Mexican traditions
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Mexican traditions

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Mexican traditions

Mexican traditions

In Mexico, thereare so many traditions that it would be impossibleto describe all of them. Although,I'mgiving a bit of explanationabout those that really are famous and importantsuch as the independenceday, 5th of Mayo, the day of the dead…But we can think of Christmas,marriages and many more!


Bullfighting

Bullfighting

  • Basically the bulls is killed in a bullring by the matador as a public spectacle, also known as ‘Fiesta Brava’

  • As Spain occupied Mexico for 300 years, bullfighting remains one of the most popular sport in the country

  • The main difference between bullfighting in Spain and in Mexico is that in Spain the matador is cheered for whereas the bull is cheered for in Mexico

  • Mexican bullfighting is closer to Spanish bullfighting style than any other style; the bullfighting show includes rodeos, pig chase and dancing before the bullfighting starts. In the end, the bull is killed with a sword


Mexican traditions

  • There are thousands of bullfighting events every year all over the country. These events are good occasions to make profits because they appeal lots of Mexicans but also loads of tourists

  • The largest bullring is in Mexico City , it’s known as Plaza Mexico, it can seat around 45,000 people

  • Even if it represents one of the most popular sport in Mexico, loads of people complain about it as it’s dangerous for the matador, the horse and the bull…

  • It remains prominent during the ‘dry’ season so between November and March


Indep enden ce day

Independenceday

  • September 16, 1810: Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a roman catholic priest from Dolores who was involved in the revolt against the Spanish colonial government, ordered the church bells to be rung, then he addressed to the people in front of his church a speech encouraging them to revolt. That’s known as Hidalgo’s grito

  • Every year since 1810, on September 15th, the same tradition happens. Around 11pm, the president of Mexico rings the bell of National Palace in the capital, then he repeats a ‘cry of patriotism’, in which he names all the important heroes of the Mexican War of Independence and ends by the ‘cry of independence’: ¡Viva México!; then he rings the bell again and finishes by waving the flag of Mexico. After that the crowd starts singing the national anthem

  • In every city or town in Mexico the same thing happens with the Mayor or governor. Here in Monterrey, the ‘show’ occurs at the Macro Plaza


Cinc o de mayo

CincodeMayo

  • This date commemorate the defeat of France in the battle of Puebla in 1862. Basically Mexico refused to make interest payment to France who then decided to invade and occupied Mexico. The general Ignacio Zaragoza beat a better equipped French army.

  • Plus, it’s an important date because since the battle of Puebla, no countries in America has been beaten by a European military force.

  • Cinco de Mayo is a regional holiday (state of Puebla). Festivities include indulgence in traditional Mexican food, music and dance.


Virgen de gua dalupe

Virgen deGuadalupe

  • Also known as ‘NuestraSeñora de Guadalupe’ (our lady of Guadalupe), she is a celebrated catholic image of the Virgin Mary. According to the tradition, her image appeared to a Mexican peasant on December 12, 1531

  • The virgin of Guadalupe is today Mexico’s most popular religious and cultural image as she’s also known as ‘Queen of Mexico’

  • When Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla initiated the bid for Mexican independence with his ‘Grito de Dolores’ he started with the cry ‘Death to the Spaniards and long live the Virgin of Guadalupe!’


Mexican traditions

  • It’s now one of the most important date for the country. Thousands of the faithful from around the country make the most important pilgrimage to the ‘Basílica of Guadalupe’, in Mexico City, where the miraculous image of the ‘Virgen Morena’ is kept.

  • Over the 11th to the 12th December 2009, a record number of 6.1 million pilgrims visited the Basilica of Guadalupe in Mexico to commemorate the anniversary of the apparition.

  • Some of the pilgrims arrive on their knees as a sign of their enormous devotion and gratitude for a favor received. There are many groups of dancers and musicians  that have come to offer their art to the Virgin. By nighttime, the atrium is filled to bursting with pilgrims. People of all ages and of all regions of the country gather together, physically as well as spiritually. 


Mexican traditions

Over the 11th to the 12th December 2009, a record number of 6.1 million pilgrims visited the Basilica of Guadalupe in Mexico to commemorate the anniversary of the apparition.

Some of the pilgrims arrive on their knees as a sign of their enormous devotion and gratitude for a favor received. There are many groups of dancers and musicians  that have come to offer their art to the Virgin. By nighttime, the atrium is filled to bursting with pilgrims. People of all ages and of all regions of the country gather together, physically as well as spiritually. 


D a d e los mu ertos

Día de los Muertos

  • The ‘Day of the Dead’ is a national holiday that focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who are dead.

  • In most regions of Mexico, children and infant are honored on November 1st (Day of the Innocents or Day of the Little Angels) , whereas deceased adults are honored on November 2nd(Día de los Muertos).

  • People go to cemeteries to be with the souls of the dead and build private altars with the favorite foods and drinks and some pictures of the departed.

  • During the three-day period, families usually clean and decorate graves. They offered toys to dead children and bottles of tequila or mezcal to adults. In many places, people have picnics at the grave site.


Mexican traditions

  • In some parts of the country, children in costumes roam the streets, knocking on people's doors for a ‘calaverita’, a small gift of candies or money. This custom is similar to that of Halloween's trick-or-treating.

  • Ofrendas’ are also left at home. Pillows are left outside so the departed can rest after their long journey.

  • Some people believe that possessing Day of the Dead items can bring good luck. Many people get tattoos.


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