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The Future of Wi-Fi. Dirk Gates Chief Executive Officer. Lessons in Networking. Wi-Fi Evolution. Wireless Market Drivers 75M Wi-Fi clients in 2006 70M hybrid phones by 2007 More business applications $2B Market in 2006. Connection Growth. Connection Growth. 100Base-T. 100Base-T.

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the future of wi fi

The Future of Wi-Fi

Dirk GatesChief Executive Officer

lessons in networking
Lessons in Networking

Wi-Fi Evolution

  • Wireless Market Drivers
    • 75M Wi-Fi clients in 2006
    • 70M hybrid phones by 2007
    • More business applications
    • $2B Market in 2006

Connection Growth

Connection Growth

100Base-T

100Base-T

802.11i

L2 Switching

L2 Switching

802.11b/a

10Base-T

10Base-T

802.11g

802.11

WLAN Array

2000

2000

2005

2010

1990

1990

1995

1995

Connectivity

Connectivity

Capacity

Capacity

  • Ethernet Evolution
  • Wi-Fi Hits Critical Inflection Point
    • Current WLAN architectures won’t support surge in demand
    • Need simple architecture to support coverage AND capacity
wi fi deployment evolution
Wi-Fi Deployment Evolution

54

1,404

162

Mbps

11

33

3 26

Non-overlapping Channels

802.11b 802.11g 802.11a

  • Deployment Recommendation
    • Deploy a multi-mode (802.11a/b/g) infrastructure
  • Increased Capacity
    • 802.11a adds 23 more channels
    • 1,242Mbps of additional capacity
  • Increased Performance
    • 802.11g better than 802.11b (but degrades in its presence)
    • 802.11a adds clean spectrum (less interference)
      • Higher overall performance
      • Range now matches 802.11g
  • Now Industry Standard
    • All leading chipset vendors are shipping multimode as standard offering*
    • By next year, nearly all enterprise class notebooks will be 802.11a/b/g capable*
    • Proposed 802.11n standard will virtually eliminate 802.11b/g
      • Channel bonding scheme in 802.11n leaves only one bonded channel in 2.4GHz

* Source: Del Oro 2004

wi fi evolution
Wi-Fi Evolution

New Client Sales

90

80

70

60

50

Millions

40

30

20

10

0

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

10.17

8.39

7.40

7.04

7.22

6.52

3.04

.11b

29.43

34.33

25.47

11.91

7.46

4.89

3.81

.11b/g

16.89

33.57

52.50

66.90

71.94

68.90

63.78

.11a/b/g

.11a/b/g/n

0.00

0.00

5.93

17.69

33.65

55.52

81.48

56.49

76.30

91.30

103.53

120.26

135.83

152.11

Total

% w/ 802.11a

30%

44%

58%

65%

60%

51%

42%

New Client Shipments

  • Migration to Multi-mode
    • 2.4GHz does not support future WLAN needs
    • 802.11a client shipments surpass 802.11b/g only clients this year
    • Chipset suppliers have announced a/b/g solutions for mobile phones (designs currently in development)
  • Other Data Points
    • Chip makers driving a/b/g adoption
      • Less interference
      • Huge push beginning 2005
    • 50M+ a/b/g chips forecast in 2006
    • Price delta b/g vs. a/b/g < $6
deploy for voice and data
Deploy for Voice and Data
  • Design for Capacity – Not Just Coverage
    • Over provision for wireless (same as for wired)
    • Use all available 802.11a/b/g channels simultaneously
    • Reuse channels as often as possible
    • Deploy for 54Mbps everywhere
    • Keep cell sizes small
    • Minimize simultaneous users per cell
  • Optimize for Voice
    • Fewer users at higher data rates = less contention/latency
    • Small cells & higher rates = lower Tx power & faster Tx time = longer battery life
    • Insist on standards-based QoS (802.11e / WMM)
    • Use VLANs and SSIDs to map wired VoIP to VoWLAN
    • Minimize roaming domains through WLAN switching
  • Build a Wi-Fi Network to do more than ONE THING!
current architecture suitability for voice and data
Current Architecture Suitability for Voice and Data
  • Traditional “Fat” Access Point Deployments
    • Too many devices
    • Expensive to deploy
    • Hard to manage
    • Poor roaming capabilities
  • “Thin” Access Points + “WLAN Switch” Infrastructure
    • Even more devices and equipment
    • Still hard to deploy
    • More Expensive
    • Easier to manage
    • Does not scale
    • Better roaming
current architectures
Current Architectures

Current Architecture Suitability for Voice and Data

  • Proprietary TDMA-based Products
    • Multiple Access Points - Single Channel and BSSID
    • Creates a single, large collision domain
    • Transparent roaming at the expense of capacity
    • Lowest capacity architecture for data
    • Does not work well with standard APs
  • Integrated High Count Radio Solutions
    • Switch + Multiple Integrated Access Points
    • Operates on all available channels
    • Fewer devices to deploy and manage
    • Sectorized coverage best for channel reuse
    • Stations roam less
    • Ideal for voice – lowest latency
    • Best architecture for both voice and data
    • Best TCO
summary
Summary
  • Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
  • Coverage is so 90’s – it’s all about capacity.
  • Get thee to 5GHz.
  • Voice is coming – be prepared.
  • Don’t ride a one trick pony.
thank you

Thank You

Dirk Gates

Chief Executive Officer

[email protected]

www.xirrus.com

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