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Field release and evaluation of Tamarixia radiata parasitism against Asian citrus psyllid. Jawwad A. Qureshi and Philip A. Stansly Southwest Florida Research and Education Center. Parasitoid: Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae). Adult. Larva. Egg. A. Urebaneja. Mummies.

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Field release and evaluation of Tamarixia radiata parasitism against Asian citrus psyllid

Jawwad A. Qureshi and Philip A. Stansly

Southwest Florida Research and Education Center


Parasitoid: Tamarixia radiata

(Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

Adult

Larva

Egg

A. Urebaneja

Mummies

Prepupa

M. Rogers


Our efforts to enhance parasitism rates of t radiata in the united states
Our efforts to enhance parasitism rates of T. radiata in the United States

  • Statewide evaluation of T. radiata parasitism from previously released and established parasitoids imported from Taiwan and south Vietnam by Hoy and Nguyen (1999-2000) (Qureshi et al. 2009)

  • Import and introduction of T. radiatafrom Pakistan, South China, and North Vietnam, and their genetic characterization (Barr et al. 2010)

  • Mass production and release of previously established and new parasitoids

  • Collaboration with Orange Co. and DPI to establish large scale mass rearing facilities

  • Evaluation of parasitism rates of newly released parasitoids


Previous and recent releases of t radiata in florida
Previous and recent releases of T. radiata in Florida

  • 1999 – 2001: 37, 000 from colonies established at DPI Gainesville, FL, from parasitoids imported from Taiwan and south Vietnam (Hoy and Nguyen 2001, Skelly and Hoy 2004)

  • 2009 (Mar – Dec): 32, 000 from colony

    established at Southwest Florida Research

    and Education Center (SWFREC),

    Immokalee, FL, from previously imported

    and established parasitoids

  • 2009-10 (Oct – Jan): 36, 000from colonies established at DPI Gainesville, FL, from parasitoids imported from Pakistan, South China, and North Vietnam


Methods to evaluate parasitism rates

  • Cages with apertures to allow parasitoids but not the large size predators to access the colonies in the field.

    (Michaud, 2004, Qureshi and Stansly, 2009)

Larva

Egg

  • Examination of nymphs under the

    microscope to look for parasitoid eggs

    larvae or pupae (Qureshi et al. 2009)

Prepupa


Methods to evaluate parasitism rates

  • Laboratory rearing of field collected

    nymphs through adult emergence.

  • (Qureshi and Stansly, 2009, Qureshi et al. 2009)

  • Exposure of plants infested with

    psyllid nymphs to natural populations

    of the parasitoid in the field

    (Qureshi and Stansly, 2009)


Incidence of parasitism by T. radiata on citrus in three regions of Florida

56%

39%

20%

Qureshi et al. (2009)


Incidence of parasitism by T. radiata oncitrus in experimental blocks at SWFREC

Qureshi and Stansly (2009)


Incidence of parasitism by T. radiata on citrus in Isabela, Puerto Rico

2004 - 05

Pluke et. al. (2008)


Releases of t radiata imported from taiwan and south vietnam
Releases of T. radiata imported from Taiwan and South Vietnam


Releases of t radiata imported from pakistan south china and north vietnam
Releases of T. radiata imported from Pakistan, South China, and North Vietnam


Incidence of parasitism by T. radiata at SWFREC

2009


Highest parasitism observed during Oct – Nov in conventional groves with and without T. radiata releases, 2009

Parasitism (%)

Average

n = 49

20%

n = 35

n = 491

10%

n = 28

Groves with releases

Groves without releases


Parasitism rates in groves with releases of newly imported conventional groves with and without T. radiata (October 2009)

n = 1094

n = 21

n = 10

S. China

Pakistan

N. Vietnam


Nymphs parasitized by conventional groves with and without T. radiata on sentinel plants exposed for two to three weeks at SWFREC and a conventional grove, Immokalee, FL

n = 50

n = 28

n = 188

n = 296

n = 416


Conclusions and Future Directions conventional groves with and without

  • Colonies of previously established and recently imported strains from Pakistan, South China, and North Vietnam are now well established

  • Mass production, release and evaluation in progress

  • Parasitism rates of 40-60% were observed when more nymphs were available in the groves or recovered on sentinel plants

  • Parasitism rates averaged 50% more in the groves where releases were made compared to groves with no releases

  • More T. radiatawill be produced and released in 2010, particularly in spring flush

  • Impact of releases will be measured in both treated and untreated conventional and organic groves


Acknowledgements conventional groves with and without

  • Funding: Florida Citrus Production Research Advisory Council

  • All participating growers and collaborators from Pakistan, China, and Vietnam

  • Division of Plant Industry for quarantine facility and Ru Nguyen for rearing of imported strains

  • Animal Plant Health and Inspection Service for permit to release the newly imported strains

  • M. Triana, J. Mendez, S. Croxton, UF-IFAS Immokalee for technical assistance


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