Seton hall university w ho are we
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 49

Seton Hall University W ho Are We? PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 87 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Seton Hall University W ho Are We?. We Are A Mid Sized, Private, Catholic Affiliated University in Central New Jersey Carnegie Classification: Research / Doctoral II Main Campus in South Orange, NJ 15 miles from New York City 10,000 Students 4,400 Full Time Undergraduates (50% Residential)

Download Presentation

Seton Hall University W ho Are We?

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Seton hall university w ho are we

Seton Hall UniversityWho Are We?

  • We Are A Mid Sized, Private, Catholic Affiliated University in Central New Jersey

    • Carnegie Classification: Research / Doctoral II

    • Main Campus in South Orange, NJ

      • 15 miles from New York City

    • 10,000 Students

      • 4,400 Full Time Undergraduates (50% Residential)

    • 350 FT Faculty (450 FTE Faculty)

    • FY’01 Annual Operating Budget Approx. $150 million

      • FY’00 G&E for South Orange Campus Approx. $115 million


Pace of change at seton hall university

Pace Of Change at Seton Hall University

  • Before 1995:

    • Inadequate Computer Labs

    • Inadequate Local Networks/E-mail

    • Lack of Integration of Technology in Teaching

    • Disorganized Support/Allocation of Resources


Pace of change cont

Pace Of Change (Cont.)

Now:

  • Seton Hall University is doing IT “right”

    • 2000 EDUCAUSE Award (Honorable Mention) for Systemic Progress in T&L with Technology

    • 1999 EDUCAUSE Award for Campus Networking Excellence

    • In Top 50 of Yahoo! Internet Life Survey of “Most Wired” Universities

    • Growing National Reputation of our Mobile Computing Initiative and other Teaching, Learning, and Technology Initiatives

    • Alliance with IBM Corporation

    • Site Visits by National/International Universities

    • Presentations at National Conferences/Workshop


A vehicle for change university strategic planning

A Vehicle for Change:University Strategic Planning

  • Seton Hall University has accomplished heightened recognition among top-tier Catholic Universities nationally

  • The strategic goals include a critical focus on the intellectual, personal and spiritual development of all students

  • Students experience a rigorous, value-centered and technologically enhanced environment


Advancing strategic goals with technology

Advancing Strategic Goals with Technology

  • To advance the strategic goals, a strong focus was placed on communication, teaching and learning as well as support services for students using technology

  • It was recommended that a strategic agenda include an Information Technology Strategic Planning process to build an IT Long-Range Plan


Seton hall university how did this happen

Seton Hall UniversityHow Did This Happen?

  • Began With Development of IT Plan in 1995

    • Part of the University’s Strategic Planning Process

    • Cross Functional Team

      • Included Faculty and Administrators

      • Given Half-Time Release to Work on IT Plan

      • Intensive Immersion in IT Issues, Trends, Directions

    • Executive Sponsorship/Commitment to Implement

      • Chief Academic Officer/Chief Financial Officer

    • Involvement of User Community

      • Focus Groups/Surveys

      • Involvement of Faculty and Administrator Constituency Groups(e.g., Academic Computing Advisory Committee, Administrative Computing User Groups, etc.)

    • Technology Planning Consultant from IBM Education


Seton hall university s strategic technology plan

Seton Hall University’sStrategic Technology Plan

  • Our Technology Strategy:

    • Seton Hall University will develop and implement a

      • learner-centered,

      • network-centered,

      • distributed (mobile) learning environment

    • The core of our distributed learning environment will be a robust set of digital information resources (e.g., a “digital library”) in support of teaching, learning, scholarship, and institutional transformation


Shu s strategic it plan

SHU’s Strategic IT Plan

  • Implications of the IT Plan:Focus on student experience

    • Students Want / Need:

