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Rhetorical Devices. Joe Wagner Ms. Dowd Public Speaking/ F Channel November 2012. Eponym [ep-uh-nim]. A person, place, or thing that something is named after (Part of Etymology) 1846, from Greek. eponymos "given as a name, giving one\'s name to something". Eponym: Examples.

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rhetorical devices

Rhetorical Devices

Joe Wagner

Ms. Dowd

Public Speaking/ F Channel

November 2012

eponym ep uh nim
Eponym [ep-uh-nim]
  • A person, place, or thing that something is named after (Part of Etymology)
  • 1846, from Greek. eponymos "given as a name, giving one\'s name to something"
eponym examples
Eponym: Examples
  • Saxophone: named after Sax, the surname of a 19th-century instrument-making family in Belgium
  • Sandwich: named after John Montagu, the Fourth Earl of Sandwich (1718–1792), a British politician
  • Salisbury steak: American physician James Salisbury invented this entre as part of his highly questionable all-meat diet
exemplum ig zem pluhm
Exemplum[ig-zem-pluhm]
  • An example or model; a model for behavior
  • (mid-13c.), from Latin. Exemplum "a sample"
exemplum examples
Exemplum: Examples
  • The Monk’s Prologue and Tale
  • The Pardoner’s Tale
  • The Wife of Bath’s Prologue

*These are all too long to provide the entire exemplum.

imagery im ij ree im i juh ree
Imagery [im-ij-ree, im-i-juh-ree]
  • Figurative description or illustration
  • (mid-14c.), from French. Imagerie, “painter”
imagery examples
Imagery: Examples
  • He fumed and charged like an angry bull.
  • The eerie silence was shattered by her scream.
  • The F-16 swooped down like an eagle after its prey.
hyperbaton hahy pur buh ton
Hyperbaton [hahy-pur-buh-ton]
  • The use of uncommon word order to emphasize a point or idea
  • 1570s, from Greek. hyperbaton, "overstepping"
hyperbaton examples
Hyperbaton: Examples
  • "Object there was none. Passion there was none. I loved the old man.“ ("The Tell-Tale Heart")
  • “Sorry I be but go you must." (Yoda in Star Wars)
  • "One swallow does not a summer make, nor one fine day.“ (Aristotle)
hyperbole hahy pur buh lee
Hyperbole [hahy-pur-buh-lee]
  • Intentional exaggeration
  • early 15c., from Greek. hyperbole "exaggeration, extravagance"
hyperbole examples
Hyperbole: Examples
  • I’m so hungry I could eat a horse.
  • Your eyes are bigger than your stomach.
  • You’ve said that a million times.
  • That joke’s so old that, the last time I heard it, I was riding my dinosaur.
images
Images
  • http://tobiasmastgrave.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/imagery-in-poetry-predator/
  • http://goodvibeblog.com/law-of-attraction-morals/
  • http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/10/06/article-1318093-0B803914000005DC-954_306x423.jpg
  • http://www.glarkware.com/adult/hyperbole
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