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Phyllis W. Cheng, Director State of California Department of Fair Employment & Housing. Program Number 113 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act w here are we now ?. Introduction. History of the Civil Rights Act. General impact.

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Phyllis w cheng director state of california department of fair employment housing

Phyllis W. Cheng, Director

State of California

Department of Fair Employment & Housing

Program Number 113

50th Anniversary

of the 1964 Civil Rights Act

where are we now?


Introduction
Introduction

History of the Civil Rights Act.

General impact.

Titles and Achievements under the Civil Rights Act.



History

  • The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was signed into law on July 2, 1964, by President Lyndon B. Johnson.

  • Barred discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

History


General impact

The Civil Rights Act spurred many changes in:

  • Education;

  • Employment;

  • Public accommodations;

  • Voting rights.

General Impact


Title i

Title I:


Title ii

Prohibits all races. public accommodations discrimination by

  • Hotels;

  • Motels;

  • Restaurants;

  • Theaters; and

  • All other public accommodations engaged in interstate commerce.

  • Private clubs are exempted.

    .

Title II:


Title iii

Bars all races. state and municipal governments from denying access to public facilities.

Title III:


Title iv

  • Encourages public school all races. desegregation; and

  • Authorized enforcement by the U.S. Attorney General.

  • http://www.justice.gov/crt/about/edu/types.php

Title IV:


Title v

Expands the mission of the Civil Rights Commission with additional powers, rules and procedures that were originally established by the earlier Civil Rights Act of 1957.

Title V:




Title viii

Requires compilation of voter-registration and voting data in geographic areas identified by the Commission on Civil Rights.

Title VIII:


Title ix

Allows civil rights cases to be removed from state courts to federal court to overcome segregationist judges and all-white juries.

Title IX:


Title x

Established the Community Relations Service, which assists in community disputes involving claims of discrimination.

Title X:


Title xi

Provides a right to jury trial for a defendant accused of title II, III, IV, V, VI, or VII categories of criminal contempt. The defendant can be fined up to $1,000 or imprisoned for up to six months.

Title XI:


Significa nt us supreme court cases

See list and summary at: title II, III, IV, V, VI, or VII categories of criminal contempt. The defendant can be fined up to $1,000 or imprisoned for up to six months.

http://www.civilrights.org/judiciary/supreme-court/key-cases.html

Significant US Supreme Court Cases


A great legacy
A Great Legacy title II, III, IV, V, VI, or VII categories of criminal contempt. The defendant can be fined up to $1,000 or imprisoned for up to six months.


Thank you title II, III, IV, V, VI, or VII categories of criminal contempt. The defendant can be fined up to $1,000 or imprisoned for up to six months.

www.dfeh.ca.gov

[email protected]

[email protected]

(800) 884-1684

Videophone (916) 226-5285


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