School wide positive behavioral interventions supports pbis l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 107

School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 214 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS). February 25, 2010 Andrea Alexander [email protected] PBIS Framework is Based on Science. Behavioral Science: Reinforcement of positive behavior is a key component of Tier 1.

Download Presentation

School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS)

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


School wide positive behavioral interventions supports pbis l.jpg

School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports(PBIS)

February 25, 2010

Andrea Alexander

[email protected]


Pbis framework is based on science l.jpg

PBIS Framework is Based on Science

Behavioral Science: Reinforcement of positive behavior is a key component of Tier 1.

Social Science: Significance of student relationship with a key adult.

Physical Science: Public Health Prevention Model


Maryland s tiered instructional positive behavioral interventions and supports framework l.jpg

Maryland’s Tiered Instructional & Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Framework

Academic Systems

Behavioral Systems

  • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions

  • Address needs of individual student

  • Function-based assessments

  • Specialized & individualized

  • strategies for students with intensive needs

  • Intense, durable strategies

  • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions

  • Address individual needs of student

  • Assessment-based

  • High Intensity

  • Targeted, Group Interventions

  • Small, needs-based groups

  • High efficiency

  • Rapid response

  • Function-based logic

  • Supplementary strategies

  • for at-risk students who do not respond to primary

  • Targeted, Group Interventions

  • Small, needs-based groups

  • High efficiency

  • Rapid response

  • Core Curriculum and

  • Differentiated Instruction

  • All students

  • Preventive, proactive

  • Core Curriculum and

  • Universal Interventions

  • All settings, all students

  • Preventive, proactive

  • School-wide or class-wide systems for all students and staff

1-5%

1-5%

5-10%

5-10%

80-90%

80-90%


Pbis maryland infrastructure l.jpg

PBIS Maryland Infrastructure

Commitment of leadership at State, District and School levels

Private, Public, University partnership

Implementation Standards and Protocols developed and implemented

INFRASTRUCTURE developed to support State and Regional Training Capacity

State-wide impact:

741 schools in all 24 systems trained

660 implementing Tier 1/Universal PBIS with fidelity. Over 100 in initial Tier 2 cohort.

PBIS Maryland WEBSITE and DATABASE (www.pbismaryland.org)


Pbis maryland infrastructure6 l.jpg

PBIS Maryland Infrastructure

  • Ongoing Technical Assistance from National TA Center on PBIS

  • Ongoing Evaluation/Progress Monitoring

  • Evaluation Tools

  • Ongoing Data Collection for Decision Making

    • IPI (Implementation Phases Inventory), SETs, SWIS, BOQ

  • Ongoing expansion of Local School System infrastructure as numbers of schools increase—staff designation, coaches for schools, and funding

  • Federal Grants to support Rigorous Randomized Evaluation Activity through JHU


Maryland s pbis mandates l.jpg

Maryland’s PBIS Mandates


What is the difference between a regulation and a statute l.jpg

What is the difference between a regulation and a statute?

The Legislature enacts statutes: Annotated Code of Maryland

Administrative agencies adopt, amend and repeal regulations under the authority granted to them by statutes.  Unless the Legislature has created an exemption, agencies must follow the procedures in the Administrative Procedure Act when adopting, amending or repealing regulations: Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR)


How to find pbis statute annotated code of maryland education article 7 304 1 l.jpg

How to find PBIS Statute: Annotated Code Of Maryland, Education Article §7-304.1

Go to http://www.michie.com

Scroll down to Maryland and Click on Michie’s Code of Maryland

Click on Education (Left Side of Screen)

Click on Section 7: Public Schools

Click on Subtitle 304


How to find pbis regulations code of maryland regulations comar 13a 08 06 00 l.jpg

How to find PBIS Regulations: Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) 13A.08.06.00

Go to: http://www.dsd.state.md.us/comar/

Search by Title Number: 13A State Board of Education

Click on Subtitle 08: Students

Click on Chapter 06: Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports to find Title page .00, Definition .01, Administrative Procedures .02 and Administrative History .999


Positive behavioral interventions and support program defined in 7 304 1 l.jpg

"Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support Program" defined in 7-304.1.


