Introduction to roman art
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Introduction to Roman ARt. Roman Coinage. Numismatics is the study of coins. What did coins tell us about a people? Advanced enough to have a currency system. Rich enough to have metals to make the coins. Had a stable enough for their coins to be considered of value.

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Roman coinage
Roman Coinage

  • Numismatics is the study of coins.

  • What did coins tell us about a people?

    • Advanced enough to have a currency system.

    • Rich enough to have metals to make the coins.

    • Had a stable enough for their coins to be considered of value.

  • What purpose besides monetary value did coins have?

    • Effective form of propaganda and advertisement.


Lets get numismaticing
Lets get Numismaticing!

  • The three major coins:

    • Aureus- Gold

    • Denarius- Silver - Worth 1/25 of an aureus

    • Sestertius- Bronze – Worth ¼ of a denarius

    • As- Copper - Worth ¼ of a sestertius

  • Standard daily wage for a laborer was one denarius.

  • Today's daily wage for a minimum wage worker is $60 or around $100 for a skilled worker.


Kleiner, Fred S. A History of Roman Art. Victoria: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2007. Print.


Kleiner, Fred S. A History of Roman Art. Victoria: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2007. Print.


Apollo from veii
Apollo from Veii

  • From the rooftop of an Etruscan temple.

  • 510 BCE.

  • Made of terracotta that was brightly painted, some color still remains.


Kleiner, Fred S. A History of Roman Art. Victoria: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2007. Print.


Capitoline she wolf
Capitoline She Wolf

  • 500 to 480 BCE.

  • Made of Bronze.

  • Not made by the Romans. This was created by the Etruscans.

  • Romulus and Remus may have been added later.


Kleiner, Fred S. A History of Roman Art. Victoria: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2007. Print.


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