defying reality using virtual worlds to break physical reality in productive ways
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Defying Reality Using Virtual Worlds to Break Physical Reality in Productive Ways

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 47

Defying Reality Using Virtual Worlds to Break Physical Reality in Productive Ways - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 242 Views
  • Uploaded on

Defying Reality Using Virtual Worlds to Break Physical Reality in Productive Ways. Instead of just replicating physical reality, we should identify and leverage unique levers available to us in virtual worlds to create new forms of work and social interactions.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Defying Reality Using Virtual Worlds to Break Physical Reality in Productive Ways' - delta


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

Instead of just replicating physical reality, we should identify and leverageunique leversavailable to us in virtual worlds to create new forms of work and social interactions.

slide4

Being in Nothingness (John Perry Barlow)

Suddenly I don’t have a body anymore … the closest analog to Virtual Reality in my experience is psychedelic … the third oldest human urge, the desire to have visions.

slide8

Philip Rosedale (Founder of Second Life)

Based on Second Life, the average of all dreams is Malibu.

slide10

The Issue of Virtual Chairs

Why do we need virtual chairs if our virtual bodies never get tired?

slide11

3D isn’t a magic ingredient

Boring people are still boring when they are 3D

slide14

The Central Dogma of Games

Games are made to slow you down. The inefficiency IS the game.

slide21

Personality Gold Mines

Rich, longitudinal, behavioral profiles based on engaging activities.

slide22

Rich Inference Markers

Is it possible to infer someone’s real world gender, age, and personality based on virtual behavioral markers alone?

inference rules
Inference Rules

Male

Age: 18-25

slide24

Dynamic Mimicry

Infers and leverages your gender, age, and personality to create high-influence agents in the virtual world

slide25

Tailored Realities

Everyone sees their own version of reality.

These versions need not be congruent.

slide29

Attractiveness is correlated with:

  • Friendliness
  • Extraversion

Can we make someone friendlier by giving them a more attractive avatar?

attractiveness findings
Attractiveness - Findings
  • Participants in more attractive avatars:
  • Walked closer to the virtual stranger
  • Shared more personal information with the virtual stranger
slide31

Height is correlated with:

  • Confidence
  • Personal Income
  • Leadership

Can we make someone more confident by giving them a taller avatar?

findings height
Findings - Height
  • People in tall avatars more likely to make unfair splits.
  • Also, people in short avatars twice as likely to accept unfair splits.
aging your avatar

Age-morphed

Digital Avatar

Actual photo

Digital Avatar

Aging Your Avatar
retirement fund
Retirement Fund

Hypothetical Retirement Fund Growth by Condition

$2,000

Old

$1,000

Young

$0

2008

2018

2028

2038

2048

Year

avatar creation
Avatar Creation

PhotographFeature Tracing RenderingAvatar

exercising
Exercising

Watching your virtual self run

Self Running

Other Running

Self Loiter

findings
Findings

Participants who saw themselves exercise demonstrated higher levels of exercise in the next 24 hours.

Self Running

slide42

Helping Each Other

There weren’t places on line you could go to get all the answers. You had to ask other players. There was a lot more give and take. [M, 29]

slide46

Social Architectures

We’re used to thinking of altruism as an individual trait, but virtual worlds show that altruism can be part of the social architecture of games.

ad