      • Ubiquitous Access to Technology

      • University-wide Hardware and Software Standards

      • University-wide Network

      • Central IT Support Services

      • Greater Curricular Integration of Technology

      • More Efficient Business Processes / Greater Access to Institutional Information and Services / Bringing Together Academic and Administrative Computing


Implementing the strategy

Implementing the Strategy

  • In order to implement the strategy, the University undertook a number of teaching, learning, and technology initiatives:

    • Mobile (Ubiquitous) Computing Program

    • SetonWorldWide (Online Professional Programs)

    • Web-enabling Enrollment Services

    • Reorganization of Computing Services

      • Created New User Services Organization, Including a Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center

    • Major Technology Infrastructure Upgrade

      • Gigabit Ethernet Campus Backbone; Server Consolidation; Campus-wide Email System; 802.11b Wireless; Internet Upgrade; etc.


Mobile computing at seton hall university

Mobile Computing atSeton Hall University

  • Seton Hall University’s Mobile Computing Program is an innovative academic program involving three components:

    • Access:The University licenses the use of a laptop computer to all undergraduates as part of their tuition and fees

    • Curricular Integration:The University provides support and incentives to faculty to use technology in innovative ways to enhance teaching and learning

    • Network and Support Services:The University provides the infrastructure and support services that enable the effective use of technology in teaching and learning


Mobile computing cont

Mobile Computing (cont.)

  • Current Model:IBM ThinkPad R-series computer

    • 1.2 MHz PIII; 14” TFT Screen; 256 Mb RAM; 30 Gb HDD; CD-RW; Built-in 802.11b wireless networking; 10/100 Ethernet; 56Kb Modem; LiON Battery

    • Computer is replaced every two years

  • Current Technology Fee: $700 per semester for students in the program (“non mobile” students, e.g., many graduate students, pay a technology fee of $200 per semester)

  • Bundled software includes: MS Windows ME, MS Office 2000, SPSS, Maple V, various utilities

  • Bundled services include:

    • Technology Help Desk, PC Repairs, Loaner Computers

    • Network Services, including wireless network access from most academic and public spaces


Mobile computing cont1

Mobile Computing (cont.)

  • Program Phase-In

    • 1995 – 1997: Pilot Programs

      • Focus on Teaching and Learning

      • Based on cohorts with common academic experiences (e.g., Business Honors Program in 1995, expanded to all 1st Year Business, Biology, and Honors students in Fall 1997)

      • Began Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center and internal grant program to provide incentives to departments willing to integrate technology into large enrollment core courses


Mobile computing cont2

Mobile Computing (cont.)

  • Program Phase-In (cont.)

    • 1998 – 1999: Full Roll Out of Program

      • Program is Mandatory for ALL Incoming FT Undergraduates

      • Focus on Infrastructure

      • Major Network / Server Upgrades

        • Lotus Notes Email / Lotus LearningSpace Course Management System

        • MS FrontPage Enabled Web Servers for Faculty and Students

        • ATM Backbone / Campus Internet Upgrade /Server Consolidation / Y2K Preparation


Mobile computing cont3

Mobile Computing (cont.)

  • Program Phase-In (cont.)

    • 2000 – Present: Enterprise Perspective

      • Focus on Enterprise Systems

        • Implementation of Web services for students (e.g., online registration, course audit, grades, etc.)

        • Automation of Mobile Computing processes (e.g., asset management, account generation, etc.)

        • Implementation of BlackBoard course management / portal system; 24/7 support services through Eduprise

        • Campus-wide wireless networking / Campus network upgraded to gigabit Ethernet backbone


Mobile computing cont4

Mobile Computing (cont.)

  • Major investment on the part of the University

    • Central IT Budget (incl. laptop leases /student fees)for FY’02 approx. $15 million or 13% SO Campus G&E(10% of the total University budget)

      • Almost equally divided between personnel, operating, and Mobile Computing Program (technology fee) budgets

      • Most costs are operationalized / very little capital funding

  • Seton Hall University is a different place because of the University’s strategic initiatives (enrollments up, SAT’s up, new programs launched, etc.)