Implementation requirement 1 l.jpg

Implementation Requirement #1

Each county board shall require implementation of a

positive behavioral interventions and support program;

or (ii) An alternative behavior modification program in

collaboration with the Department in an elementary

school with a suspension rate that exceeds:

(i) 18 percent of its enrollment for the 2005-2006 school year;   

(ii) 16 percent of its enrollment for the 2006-2007 school year;   

(iii) 14 percent of its enrollment for the 2007-2008 school year;   

(iv) 12 percent of its enrollment for the 2008-2009 school year; and   

(v) 10 percent of its enrollment for the 2009-2010 school year and each school year thereafter. 


Implementation requirement 2 l.jpg

Implementation Requirement #2

An elementary school that has already implemented a positive behavioral interventions and support program or a behavior modification program shall expand its existing program if it has a suspension rate that exceeds the standard specified in paragraph (2) of this subsection. 


Implementation requirement 3 l.jpg

Implementation Requirement #3

Each county board shall require implementation of a

positive behavioral interventions and support program;

or (ii) An alternative behavior modification program in

collaboration with the Department, in any school with

a truancy rate that exceeds:

• 8% of its enrollment for the 2008-2009 school year;   

• 6% of its enrollment for the 2009-2010 school year;   

• 4% of its enrollment for the 2010-2011 school year;   

• 2% of its enrollment for the 2011-2012 school year; and,   

• 1% of its enrollment for the 2012-2013 school year and each school year thereafter. 


Implementation requirement 4 l.jpg

Implementation Requirement #4

A school that has already

implemented a positive behavioral

interventions and support program

or a behavior modification program

shall expand its programif it has a

truancy rate that exceeds the

standards listed above. 


Schools identified in school year 2008 2009 l.jpg

Schools Identified in School Year 2008/2009

Elementary schools with suspension rates exceeding 12%;

Elementary schools already implementing PBIS with suspension rates exceeding 12%; and,

Any school with a truancy rate exceeding 8%;

Any school already implementing PBIS with a truancy rate exceeding 8%.


Defining truancy student records manual l.jpg

Defining Truancy-- Student Records Manual

The Department is drafting regulations that suggest

the use of “habitual truancy” to define the data to be

tracked when implementing the law. In the Student

Records Manual, a student is considered a habitual

truant if he or she meets ALL of the following

criteria:

• the student was age 5 through 20 during the school year;

• the student was in membership in a school for 91 or more days; and

• the student was unlawfully absent for 20% or more of the days in membership.


School wide positive behavioral interventions supports overview presented by milt mckenna l.jpg

School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports: OverviewPresented by: Milt McKenna

Horner & Sugai

OSEP Center on PBIS

Universities of Oregon & Connecticut


My job today l.jpg

My job today…

To describe features of a systems approach to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports…..moving beyond classroom & behavior management.


Coordination collaboration l.jpg

Coordination/ Collaboration

1999 - 2009


Slide28 l.jpg

So,….what is PBIS?

PBIS is a systems approach for

establishing the social culture

and behavioral supports needed

for a school to be

an effective learning environment

for all students.

Not a specific practice or

curriculum…it’s a

general approach

to preventing

problem behavior

Not new…it’s based on

long history of

behavioral practices &

effective instructional

design & strategies

Not limited to any

particular group of

students…it’s

for all students


What does pbis look like in a school l.jpg

What does PBIS look like in a school?

  • >80% of students can tell you what is expected of them & can give behavioral examples because they have been taught, actively supervised, practiced, & acknowledged.

  • Positive adult-to-student interactions exceed negative.

  • Data & team-based action planning & implementation are operating.

  • Function based behavior support is foundation for addressing problem behavior.

  • Administrators are active participants.

  • Full continuum of behavior support is available to all students.


