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Calculating the Secrets of Life: Mathematics in Biology and Medicine. De Witt Sumners Department of Mathematics Florida State University Tallahassee, FL 32306 [email protected] What is mathematics good for?.

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calculating the secrets of life mathematics in biology and medicine

Calculating the Secrets of Life: Mathematics in Biology and Medicine

De Witt Sumners

Department of Mathematics

Florida State University

Tallahassee, FL 32306

[email protected]

what is mathematics good for
What is mathematics good for?

“No longer just the study of number and space, mathematical science has become the science of patterns, with theory built on relations among patterns and on applications derived from the fit between pattern and observation.”

L.A. Steen, SCIENCE (1988)

mathematics in florida
Mathematics in Florida
  • Farside--Larsen
mathematics the foundation for scientific discovery

Mathematics: The Foundation for Scientific Discovery

X Ray Crystallography: Group theory

CAT & MRI: Radon Transform

Weather Prediction: Navier-Stokes

mathematics in biology and medicine

Mathematics in Biology and Medicine

DNA Enzymes: Chemotherapy

Heart: Fibrillation

Brain: Function and Malfunction

early use of mathematics
EARLY USE OF MATHEMATICS

Galen (200 AD):blood created in the liver by eating food, ebbs and flows, goes from one side of heart to other via invisible pores in the heart wall, arteries and veins sealed and separate from each other

William Harvey (1615) mathematically proves that blood circulates: by studying cadavers, heart pumps 27 lt/hr, average human has 5.5 liters of blood

slide8

Strand Passage

Topoisomerase

slide9

Strand Exchange

Recombinase

topological enzymology

Topological Enzymology

Mathematics: Deduce enzyme binding and mechanism from observed products

slide14

Toposides--Chemotherapy

Topoisomerase

Replication Fork

mathematics in the cell

Mathematics in the Cell

Mathematics--the ultimate microscope

Compute protein structure and function

Understand viruses

Design chemotherapy drugs

slide16

Normal Heartbeat

Jim Keeener, U. Utah

slide17

Spiral Waves-Tachycardia

Jim Keener, U. Utah

slide18

Onset of Fibrillation

J. Keener, U. Utah

mathematics in the heart

Mathematics in the Heart

Arrythmias-chaos theory

Signal conduction geometry--fractals

Fiber structure--finite element methods

Conduction waves--differential equations & topology

Visualization--computer graphics

mathematics in the brain

Mathematics in the Brain

Normal brain in silico--computational template for function and anatomy

Clinical diagnosis and treatment--compare subject brain to template brain

mathematics in biology and medicine1

Mathematics in Biology and Medicine

Mathematics--the ultimate microscope

Biological systems in silico--experiments possible

Organ templates--computational diagnosis and treatment

where can math help out
Too big--biosphere

Too slow--macro evolution

Too remote in time--early extinctions

Too complex--brain, stock market

Too small--molecular structure

Too fast--photosynthesis

Too remote in space--life at the extremes

Too dangerous or unethical--epidemiology of infectious agents, war weapons and strategies

Where can math help out?

Joel Cohen, Rockefeller University

thank you

Thank You

National Science Foundation

National Institutes of Health

Burroughs Wellcome Fund

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