Getting length into the classroom
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 34

Getting Length into the Classroom PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 93 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Getting Length into the Classroom. Rick Rogers. Kids. If anybody fancies having a rant about what our kids can’t do, now is your time. Kids can do things. Kids think things. As teachers we need to know what they can do and how they think.

Download Presentation

Getting Length into the Classroom

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Getting length into the classroom

Getting Length into the Classroom

Rick Rogers

SHP Conference 2011


Getting length into the classroom

Kids

  • If anybody fancies having a rant about what our kids can’t do, now is your time.

  • Kids can do things.

  • Kids think things.

  • As teachers we need to know what they can do and how they think.

  • Then we can this knowledge to help make them better.

  • Some people call this education.

SHP Conference 2011


A picture of some kids

A Picture of Some Kids

SHP Conference 2011


How kids think about the past

How kids think about the past

  • “Children cannot hold a big picture of the past in their heads.”

  • So what can they do?

  • What follows is an illustration of a starting point of a problem that I have been scratching at for years.

SHP Conference 2011


A task

A Task

  • An Essay question: What happened at the Battle of Waterloo, June 18th 1815?

  • A Year 9 girl wrote an essay.

  • She placed the following at the battle of Waterloo:

    • Napoleon Bonaparte

    • The Duke of Wellington

    • Oliver Cromwell

    • General George Custer

    • Julius Caesar

SHP Conference 2011


A process at work

A Process at Work?

  • Historical material is stored in the memory.

  • To place Custer, Cromwell, Caesar, Wellington and Napoleon in the same area, there must be a theme.

  • Possible the theme of battles.

  • When faced with a battle question, the battle information is recalled.

SHP Conference 2011


That s my big picture of the past

That’s my Big Picture of the Past

SHP Conference 2011


The big picture of the past

The Big Picture of the Past

SHP Conference 2011


Shaping the big picture

Shaping the Big Picture

SHP Conference 2011


How people understand the past

How People Understand the Past

SHP Conference 2011


The mural past versus the continuum past

The ‘Mural’ Past versus the Continuum Past

  • Question: What was life like in the Middle Ages?

  • Answer:

  • It was really hard. Everybody had to grow turnips and then go and work for the Lord. He rode around on his poor horse wearing a suit of armour. The Lord owned everything whilst all the poor people died of the Black Death.

SHP Conference 2011


The mural past versus the continuum past1

The ‘Mural’ Past versus the Continuum Past

  • Question: What was life like in the Middle Ages?

  • Answer:

  • When?

  • Where?

  • For whom?

SHP Conference 2011


Classroom task one darwin s beard

Classroom Task One: Darwin’s Beard

  • The problem is:

    • We ascribe facets to known phenomena from the past.

    • We can make judgements from these facets.

    • Facets change over time when we see the past as a continuum.

    • When we see the past as a mural, they don’t.

SHP Conference 2011


Histories

Histories

  • Example: Charles Darwin

  • Lived 1809 to 1882

  • Question: Did Charles Darwin have a large grey beard?

  • If ‘yes’ raise your right arm, if ‘no’ raise your left.

SHP Conference 2011


Classroom task two anne frank

Classroom Task Two: Anne Frank

Use the timeline of Anne Frank, your own knowledge and the hugely impressive encyclopaedic knowledge of your teacher to complete the Anne Frank grid.

  • 1929 Born

  • 1933 Nazi party was elected to power in Germany.

  • Summer 1933 The Franks moved to the Netherlands.

  • 1940 German forces invaded the Netherlands.

  • June 12, 1942 Anne's 13th birthday. Received diary.

  • July 6, 1942 The Frank family moved into hiding place

  • August 4, 1944 The Franks were arrested

  • September 2, 1944 Sent to Auschwitz.

  • April 1945 Anne died of typhus in Bergen-Belsen.

  • June 25, 1947 The Diary of Anne Frank went on sale.

SHP Conference 2011


Classroom task two anne frank1

Classroom Task Two: Anne Frank

In order to complete the Anne Frank grid you had to try to put to one side some of the things that came towards the end.

We need to ‘unknow’ some parts of history in order to better understand some of its moments.

Putting these moments back into context helps us to understand the development of history.

SHP Conference 2011


Classroom task two anne frank2

Classroom Task Two: Anne Frank

If we did the same thing with Anne Frank’s father, Otto, we would get a different variation.

Otto was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust.

He lived a comfortable life until he died in 1980.

He worked hard to spread the story of Anne’s life through her diary.

SHP Conference 2011


Classroom task two anne frank3

Classroom Task Two: Anne Frank

Anne versus Otto.

If you think Anne raise your right hand, if you think Otto raise your left.

Who died in the Holocaust?

Who survived the Holocaust?

Who enjoyed the greater freedom in their lives?