Slide30 l.jpg

Challenge #1


Slide31 l.jpg

Challenge # 2


The prognosis l.jpg

The Prognosis

  • Students with academic failure and problem behaviors likely will drop out of school and:

    • be involved with the corrections system

    • be single parents

    • be involved with the social services system

    • be unemployed

    • be involved in automobile accidents

    • use illicit drugs

Centers for Disease Control, 1993Duncan, Forness, & Hartsough, 1995Carson, Sittlington, & Frank, 1995Wagner, D’Amico, Marder, Newman, Blackorby, 1992Jay & Padilla, 1987Bullis & Gaylord-Ross, 1991


Slide33 l.jpg

Challenge # 3


Slide34 l.jpg

Best Behavior (Sprague & Golly, 2004)


Competing inter related national goals l.jpg

Challenge # 5

Competing, Inter-related National Goals

  • Improve literacy, math, geography, science, etc.

  • Make schools safe, caring, & focused on teaching & learning

  • Improve student character & citizenship

  • Eliminate bullying

  • Prevent drug use

  • Prepare for postsecondary education

  • Provide a free & appropriate education for all

  • Prepare viable workforce

  • Affect rates of high risk, antisocial behavior

  • Leave no child behind

  • Etc….


Slide36 l.jpg

Challenge # 6

The key is not to prioritize what's on your schedule, but to schedule your priorities.” Steven Covey


Challenges cont l.jpg

Not enough time

Too much talk…not enough action

Unclear outcomes

Too few priorities

Too many priorities

Too many opinions

Multiple competing experts

No experts

Too many diverse perspectives

Too much redundancy

Done it before

Never done it before

Lack of clear outcomes

Slow to get started

Unstructured

Unresolved conflicts

………

Challenges (cont.)


A main message l.jpg

A Main Message

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Good Teaching

Behavior Management

Increasing District & State Competency and Capacity

Investing in Outcomes, Data, Practices, and Systems


Worry 1 teaching by getting tough l.jpg

“Worry #1“TEACHING” by Getting Tough

If Russell doesn’t

respond, we get

TOUGHER

Russell: “I hate this f____ing school, & you’re a dumbf_____.”

If Russell STILL

doesn’t improve, we

get REAL TOUGH

& enforce

BOTTOM LINE!

Teacher: “That is disrespectful language. I’m sending you to the office so you’ll learn never to say those words again….starting now!”


Erroneous assumption that student l.jpg

Erroneous assumption that student…

  • Is inherently “bad”

  • Will learn more appropriate behavior through increased use of “aversives”

  • Will be better tomorrow…….


Science of behavior has taught us that children l.jpg

Science of behavior has taught us that children….

ALL BEHAVIORS SERVE SOME FUNCTION

  • Are NOT born with “bad behaviors”

  • Do NOTlearn when presented contingent aversive consequences

    ……..Do learn better ways of behaving by being taught directly & receiving positive feedback…. consider function


Assumptions l.jpg

ASSUMPTIONS

  • BEHAVIOR is learned

  • BEHAVIOR is teachable

  • BEHAVIOR occurrence is affected by the environment

  • BEHAVIOR is changeable

  • BEHAVIOR is more likely if effective, efficient, relevant and durable


Non examples of function based approach l.jpg

Non-examples of Function-Based approach

“Function” = outcome, result, purpose, consequence

  • “Russell, you skipped 2 school days, so we’re going to suspend you for 2 more.”

  • “Jason, I’m taking your book away because you obviously aren’t ready to learn.”

  • “You want my attention?! I’ll show you attention,…let’s take a walk down to the office & have a little chat with the Principal.”


Worry 2 train hope l.jpg

Worry #2:“Train & Hope”


Slide45 l.jpg

Enhanced PBIS Implementation Logic


Big ideas l.jpg

BIG IDEAS

  • 3-5 years

  • Organizational Framework

  • Critical Features same across schools

    • unique to the culture of the school

  • System investment in Coaching Capacity


Slide47 l.jpg

Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

PBIS

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff Behavior

DATA

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behavior


Slide48 l.jpg

Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

CONTINUUM OF

SCHOOL-WIDE

INSTRUCTIONAL &

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

SUPPORT

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

~15%

APPLYING TRIANGLE LOGIC TO ADULT BEHAVIOR

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students


80 rule l.jpg

“80% Rule”

  • Apply triangle to adult behavior!