  • Mobile Computing Assessment Project indicates the program has had positive impact on learning / student recruitment


Charge of the mobile assessment team

Assess the impact of mobile computing on fall 1998 entering freshman

This includes student satisfaction with the learning environment and student learning outcomes

Charge of theMobile Assessment Team


Seton hall university w ho are we

Full Report and Resources

Available On-Line at:

http://tltc.shu.edu/initiatives/assessment/index.html

Key Researchers and Co-Authors

Eric Fountain, Ed.D.

John Collins, Ed.D.

Janet Easterling


Circles of assessment

Students

Institution

Faculty

External

Circles of Assessment


When assessment occurs

During

Make Changes in Process

After

Evaluate Experience

When Assessment Occurs

Before

Determine Needs


Examples of assessment topics

Examples of Assessment Topics

B

D

A


Types of assessment

Focus Groups

Interviews

Journals

Observations

Portfolios

Performances

Standardized Tests

Surveys

Tracking Systems

Longitudinal Records

Document Reviews

Skills Application Demonstrations

Types of Assessment


Narrowing the question

Narrowing the Question

Fantasy:

a + b = c

a = teaching, b = technology, c = learning

Reality:

a + b + c + d + e + f…

discipline, teaching style, technology proficiency, fit of application to task, desired learning objectives...


Faculty journals 1997

“Cognitive, behavioral and affective sides of transition”

“Technology has become a natural part of my teaching”

“Be prepared to punt”

“A year ago I couldn’t imagine using all this stuff: now I can.”

“Technology is only, alas, a dumb machine that is no more creative, inventive, or productive than the human using it”

Faculty Journals (1997)


Technology functions

Edit

Collaborate

Create

Compose

Automate

Visualize

Simulate

Communicate

Store

Structure Practice

Retrieve

Technology Functions


Seven principles chickering and gamson 1989

Seven Principles(Chickering and Gamson, 1989)

  • Contact between student and professor

  • Cooperation among students

  • Active learning

  • Prompt feedback

  • Time on Task

  • High Expectations

  • Respect diversity in talents and learning


Seton hall university w ho are we

Making Connections

Compelling Situation

Active search for meaning by learner

Developmental, cumulative process

Individual learners are social beings

Nature of Learning(AAHE, NASPA, 1998)

  • Strongly affected by educational climate

  • Rapid, rich, frequent feedback

  • Much is informal and incidental

  • Requires transfer of specific knowledge

  • Ability of learner to monitor own learning


Seton hall university w ho are we

Evaluation of General Satisfaction, Technology Use, and Student Perceptions of the Impact of Mobile Computing on the Learning Environment at Seton Hall UniversitySpring 1998 – Fall 2000


Independent variables

Independent Variables

Gender

R1a. Does a student’s gender have an effect on their perceptions regarding the satisfaction of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R2a. Does a student’s gender have an effect on their perceptions regarding the use of computers in the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R3a. Does a student’s gender have an effect on their perceptions regarding the desired outcomes of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?


Independent variables1

Independent Variables

Housing Status

R1b. Does a student’s housing status have an effect on their perceptions regarding satisfaction of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R2b. Does a student’s housing status have an effect on their perceptions regarding the use of computers in the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R3b. Does a student’s housing status have an effect on their perceptions regarding the desired outcomes of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?


Independent variables2

Independent Variables

Ethnicity

R1c. Does a student’s ethnic affiliation have an effect on their perceptions regarding satisfaction of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R2c. Does a student’s ethnic affiliation have an effect on their perceptions regarding the use of computers in the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R3c. Does a student’s ethnic affiliation have an effect on their perceptions regarding the desired outcomes of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?


Limitations

Limitations

  • Structural

    • Use of Mobile vs. Non-Mobile Construct

    • Neutral Category

  • Administrative

    • Sampling

    • Change from paper to online.


