More on parts of speech really
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More on parts of speech! Really?. Compound Nouns vs. Collective Nouns. Compound Noun—a noun that includes more than one word Examples: living room, home run, record player, break-in, attorney-at-law, twenty-one, birdhouse, headband, flashlight.

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More on parts of speech! Really?

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More on parts of speech really

More on parts of speech! Really?


Compound nouns vs collective nouns

Compound Nouns vs. Collective Nouns

Compound Noun—a noun that includes more than one word

Examples: living room, home run, record player, break-in, attorney-at-law, twenty-one, birdhouse, headband, flashlight


More on parts of speech really

Collective Noun—a noun that names a group of people or things

Examples: team, family, herd, choir, jury


Choose whether the underlined word is a compound noun or a collective noun

Choose whether the underlined word is a compound noun or a collective noun.

  • Our class will meet with the mayor at city hall.

    2. Our new high school will open next week.

    3. My sister went to school at night to study speed-reading.

    4. My brother-in-law lost his credit card recently.

    5. The prizewinner was surrounded by a group of fans.


Common nouns vs proper nouns

Common Nouns vs. Proper Nouns

Common Noun—Names any person, place, or thing

Examples: man, city, building, team

Proper Noun—names a particular person, place, or thing

Examples: Mr. Henry Collins, Chicago, New York Yankees


Choose whether the underlined nouns are common or proper

Choose whether the underlined nouns are common or proper.

  • In Colombia, ants are sold as snacks from carts along the street.

  • Fried worms are eaten in Mexico.

  • People in Uganda crush flies and shape them into pancakes for lunch.

  • In other parts of Africa, termites are munched like pretzels.

  • Certain spiders are roasted in New Guinea.


Game time

Game Time!

You have thirty seconds to divide into groups. Match your numbers to find your groups.

The winning group gets a prize!


Pronoun antecedents

Pronoun Antecedents

Pronoun Antecedents—a noun that a pronoun refers to or replaces

Examples:

  • Dion said that he couldn’t go.

  • Alan caught the ball and threw it to first base.

  • Lynn asked Sandy, “Did we miss a turn?”


Personal pronouns

Personal Pronouns

First Person (The person speaking)

Singular: I, me, my, mine

Plural: we, us, our, ours

Second Person (The person spoken to)

Singular: you, your, yours

Plural: you, your, yours

Third Person (The person or thing spoken about)

Singular: he, him, his, she, her, hers, it, its

Plural: they, them, their, theirs


Reflexive pronouns

Reflexive Pronouns

These pronouns are formed by adding “-self” or “-selves” to certain personal pronouns.

Singular: myself, yourself, himself, itself

Plural: ourselves, yourselves, themselves


Indefinite pronouns

Indefinite Pronouns

  • These pronouns very often refer to unnamed people or things.


Common indefinite pronouns

Common Indefinite Pronouns

allbothfewnothing

anothereachmany one

anyeithermostseveral

anybodyeverybodyneithersome

anyoneeveryonenonesomeone

anythingeverythingno onesomething


Other types of pronouns

Other Types of Pronouns

Demonstrative Pronouns:

this, that, these, those

Interrogative Pronouns:

what, which, who, whom, whose


Game time1

Game Time!

You have thirty seconds to divide into groups. Match your numbers to find your groups.

The winning group gets a prize!


Types of verbs

Types of Verbs

Action Verb—tells what a subject is performing

Examples: Dad plants tulip bulbs every fall.

Karen skated across the frozen pond.

Linking Verb—links the subject with another word in the sentence

Examples: Tim is my brother.

The weather has been very cold.


Common linking verbs

Common Linking Verbs

beshall behave been

iswill behas been

amcan behad been

arecould becould have been

wasshould beshould have been

werewould bemay have been

may bemight have been

might bemust have been


Additional linking verbs

Additional Linking Verbs

appeargrowseemstay

becomelooksmelltaste

feelremainsoundturn


Action verb vs linking verb

Action Verb vs. Linking Verb

  • The evening breeze felt cool.

    2. My neighbor grows tomatoes in her backyard.

    3. Peggy looked everywhere for Danielle.

    4. Those shoes look very comfortable.


Adjectives vs adverbs

Adjectives vs. Adverbs

Adjectives—modify nouns and pronouns

Answer Questions: Which one? What kind?

How many? Whose?

Adverbs—modify adjectives, verbs, and other adverbs

Answer Questions: Where? When? How?

To what extent?


Adjective or adverb

Adjective or Adverb?

  • My early appointment was canceled.

  • The music was too lively for me.

  • Their large historic house is located high on the grassy knolls.

  • We carelessly locked the keys in the car.

  • Our new microwave oven works well.

  • Bears are definitely not friendly.


Prepositional phrases

Prepositional Phrases

  • A nurse at a London hospital had a young girl in her ward.

  • None of the doctors could find a cure for her.

  • Before work, the nurse began reading another chapter in a mystery by Agatha Christie.

  • After several pages, she put the book into her bag and hurried to the hospital.

  • According to the book, someone had taken a rare poison called thallium.


Preposition or adverb

Preposition or Adverb?

  • Walk the pony around the rink.

  • “Be careful that you don’t fall off,” he shouted.

  • Everyone sang as the flag went up.

  • George did his exercises before breakfast.

  • If you go outside, take your key.


Game time2

Game Time!

You have thirty seconds to divide into groups. Match your numbers to find your groups.

The winning group gets a prize!


More on parts of speech really

Linking Verbs vs. Action VerbsPick out the subject and the verb, and then tell whether the verb is action or linking.

  • Have you felt the material on the sofa?

  • Her voice sounds so pleasant over the phone.

  • Our cat grows hungry at night.

  • The bugle sounded the start of the race.

  • The photographs turned dull with age.


Adjectives vs adverbs tell whether the underlined word is an adjective or an adverb

Adjectives vs. AdverbsTell whether the underlined word is an adjective or an adverb.

  • The large American flag waved gently in the breeze.

  • She spoke softly and tenderly to the baby.

  • Jess wrapped the expensive presents beautifully.

  • The math test was extremely hard.

  • The market will soon receive Idaho potatoes.


Prepositional phrases pick out the prepositional phrases

Prepositional PhrasesPick out the prepositional phrases.

  • The description of the victims symptoms exactly matched the symptoms of the young girl.

  • The nurse placed the book in front of the doctors.

  • She told them about her suspicions.

  • Within minutes the doctors prescribed a new series of treatments for the girl.

  • Because of a mystery by Agatha Christie, a young girl’s life was saved.


Preposition vs adverb tell whether the underlined word is a preposition or an adverb

Preposition vs. AdverbTell whether the underlined word is a preposition or an adverb.

  • A blizzard was raging outside the warm house.

  • Haven’t I met you before?

  • We looked around but couldn’t find them.

  • All the marbles rolled off the table.

  • Up the hill raced the boys on their bikes.


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