  • Stay on-topic (no meandering)

  • Use MNM, PIC, STC, etc.


Literary terms

LITERARY TERMS

  • MOOD: how the reader feels when reading a story, poem, or drama (think of Me for Mood)

  • TONE: how the author felt when writing a story, poem, or drama (think of T in auThor)

  • PREPOSITIONS: In a sentence, they indicate: time, location, place, position, direction, manner

  • CONTRAST: a comparison made to distinguish differences between two characters, two main ideas, two settings, etc.

  • SYMBOLISM: a word that represents a bigger meaning in a reading selection

  • SIMILE: a comparison using “like” or “as”

  • METAPHOR: a comparison without using “like” or “as”

  • IMAGERY: words used to create a picture in the reader’s mind

  • IRONY: the use of words that mean the opposite of what you really think especially in order to be funny

  • PERSONIFICATION: words used to give nonhuman things human qualities

  • ALLITERATION: the repetition of sounds at the beginning of each word

  • ONOMATOPOEIA: words that represent the sound being created


Prepositions

PREPOSITIONS

  • In a sentence, they indicate:

    • time, location, place, position, direction, manner

      • ON: when it is a flat place/you are living on top of it

      • IN: if you can go inside of it (it has boundaries/walls)

      • AT: if it is a location that you can point to in a map


Simile

Simile

  • A comparison of two unlike things using like or as

    • Example: Marlene dances and spins like a top.


Metaphor

Metaphor

  • A comparison of two unlike things without using like or as

    • Example: Fabian is a beast on the football field.


Imagery

IMAGERY

  • Words used to create a picture in the reader’s mind

    • Example: The muddy old dog slowly scraped across the room.


Irony

IRONY

  • The use of words or situations that mean the opposite of what you really think especially in order to be funny

    • Example: He worried himself sick by worrying so much about his health.

    • Example: An escalator in a 2 story fitness club.


Hyperbole

Hyperbole

  • An exaggeration used to make a point

    • Example: Amanda can run for a thousand miles without getting tired.


Personification

Personification

  • Giving a non-human thing human qualities

    • Example: Summer was dead.


Alliteration

alliteration

  • The repetition of sounds at the beginning of each word

    • Example: the same high standards of strength and sacrifice

ONOMATOPOEIA

  • Words that represent the sound being created

    • Example: roar, tweet, meow, chirp


Types of sentences phrases

Types of sentences/phrases

  • Simple Sentence: a sentence containing a subject and predicate (who and what)

    • This is simple sentence.

  • Complex Sentence: a sentence containing a subject, predicate, and subordinating clause (who, what, WABU)

    • This is a complex sentence because it contains more information.

  • Compound Sentence: two simple sentences combined using a comma and a FANBOY

    • This is a compound sentence, and it contains two simple sentences.

  • Imperative Sentence: a sentence that demands something from the subject; it ends with a period

    • Read every day.

  • Exclamatory Sentence: a sentence that expresses strong emotion; it ends with an exclamation mark

    • You must read every day!

  • Declarative Sentence: a sentence that declares something; it ends with a period

    • I like reading.


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