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Team Members: Blake Samic Brent Adams Dan Healy Chris Kantus Chad Linville Aaron Frees Advocacy Team: Kyle Minnick - Mentor Thiago Tognetti- Mentor Rob Willy - Mentor. AP5 Capillary Tube Scrap Reduction. Problem Area.

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Presentation Transcript

Team Members:

Blake Samic

Brent Adams

Dan Healy

Chris Kantus

Chad Linville

Aaron Frees

Advocacy Team:

Kyle Minnick - Mentor

Thiago Tognetti- Mentor

Rob Willy - Mentor



Problem Area

Inside Case

Refrigerator

Smaller capillary tube is still clearly attached to the large tube assembly.

Outside Case

Capillary tube is no longer visible outside of the case, indicating that it has been broken off at the entrance to the cas.


Possible Root Causes

  • Excessive bending of capillary tube during production

    • Many stations bend tube multiple times

    • May strain material, causing breakage further down the line

  • Missing/Misplaced protective tape on tube

    • Unprotected tube rubs on raw edge of case back

    • Rubbing may score tube, causing breakage

  • Reuse of salvaged capillary tube assemblies

    • Rerun tube undergoes more bending than normal

  • Holes in assembly at liner drop

    • Capillary can become hung up in holes causing severe scoring of the capillary tube


Freezer Liner Formation

Process Flow

Hole in conveyor identified as definite contributor to broken tubes.

Reuse of capillary tubes of scrapped freezer liners identified as possible secondary cause. Reused tubes are currently being tagged to help identify whether this is a contributor to the issue.

Plastic liner to which cap tube will be assembled is formed.

Case Line

Capillary Tube is foamed into the finished case making it impossible to easily replace.

Capillary Tube from Supplier

Capillary Tube is attached to the formed plastic liner.

Capillary Tube is attached to the formed plastic liner.

Tube arrives from outsourced supplier.

Capillary Tube is attached to the formed plastic liner.

Possible poor tube design identified by PMQ could be contributing to broken tubes.

Testing and Packaging

Repair

Assembly

Somewhere in assmebly the broken capillary tube is identified by a worker and marked out for repair.

Somewhere in assmebly the broken capillary tube is identified by a worker and marked out for repair.

Refrigerators are scrapped at repair and never make it to test and pack.

Ends of capillary tube assembly are brazed to the evaporator and hi side assembly.


Financial / Business Benefits

  • Hard Benefits

  • Elimination of 3 or more scrapped units per week ($45,000/Yr)

  • Elimination of 3 scrapped units per week ($45,000/Yr)

  • Soft Benefits

  • Labor reduction

  • Less rework and salvage time with scrapped units

  • Fewer salvaged parts returned to line

  • Labor reduction

  • Less rework and salvage time with scrapped units

  • Fewer salvaged parts returned to the line


Actions

  • Identified hole in the case assembly line were capillary tubes were becoming snagged and scored. Hole was temporarily covered by Case Line BTL Kyle Minnick and in long term the hole will be permantently bolted shut.

  • All rerun capillary tubes off of scrapped liners are being marked in or to discern whether the rerunning of these tubes is contributing to the issue

  • Note: After covering the hole on the assembly line no broken capillary tubes were seen for a week and a half. A few were seen at the end of last week but we are unsure if these breaks are caused by the same one that has been causing the three or so a week. None of the units with broken tubes have yet to be from a rerun tube off of a bad liner.


  • Future:

  • Plan to place metal slugs into assembly line to cover any and all holes where tube may become caught.

  • No reuse of capillary tubes (if long term results indicate that this contributes to problem.

  • Current:

  • On average 3 or more completed units per week are scrapped because of broken capillary tubes.

  • 3 units a week are scrapped due to broken capillary tubes with costing the business $45,000 annually

  • Place metal slugs in all holes on assembly line where the capillary tube may hang up

  • Possibility of not rerunning capillary tubes off of scrapped liners


Capillary Tube Project Contacts

Jay Fields (BTL Case Line)

Kyle Minnick (BTL Case Line)

Gene Pikes (Tech Support Case)

Martin Pike (Inspector Assembly Line)

Larry Byrne (EOLA Technician)

Larry Crouch (Test and Pack Repairman)

Mike Mulcahy (BTL Case Line)

Del Cofield (Blackbelt AP4/5)


What we gained from our lean experience

We learned how to:

  • C •communicate with individuals out on the floor to work towards a common goal

  • •to research an issue of which we had no prior knowledge

  • •how to formulate a plan of attack in order to solve the issue

  • •work together with teammates on a project that would otherwise be to large and time consuming to

  • u undertake alone.

We learned never to:

  • • start investigating an area in a union factory without first consulting the union steward.

  • • take pictures of any union personel on the job.

  • n• ever to bring a camera, stopwatch, or large group of engineers into an area and start asking questions without first having the proper meetings with union officials.


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