Slide1 l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 1

LOGO PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 84 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

A Comparative Study of Energy Usage by American and Japan, over the last Ten Years Joan Kibaara (LU) :: Anisah Nu’Man (SC) :: Lee Smalls Jr. (ECSU) :: Donnell Terry (SU) :: Jessica Wilson (TSU) Mentor : Dr. Krishna Kulknari. LOGO. LOGO.

Download Presentation

LOGO

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Slide1 l.jpg

A Comparative Study of Energy Usage by American and Japan, over the last Ten YearsJoan Kibaara (LU) :: Anisah Nu’Man (SC) :: Lee Smalls Jr. (ECSU) :: Donnell Terry (SU) :: Jessica Wilson (TSU) Mentor : Dr. Krishna Kulknari

LOGO

LOGO

We used information from the Energy Information Association (EIA) to compare the energy consumption of the US and Japan. In order to find the consumption for every one thousand people, we took the consumption for each source of energy, and multiplied by one thousand. After getting the results, we then divided by the population into 1000, which gave us a level field of comparison. From the data we collected we can identify a trend of how much energy is being used by both nations. The data shows that as the population increases year by year, the consumption of most energy sources increase also. The US consumption of coal, electricity, and oil has increased since 1996. Natural gas consumption is the only source of energy that has decreased since the mid 90’s. In contrast to the US, Japan’s oil consumption has steadily been decreasing from 1996 to 2005. On the other hand Japan’s usage of coal, natural gas, and electricity has been increasing. With the consumption of energy for every one thousand people we were able to compare the consumption of energy for both countries by using regression plots. The regression plots allow us to determine whether a correlation exists between the energy usage of Japan and the US. Overall we were able to conclude that no systematic comparison can be made between the energy usage of Japan and America. In addition we concluded that there exist similar trends in the scatter plots of natural gas and coal usage between American and Japan. From 1996-2005 both countries had a decrease in usage of natural gas and coal. Similarly oil and electricity usage was random and had not correlation between the two countries.

Abstract

Data & Analysis

Within this study we used regression analysis to test the relationship between US energy consumption and Japan’s energy consumption. A linear regression was used to calculate the equation that best fits a straight line from compiled data. . We used Minitab and Excel, computer programs, to calculate equation of a line representing the regression of y on x. Using the prorated table of energy consumption for the US and Japan we plotted a fitted line scatter plot for each form of energy. Prorated US

Energy is the vital force powering business, manufacturing and the transportation of goods and services to serve the American and world economies. The research is focused on energy used by America and Japan, from 1996 to 2005. We will be using existing data on Japan and America to compute percentages of natural resources such as oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity. We will use British Thermal Unit (BTU) which is s unit for measuring heat quantity in the customary system of English units of measurement, equal to the amount of heat requited to raise the temperature of one pound of water at its maximum density. After compiling the data, we calculate the consumption for every 1000 people, for each country. In doing this we were able to see which country used the most energy regardless of population. We were then able to form the line of regression to give a visual comparison of energy usage between the US and Japan.

Prorated Japan

Introduction

The project will be a comparison of electricity, natural gas, coal and oil. Electricity is the most widely used type of energy in the world, and its main providers are light and heat. Electricity is defined as a physical phenomena arising from the behavior of electrons and protons that is caused by the attraction of particles with opposite charges and the repulsion of particles with the same charge. Natural gas is one of the cheapest forms of energy available to the residential consumer, and is most commonly used for cooking and residential heating. Natural gas is defined as a mixture of hydrocarbon gases that occurs naturally beneath the Earth’s surface, often with or near petroleum deposits containing mostly methane but has varying amounts of ethane, propane, butane, and nitrogen. Coal has many important uses, but most significantly in electricity generation, steel and cement manufacture, and industrial process heating. Coal is defined as a natural dark brown to black graphite-like material used as a fuel, formed from fossilized plants and consisting of amorphous carbon with various organic and some inorganic compounds. Oil is used for gasoline, aviation fuels, diesel and heating oil, residual fuel oil, asphalt and lubricants. Oil is defined as any of numerous mineral, vegetable, and synthetic substances that are generally slippery, combustible, viscous, liquid or liquefiable at room temperatures, soluble in various organic solvents such as ether but not in water. Since these sources of energy play such an important role in our daily lives, we hope this project will encourage people to take precaution when using energy sources.

Results & Conclusion

References

  • The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. Retrieved May 20, 2008. <Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/electricity>.

  • The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. Retrieved May 20, 2008. <Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/natural gas>.

  • The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. Retrieved May 20, 2008. <Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/coal>.

  • The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. Retrieved May 20, 2008. <Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/oil>.

  • Energy Information Administration.United States Energy Profile Retrieved May 15, 2008http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/country/country_time_series.cfm?fips=US

  • Energy Information Administration.Japan Energy Profile Retrievedhttp://tonto.eia.doe.gov/country/country_energy_data.cfm?fips=JA

  • Retrieved May 21, 2008, fromhttp://www.theodora.com/wfb/


  • Login