Results

RESULTS


Response rates

Response Rates

Term

Target Popn:

#FR

Survey Responses

#FR

(FR Resp.Rate)

Target

Popn:

#Non-FR/U(returning students)

Survey Responses

#Non-FR/U

(Non-FR/U Resp. Rate)

Target Popn: Comb. Total

Survey Responses

(Comb. Resp.Rate)

Fall 1998

1226

324 (26%)

365

(20+20+325)

90 (25%)

1591

414 (26%)

Spring

1999

1226

216 (18%)

365

(20+20+325)

124 (34%)

1591

340 (27%)

Fall 1999

1070

311 (29%)

1591

(365+1226)

453 (28%)

2661

764 (29%)

Spring 2000

1070

179 (17%)

1591

(365+1226)

18 (01%)

2661

197 ( 7%)

Fall 2000

1125

235 (21%)

2661(1591+1070)

476 (18%)

3786

711 (19%)

Totals – Fall TermsOnlyAll 5 Terms

3421

870 (25%)

4617

1019 (22%)

12,290

2,426 (20%)


Response demographics

Response Demographics


Top five responses satisfaction

Top Five Responses – Satisfaction

68.4

63.9

56.1

55.5

53.2


Top five responses technology use

Top Five Responses – Technology Use


Top five responses outcomes

Top Five Responses – Outcomes


Examining the research questions

Examining the Research Questions


Gender

Gender

R1a. Does a student’s gender have an effect on their perceptions regarding the satisfaction of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R2a. Does a student’s gender have an effect on their perceptions regarding the use of computers in the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R3a. Does a student’s gender have an effect on their perceptions regarding the desired outcomes of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?


Gender1

Gender


Housing status

Housing Status

R1b. Does a student’s housing status have an effect on their perceptions regarding satisfaction of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R2b. Does a student’s housing status have an effect on their perceptions regarding the use of computers in the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R3b. Does a student’s housing status have an effect on their perceptions regarding the desired outcomes of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?


Housing status1

Housing Status


Ethnicity

Ethnicity

R1c. Does a student’s ethnic affiliation have an effect on their perceptions regarding satisfaction of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R2c. Does a student’s ethnic affiliation have an effect on their perceptions regarding the use of computers in the SHU Mobile Computing Program?

R3c. Does a student’s ethnic affiliation have an effect on their perceptions regarding the desired outcomes of the SHU Mobile Computing Program?


Ethnicity1

Ethnicity


Conclusions

Conclusions

The typical Seton Hall University student, whether representing all respondents, or particular groups of students (groups identified by gender, race/ethnicity, and residence status), is generally:

  • Attracted to Seton Hall University by the availability of technology at the University and the infusion of technology in the curriculum, as suggested by student reported positive influences on the decision to attend the University,

  • Satisfied with the Mobile Computing Program as well as with the laptop and support services once enrolled at the University,

  • Making good use of the technology available to all students, at least in terms of certain types of technology use, and.

  • Perceiving a substantive positive impact of Seton Hall University’s Mobile Computing Program on the learning environment.


Strategic academic technology initiatives

Strategic Academic Technology Initiatives

  • Other initiatives have been developed in addition to the Mobile Computing project. Through Academic Affairs and Information Technology Strategic Planning as well as an active Teaching, Learning and Technology Roundtable, current projects/initiatives include:

    • ePortfolio Pilot Projects

    • Curricular Development Initiatives such as "Writing Across the Curriculum“ and Large Course Redesign Projects in English and Psychology

    • Faculty Best Practices Showcases


Sesquicentennial plan

Sesquicentennial Plan

  • Seton Hall University is currently undergoing a Strategic Planning process in preparation for a Sesquicentennial Strategic Agenda as we approach our 150th Anniversary. Importantly, this agenda will include the formation of a distinctive educational experience supported by technology rich resources.


Questions

Questions?


  • Login