  • Regularly acknowledge staff behavior

  • Individualized intervention for non-responders - (administrative responsibility)


Critical features l.jpg

Critical Features

  • Establish Commitment

  • Establish and Maintain Team

  • Self-Assessment

  • Establish School-Wide Expectations

  • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

  • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

  • Establish Information System

  • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

  • Build District Level Support


Critical features51 l.jpg

Critical Features

  • Establish Commitment

  • Establish and Maintain Team

  • Self-Assessment

  • Establish School-Wide Expectations

  • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

  • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

  • Establish Information System

  • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

  • Build District Level Support


Establish commitment l.jpg

Establish Commitment

  • Administrator support and active involvement

  • Behavior Support is 1of top 3 school improvement goals

  • 80% Faculty support

  • 3 year timeline


Critical features53 l.jpg

Critical Features

  • Establish Commitment

  • Establish and Maintain Team

  • Self-Assessment

  • Establish School-Wide Expectations

  • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

  • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

  • Establish Information System

  • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

  • Build District Level Support


Team composition l.jpg

Team Composition

  • Administrator

  • Grade/Department Representation

  • Specialized Support

    • Special Educator, Counselor, School Psychologist, Social Worker, etc.

  • Support Staff

    • Office, Supervisory, Custodial, Bus, Security, etc.

  • Parent

  • Community

    • Mental Health, Business

  • Student

Start with

Team that

“Works.”


Critical features55 l.jpg

Critical Features

  • Establish Commitment

  • Establish and Maintain Team

  • Self-Assessment

  • Establish School-Wide Expectations

  • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

  • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

  • Establish Information System

  • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

  • Build District Level Support


Self assessment l.jpg

Self-Assessment

  • Completion of PBIS Staff Survey

  • Team summarizes existing school discipline data.

  • Strengths, areas of immediate focus identified (prioritize)

  • Action plan written


Gather information l.jpg

Gather Information

  • AVAILABLE DATA:

    • Office Referrals,

    • Suspensions,

    • Attendance,

    • Academics

  • SURVEY:

  • Staff, Students, Administration, Parents


  • Slide59 l.jpg

    Marketing Strategy

    • Integrate past school behavior plans

    • Assure clarity of target areas

    • Incorporate school colors or mascot

    Respectful

    Able

    Motivated

    Safe


    80 staff buy in l.jpg

    80% Staff Buy In

    • Share/ Present Data

    • Start Small

    • Easy Implementation

    • Showcase Success


    Slide62 l.jpg

    Nuts andBolts

    • Brainstorm classroom vs. office managed behaviors

    • Come to consensus on language to be used

    • Agree on behaviors to list


    Slide63 l.jpg

    SWPBS

    Subsystems

    School-wide

    Classroom

    Family

    Non-classroom

    Student


    Critical features64 l.jpg

    Critical Features

    • Establish Commitment

    • Establish and Maintain Team

    • Self-Assessment

    • Establish School-Wide Expectations

    • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

    • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

    • Establish Information System

    • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

    • Build District Level Support


    Slide65 l.jpg

    School Rules

    NO Food

    NO Weapons

    NO Backpacks

    NO Drugs/Smoking

    NO Bullying

    Redesign Learning & Teaching Environment


    Establish sw expectations 3 5 l.jpg

    Establish SW Expectations3 - 5

    • Be Responsible

    • Be Respectful

    • Be Ready


    Slide68 l.jpg

    Few positive SW expectations defined, taught, & encouraged


    Teaching sw expectations frms opening day l.jpg

    Teaching SW ExpectationsFRMS “Opening Day”

    • Teach directly in context (“teaching stations”)

      • See/model

      • Practice

      • Acknowledge

    • 2 day intensive by all staff/students

    • Regular weekly/monthly review


    Slide70 l.jpg

    Expectations & behavioral skills are taught & recognized in natural context


    The power of teaching l.jpg

    The Power Of Teaching

    • “If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.”

    • “If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.”

    • “If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.”

    • “If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.”

    • “If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we … … teach? …punish?”

    Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?

    PBIS Philosophy


    Teaching matrix activity l.jpg

    Teaching Matrix Activity

    Classroom

    Lunchroom

    Bus

    Hallway

    Assembly

    Respect Others

    Use inside voice

    Eat your own food

    Stay in your seat

    Stay to right

    Arrive on time to speaker

    Respect Environment & Property

    Recycle paper

    Return trays

    Keep feet on floor

    Put trash in cans

    Take litter with you

    Respect Yourself

    Do your best

    Wash your hands

    Be at stop on time

    Use your words

    Listen to speaker

    Respect Learning

    Have materials ready

    Eat balanced diet

    Go directly from bus to class

    Go directly to class

    Discuss topic in class w/ others


    Pbis matrix for home l.jpg

    .

    PBIS Matrix for Home

    • I am respectfulListen to my parents

    • Be truthful to my parents

    • Play cooperatively

    • Speak nicely to others

    • I am responsiblePut away my toys, bike, and equipment

    • Help with jobs at home

    • Follow my parents’ directions

    • Share Thursday folder with parents

    • I am safePlay safely with others

    • Stay in designated areas

    • Stay away from strangers

    • Wear bike helmet and equipment

    • I am preparedFinish homework and share with parent

    • Pack backpack at night for school the next day

    • Go to bed on time

    • Get up and get ready for school when called


    Critical features74 l.jpg

    Critical Features

    • Establish Commitment

    • Establish and Maintain Team

    • Self-Assessment

    • Establish School-Wide Expectations

    • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

    • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

    • Establish Information System

    • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

    • Build District Level Support


    Acknowledging sw expectations rationale l.jpg

    Acknowledging SW Expectations: “RATIONALE”

    • Humans require regular & frequent feedback on their actions

    • Humans experience frequent feedback from others, self, & environment

    • W/o FORMAL feedback to encourage desired behavior, other forms of feedback shape undesired behaviors


    Slide76 l.jpg

    Acknowledge & Recognize


    Clever variations l.jpg

    Clever Variations

    Bus Bucks

    Super Sub Slips

    Golden Plunger

    G.O.O.S.E.

    First-in-Line

    Patriot’s Parking Pass

    Business Partner Discount

    What really matters

    Is the positive social

    acknowledgement

    & interaction!!


    Discipline works when l.jpg

    Punishment

    Reinforcement(success)

    Discipline Works When ….

    Prevention creates more Positive than Negative consequences

    4 : 1


    Monitoring dismissal l.jpg

    McCormick Elementary School, MD

    Monitoring Dismissal


    Positive office referral l.jpg

    “Positive Office Referral”

    • Balancing positive/negative adult/student contacts in Oregon

    • Procedures

      • Develop equivalent positive referral

      • Process like negative referral


    Slide82 l.jpg

    Tertiary Prevention:

    Specialized

    Individualized

    Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

    CONTINUUM OF

    SCHOOL-WIDE

    INSTRUCTIONAL &

    POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

    SUPPORT

    ~5%

    Secondary Prevention:

    Specialized Group

    Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

    ~15%

    APPLYING TRIANGLE LOGIC TO ADULT BEHAVIOR

    Primary Prevention:

    School-/Classroom-

    Wide Systems for

    All Students,

    Staff, & Settings

    ~80% of Students


    Slide83 l.jpg

    • “DINGER”

    • Reminding staff to have positive interaction

    • Procedures

      • Ring timer on regular, intermittent schedule

      • Engage in quick positive interaction

    “GOLDEN PLUNGER”

    • Involve custodian

    • Procedure

      • Custodian selects one classroom/ hallway each week that is clean & orderly

      • Sticks gold-painted plunger with banner on wall

    “1 FREE PERIOD”

    • Contributing to a safe, caring, effective school environment

    • Procedures

      • Given by Principal

      • Principal takes over class for one hour

      • Used at any time

    “G.O.O.S.E.”

