Unit 4 chapter 20 postwar social change chapter 21 politics and prosperity
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UNIT 4 Chapter 20 – Postwar Social Change Chapter 21 – Politics and Prosperity. THE ROARIN 20’s. Presidents of the United States. #21 - … Chester A. Arthur; Republican (1881) Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1884) Benjamin Harrison; Republican (1888) Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1892)

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UNIT 4 Chapter 20 – Postwar Social Change Chapter 21 – Politics and Prosperity

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Unit 4 chapter 20 postwar social change chapter 21 politics and prosperity

UNIT 4Chapter 20 – Postwar Social ChangeChapter 21 – Politics and Prosperity

THE ROARIN 20’s


Presidents of the united states

Presidents of the United States

  • #21 - …

    • Chester A. Arthur; Republican (1881)

  • Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1884)

  • Benjamin Harrison; Republican (1888)

  • Grover Cleveland; Democrat (1892)

  • William McKinley; Republican (1896)

  • Theodore Roosevelt; Republican (1901)

  • William Howard Taft; Republican (1908)

  • Woodrow Wilson; Democrat (1912)

  • Warren G. Harding; Republican (1920)

  • Calvin Coolidge; Republican (1923)

  • Herbert Hoover; Republican (1928)

George Washington; Federalist (1788)

John Adams; Federalist (1796)

Thomas Jefferson (1800)

James Madison (1808)

James Monroe (1816)

John Quincy Adams (1824)

Andrew Jackson; Democrat (1828)

Martin Van Buren; Democrat (1836)

William Henry Harrison; Whig (1840)

John Tyler; Whig (1841)

James K. Polk; Democrat (1844)

Zachary Taylor; Whig (1848)

Millard Fillmore; Whig (1850)

Franklin Pierce; Democrat (1852)

James Buchanan; Democrat (1856)

Abraham Lincoln; Republican (1860)

Andrew Johnson; Democrat (1865)

Ulysses S. Grant; Republican (1868)

Rutherford B. Hayes; Republican (1876)

James Garfield; Republican (1880)


Unit 4 chapter 20 postwar social change chapter 21 politics and prosperity

America: Pathways to the Present

Chapter 20

Postwar Social Change

(1920–1929)


Objectives

OBJECTIVES

  • CORE OBJECTIVE: Explain the social, political, and economic impacts on the United States after World War I.

    • Objective 5.1: How did American society change after the war in terms of women’s roles and the demographics of cities?

    • Objective 5.2: How did mass media, jazz, and literature affect American life in the 1920’s?

    • Objective 5.3: Explain the cultural conflicts during the 1920’s relating to prohibition, religion, and racial tensions.

    • Objective 5.4: What events fueled the Red Scare in the early 1920’s?

    • Objective 5.5: How did Republican Presidential policies shape the economics of the decade?

    • Objective 5.6: How did industrial growth affect the economy of the 1920’s?

  • THEME:


Unit 4 chapter 20 postwar social change chapter 21 politics and prosperity

America: Pathways to the Present

Chapter 20: Postwar Social Change (1920–1929)

Section 1: Society in the 1920s

Section 2: Mass Media and the Jazz Age

Section 3: Cultural Conflicts


Chapter 20 section 3 cultural conflicts

Chapter 20 SECTION 3- CULTURAL CONFLICTS


Prohibition

Prohibition

  • The Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which took effect on January 16, 1920, made the manufacture, sale, and transport of liquor, beer, and wine illegal.

  • As a result, many Americans turned to bootleggers, or suppliers of illegal alcohol. Bars that operated illegally, known as speakeasies, were either disguised as legitimate businesses or hidden in some way, often behind heavy gates.


Prohibition1

PROHIBITION


Differences

DIFFERENCES?

  • A 1924 report showed that Kansans obeyed the law at a 95% rate and that New Yorkers obeyed the law at a rate of 5%


Organized crime

Organized Crime

  • The tremendous profit resulting from the sale of illegal liquor, as well as the complex organization involved, helped lead to the development of organized crime.

