Lesson 6: The General Argument for Christianity

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Lesson 6: The General Argument for Christianity

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1. Lesson 6: The General Argument for Christianity

2. Figure 6-1

3. Figure 6-2

4. Figure 6-3

5. Figure 6-5

6. Is the Bible the Word of God and Jesus the Only Way to Heaven?

7. Premise A: The New Testament is historically accurate; it is a reliable and trustworthy document.

8. Premise B: On the basis of this reliable document, we have sufficient evidence to believe that Jesus rose from the dead as He predicted He would, and that He fulfilled dozens of other Messianic prophecies.

9. Premise C: Jesus’ resurrection and fulfillment of prophecy show that He was who He said He was: the Messiah, the Son of God—God in the flesh.

10. Premise D: Because Jesus is God, He is infallible—What He says is absolutely trustworthy.

11. Premise E: Jesus Christ taught that the Bible is the Word of God (Matt. 5:18, 15:4; Mark 12:36; Luke 24:44–46). He also taught that He is the only way to God (John 14:6).

12. Conclusion: If Christ said it, we must believe it—The Bible is the Word of God, and Jesus is the only way to God. Therefore Christianity is true.

13. Figure 6-5

14. Application of Lesson: This week, find an unbeliever who will let you share with him the general argument for Christianity. Draw the blocks on paper, write in the premises, and verbally make the logical connections as you present the argument. If he says he believes something different, ask questions such as: What evidence do you have for that? Where did you learn that? What happens if you’re wrong?

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