    • “Get Out Of School Early”

      • Or “arrive late”

    • Procedures

      • Kids/staff nominate

      • Kids/staff reward, then pick


    Regularly acknowledge staff behavior l.jpg

    REGULARLY ACKNOWLEDGE STAFF BEHAVIOR


    Critical features86 l.jpg

    Critical Features

    • Establish Commitment

    • Establish and Maintain Team

    • Self-Assessment

    • Establish School-Wide Expectations

    • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

    • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

    • Establish Information System

    • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

    • Build District Level Support


    Office discipline referrals odr l.jpg

    Office Discipline Referrals (ODR)

    • Definition

      • Kid-Teacher-Administrator interaction

      • Underestimation of actual behavior

    • Improving usefulness & value

      • Clear, mutually exclusive, exhaustive definitions

      • Distinction between office v. classroom managed

      • Continuum of behavior support

      • Positive school-wide foundations

      • W/in school comparisons


    Critical features88 l.jpg

    Critical Features

    • Establish Commitment

    • Establish and Maintain Team

    • Self-Assessment

    • Establish School-Wide Expectations

    • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

    • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

    • Establish Information System

    • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

    • Build District Level Support


    General implementation process getting started l.jpg

    GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”

    Team

    Agreements

    Data-based

    Action Plan

    Evaluation

    Implementation


    Referrals per student l.jpg

    Referrals per Student


    Slide96 l.jpg

    10%

    N = 1679 443 163 246

    Elementary Middle High K (8-12)


    Slide97 l.jpg

    N = 1679 443 163 246

    Elementary Middle High K (8-12)


    Do we need to tweak our action plan l.jpg

    How often?

    Who?

    What?

    Where?

    When?

    How much?

    If problem,

    Which students/staff?

    What system?

    What intervention?

    What outcome?

    Do we need to tweak our action plan?

    + If many students are making same mistake, consider changing system….not students

    + START by teaching, monitoring & rewarding…before increasing punishment


    Odr administrator benefit springfield ms md l.jpg

    ODR Administrator BenefitSpringfield MS, MD

    2001-2002 2277

    2002-2003 - 1322

    = 955 42% improvement

    = 14,325 min. @15 min.

    = 238.75 hrs

    = 40 daysof Administrator time


    Odr instructional benefit springfield ms md l.jpg

    ODR Instructional BenefitSpringfield MS, MD

    2001-2002 2277

    2002-2003 - 1322

    = 955 42% improvement

    = 42,975 min. @ 45 min.

    = 716.25 hrs

    = 119 daysof Instructional time


    Critical features101 l.jpg

    Critical Features

    • Establish Commitment

    • Establish and Maintain Team

    • Self-Assessment

    • Establish School-Wide Expectations

    • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

    • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

    • Establish Information System

    • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

    • Build District Level Support


    Critical features102 l.jpg

    Critical Features

    • Establish Commitment

    • Establish and Maintain Team

    • Self-Assessment

    • Establish School-Wide Expectations

    • Establish On-Going System of Rewards

    • Establish System for Responding to Behavioral Violations

    • Establish Information System

    • Build Capacity for Function-Based Support

    • Build District Level Support


    Slide103 l.jpg

    PBIS Systems Implementation Logic

    Visibility

    Political Support

    Funding

    Leadership Team

    Active Coordination

    Evaluation

    Training

    Coaching

    Local School Teams/Demonstrations


    Pbis messages l.jpg

    PBIS Messages

    • Measurable & justifiable outcomes

    • On-going data-based decision making

    • Evidence-based practices

    • Systems ensuring durable, high fidelity of implementation


    Summary l.jpg

    Summary

    Investing in SW-PBS results in:

    • Change in school discipline systems creates an environment that promotes appropriate behavior

    • Reduction in problem behavior resulting in less staff time dealing with problems, more student time in the classroom

    • Improved perception of school safety, mental health

    • Improved academic performance

    • Improved social behavior performance

    • Less recidivism to more restrictive placements

    • Improved effectiveness and acceptability of individual interventions


    Resources l.jpg

    Resources

    • www.pbis.org

    • www.pbismaryland.org

    • www.swis.org

    • www.behaviordoctor.org

    • [email protected]

    • [email protected]


  • Login