Reform politics the gilded age
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 27

Reform, Politics, & the Gilded Age PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 109 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Reform, Politics, & the Gilded Age. Reformers. Social Gospel Movement preached salvation thru service to the poor inspired people to build churches in poor communities and convinced some business leaders to treat workers more fairly. Reformers. Settlement-house Movement

Download Presentation

Reform, Politics, & the Gilded Age

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Reform politics the gilded age

Reform, Politics, & the Gilded Age

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reformers

Reformers

  • Social Gospel Movement

    • preached salvation thru service to the poor

    • inspired people to build churches in poor communities and convinced some business leaders to treat workers more fairly

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reformers1

Reformers

  • Settlement-house Movement

    • community centers in slum neighborhoods that gave assistance and friendship to locals - especially immigrants

    • ran mostly by middle-class, college-educated women

    • promote education, culture, and social services

    • provide classes - English, health, crafts, drama, music, etc.

    • sent nurses to homes of sick, injured, etc.

    • Jane Addams - co-founder of Chicago's Hull House - 1889

    • Locust Street Social Settlement - Hampton, VA - 1st one for African Americans

Created by Katherine Lacks


The political machine

The Political Machine

Organization (city bosses)

  • organized group that controlled activities of a political party in a city

  • offered services to voters and business in exchange for political and financial support

  • voters received city jobs, contracts, political appointments in exchange for votes

  • organized like a pyramid

Created by Katherine Lacks


The political machine1

The Political Machine

  • City Boss – controlled the political party throughout the city

  • Ward Boss – worked to gain all precinct’s support during elections

  • Local precinct workers and captains – gained voter support on block or in neighborhood

Created by Katherine Lacks


The political boss

The Political Boss

  • controlled 1000s of city jobs (including police, fire, sanitation), business licenses and inspections, influenced courts and agencies

  • helped solve many urban problems which won loyalty from voters

  • built parks, sewer systems, waterworks, gave money to schools, hospitals, orphanages, etc.

Created by Katherine Lacks


The political boss1

The Political Boss

  • many were 1st or 2nd generation immigrants and had worked their way up from poverty

  • spoke language and could relate to immigrant problems

  • able to provide solutions

  • helped immigrants become naturalized, find place to live and get a job in exchange for votes

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Corruption was widespread during this era in the government

The rapid industrialization led to rapid urbanization and local governments could not keep up with the fast rate of city growth

Immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe had no knowledge of democratic society and were easy prey for city bosses

Businessmen were closely linked with big city bosses making corruption hard to fight

Created by Katherine Lacks


Graft scandal

Graft & Scandal

  • fraudulent elections - use names of dogs, kids, deceased as voters

  • graft - misuse of power

    • turning in a bill higher than actual cost and "kickback" (illegal payments) go to the machine

    • granting favors to businesses in return for cash

    • accepting bribes to allow illegal activities

Created by Katherine Lacks


Tweed ring

Tweed Ring

  • William Marcy Tweed - head of Tammany Hall - NYC's powerful Democratic political machine (1863)

  • pocketed @ $200 million from city in kickbacks (1869-1871)

  • finally broken up in 1871

  • Tweed indicted on 220 counts of fraud and extortion - sentenced to 12 years

  • escaped after serving 2 years but recaptured in Spain later

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

William Marcy “Boss” Tweed

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today (1873)

A novel by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner which explored political and economic corruption in the U.S.

The phrase “Gilded Age”, commonly given to the era, comes from the title of this book. The term gilded means to be covered with gold.

Twain and Warner used it in the novel to refer to a city, which from a distance, looked as if it was made of gold, but instead, was covered in cheap gold paint. This was a symbol of the truth about America, where corporations like the railroad companies told lies about streets made of gold to attract immigrants to work for them.

The two major characters, Colonel Beriah Sellers and Senator Abner Dilworthy, are linked together by a government railroad bribery scheme.

Twain and Warner depicted an American society that on the surface appeared prosperous and full of opportunities but underneath was corrupt and scandalous.

Twain

Warner

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Gilded- “to make appear more bright and attractive”

“An era of slums and palaces”

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Reasons that the RICH were so rich (and there were few of them) and the POOR were so poor (and there were so many of them)

  • No income taxes

  • No Government regulations on business (at first)

  • No unions to protect workers & help increase wages

  • Lack of proper education & Child Labor

  • Strong Belief in Social Darwinism (among “Rich”)

  • Massive graft and corruption

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

The Palaces

of The

Gilded

Age

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Biltmore

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Built by George Washington Vanderbilt between 1888 & 1895

Ashville, NC

Largest privately owned home in the US

255 rooms; 175,000 sq. ft.

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

George Washington Vanderbilt

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

The Breakers

Newport, RI

Summer home of Vanderbilt

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Hearst Castle

San Simeon, CA

William Randolph Hearst

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Chateau-sur-Mer

Newport, RI

William Wetmore

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Marble House

Newport, RI

Vanderbilt’s grandson

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Rose Cliff

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

Whitehall

Created by Katherine Lacks


Reform politics the gilded age

The wealthy who built the amazing homes were “industrial giants” and the new “ultra” rich who’s families had succeeded in America beyond belief

Created by Katherine Lacks


  • Login