  • Successful bootlegging organizations often moved into other illegal activities as well, including gambling, prostitution, and racketeering.

    • As rival groups fought for control in some American cities, gang wars and murders became commonplace.

  • One of the most notorious criminals of this time was Al Capone, nicknamed “Scarface,” a gangster who rose to the top of Chicago’s organized crime network.

    • Capone proved talented at avoiding jail but was finally imprisoned in 1931.


Issues of religion

Fundamentalism

As science, technology, modern social issues, and new Biblical scholarship challenged traditional religious beliefs, a religious movement called fundamentalism gained popularity.

Fundamentalism supported traditional Christian ideas and argued for a literal interpretation of the Bible.

Billy Sunday and other famous fundamentalist preachers drew large audiences.

Evolution and the Scopes Trail

Fundamentalists worked to pass laws against teaching the theory of evolution in public schools.

A science teacher named John T. Scopes agreed to challenge such a law in Tennessee.

His arrest led to what was called the Scopes trial.

The Scopes trial became the first trial to be broadcast over American radio.

The Scopes Trial case became a public debate between religious fundamentalists and modern science (evolution).

Issues of Religion


Racial tensions

Red Summer

Mob violence between white and black Americans erupted in about 25 cities during the summer of 1919.

The worst of these race riots occurred in Chicago, where the African American population had doubled since 1910.

A white man threw a rock at a black teenager swimming in Lake Michigan, and the boy drowned.

The incident touched off riots that lasted several days, destroyed many homes, killed several people and wounded many more.

Revival of the Klan

Although it had been largely eliminated during Reconstruction, the Ku Klux Klan regained power during the 1920s and greatly increased its membership outside the South.

The Klan’s focus shifted to include terrorizing not just African Americans but also Catholics, Jews, immigrants, and others.

After the arrest of a major Klan leader in 1925, Klan membership diminished once again.

Racial Tensions


Marcus garvey

Marcus Garvey

  • During the 1920s, the NAACP fought for anti-lynching laws and worked to promote the voting rights of African Americans.

    • These efforts, however, met with limited success.

  • A movement led by Marcus Garvey, an immigrant from Jamaica, became popular with many African Americans. Garvey, who created the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), sought to build up African Americans’ self-respect and economic power, encouraging them to buy shares in his Negro Factories Corporation.

  • Garvey encouraged his followers to return to Africa and create a self-governing nation there.

    • Although corruption and mismanagement resulted in the collapse of the UNIA, Garvey’s ideas of racial pride and independence would affect future “black pride” movements.


Cultural conflicts assessment

Cultural Conflicts—Assessment

How did Prohibition reinforce the division between urban and rural areas?

(A)Speakeasies only replaced legal saloons in urban areas.

(B)Rural areas were more likely to obey Prohibition.

(C)Urban areas were more likely to obey Prohibition.

(D)Bootleggers only worked in rural areas.

Which of the following best describes Marcus Garvey’s goals for African Americans?

(A)Religious fundamentalism and an end to teaching evolution

(B)Equality with Catholics, Jews, and immigrants

(C)Universal suffrage and an end to lynchings

(D)Self-respect, economic power, and independence


Cultural conflicts assessment1

Cultural Conflicts—Assessment

How did Prohibition reinforce the division between urban and rural areas?

(A)Speakeasies only replaced legal saloons in urban areas.

(B)Rural areas were more likely to obey Prohibition.

(C)Urban areas were more likely to obey Prohibition.

(D)Bootleggers only worked in rural areas.

Which of the following best describes Marcus Garvey’s goals for African Americans?

(A)Religious fundamentalism and an end to teaching evolution

(B)Equality with Catholics, Jews, and immigrants

(C)Universal suffrage and an end to lynchings

(D)Self-respect, economic power, and independence


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