Who suffered the most?

Who was the most tragic figure?

SHP Conference 2011


The most evil

The Most Evil?

  • Who is the most evil, Adolf Hitler or Rick Rogers?

  • The future life of Rick Rogers:

    • Will take up leadership of the Liberal Democrats

    • Will use demonic rhetoric to whip them into a frenzy.

    • They will then perpetrate mass murder of all those that they don’t regard as being nice.

SHP Conference 2011


Games in time

Games in Time.

  • Let’s transplant the life of Rogers back 100 years.

  • The only information in the public domain is an incident where the irate schoolteacher shouted at an innocent looking young boy.

  • We then landed in Berlin in November 1944. We asked TraudlJunge the same question.

  • In 1916 Belgium, we also asked the same question of the officer, commanding Hitler’s company.

SHP Conference 2011


Classroom task three causation maps

Classroom Task Three: Causation Maps

  • A visual representation of change over time.

  • The aim is to show students that history is a combination of processes over time.

  • It is a not a set of different pictures

SHP Conference 2011


Uses of causation maps revision

Uses of Causation Maps – Revision

  • Annotate the map with events.

  • The Map on the downfall of Napoleon’s empire is an aid for A level.

  • Towards the end of the course, the teacher took the students through the process.

  • They made a record on the sheet for revision purposes.

SHP Conference 2011


Uses of causation maps ks3 familiarising through matching

Uses of Causation Maps – KS3 Familiarising through Matching

  • The students have to work out through the changes in the shapes which strand pertains to which definition.

  • This emphasises to the students the nature of the changes in terms of the substantive history.

SHP Conference 2011


Uses of causation maps omission to stress significance

Uses of Causation Maps – Omission to stress significance

  • The causation maps in this session were made by Rick Rogers.

  • Rick Rogers is a teacher therefore the causation maps are correct.

  • The way that it stresses the importance of the Popish Plot of 1678, er.........

  • Oh, it’s not there!

  • The causation map is wrong!!!!!!

SHP Conference 2011


Uses of causation maps omission to stress significance1

Uses of Causation Maps – Omission to stress significance

  • On the Gunpowder Plot map, let’s suppose any reflection of the execution of Mary Queen of Scots, the Spanish Armada or the restoration of Charles II is missed off.

  • We then give the kids a list of these to use to label the map.

  • They realise the map has omissions.

  • The students make the map ‘right’.

  • We then show them the next slide.

SHP Conference 2011


Uses of causation maps omission to stress significance2

Uses of Causation Maps – Omission to stress significance

  • The reign of Lady Jane Grey.

  • The Battle of Namur

  • Singeing the king of Spain’s beard

  • The Earl of Essex’s rebellion

  • The dissolving of the Rump Parliament in 1653

  • John Churchill’s defection to William of Orange

SHP Conference 2011


Uses of causation maps omission to stress significance3

Uses of Causation Maps – Omission to stress significance

  • The Pilgrimage of Grace

  • The rule of the Major Generals

  • Founding of the Bank of England

  • Reforms of the Poor Law

  • Death of Mary II

  • War with Spain and France in the 1620s

  • The battle of Solway Moss

SHP Conference 2011


Inclusion and omission

Inclusion and Omission

  • What to include is a fundamental operation in the construction of history.

  • As an example, take any weighty historical biography.

  • Ask the students, so what did X have for breakfast on date Y?

  • It’s not there.

  • The biography is not, therefore, useful.

SHP Conference 2011


Classroom task four inevitability

Classroom Task Four: Inevitability

  • Things that have happened, had to happen.

  • Why?

  • Because they happened.

  • Did these things have to happen?

  • Yes because they did happen.

  • What if they had not happened?

  • But they did happen.

SHP Conference 2011


Or put another way

Or put another way....

  • Why did World War Two happen?

  • Because all these causes made it happen.

  • What did these factors cause?

  • They caused World War Two?

  • Did World War Two have to happen?

  • Yes because these causes were there.

  • So if these causes were not there, would World War Two have happened?

  • But they were there, so it had to happen.

SHP Conference 2011


If the past is inevitable

If the past is inevitable....

SHP Conference 2011


The bradford city fire

The Bradford City Fire

  • Three causes (two conditions and one trigger):

    • Litter

    • Wooden stand

    • Lit cigarette

  • Was this inevitable?

  • Why did it not happen earlier?

  • Why could it not have happened after it did?

SHP Conference 2011


The plenary session

The Plenary Session

  • So what have we learned from this workshop?

  • I hope you might consider:

    • The way that students think about the past

    • Mural versus continuum past

    • Activities that dig around in your students heads and reveal what they think about the past.

SHP Conference 2011


Workshop documents

Workshop Documents

  • Available at:

    • Rickinthenorth.wordpress.com

SHP Conference 2011


  • Login