Maths information evening
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 37

Maths Information Evening PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 149 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Maths Information Evening. Tuesday 6 th November 2012. Outline of the Evening. Teaching methods for the 4 operations Ways to help your child at home Maths vocabulary Useful websites. Addition. Stage 1: The empty number line 

Download Presentation

Maths Information Evening

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Maths information evening

Maths Information Evening

Tuesday 6th November 2012


Outline of the evening

Outline of the Evening

  • Teaching methods for the 4 operations

  • Ways to help your child at home

  • Maths vocabulary

  • Useful websites


Addition

Addition

Stage 1: The empty number line 

  • The empty number line helps to record the steps on the way to calculating the total.

  • 48 + 36 = 84  


Stage 2 partitioning

Stage 2: Partitioning

  • The next stage is to record mental methods using partitioning. Add the tens and then the ones to form partial sums and then add these partial sums. 

    Record steps in addition using partitioning:

    47 + 76 = 40 + 7 + 70 + 6

    Rearrange the sum:

    40 + 70 + 7 + 6 = 110 + 13 = 123


Stage 3 expanded method in columns

Stage 3: Expanded method in columns

  • Move on to a layout showing the addition of the tens to the tens and the ones to the ones.


Stage 4 column method

4

7

+

7

6

1

2

3

1

Stage 4: Column method

  • In this method, recording is reduced further. Carry digits are recorded below the line.


Subtraction

Subtraction

  • Stage 1: Using the empty number line The empty number line helps to record or explain the steps in mental subtraction. A calculation like 74 – 27 can be recorded by counting back 27 from 74 to reach 47.


The counting up method

The counting-up method

  • The mental method of counting up from the smaller to the larger number can be recorded using number. 74 – 27 = 47


Stage 2 partitioning1

Stage 2: Partitioning

  • Subtraction can be recorded using partitioning:

  • 74 – 27 = 74 – 20 = 54 

    54 – 7 =  47  


Stage 3 expanded layout leading to column method

Stage 3: Expanded layout, leading to column method

Example: 98 – 36 Example: 74 - 27

90 + 8 98

- 30 + 636

60 + 2 62


Stage 4 column subtraction

Stage 4: Column Subtraction

Recording is reduced further. When decomposition is necessary the altered numbers are shown above the actual numbers.

Example: 74 – 27

6 1

7 4

- 2 7

4 7


Multiplication

Multiplication

  • Stage 1: Mental multiplication using partitioning

    14 x 3 = (10 + 4) x 3

    = (10 x 3) + ( 4 x 3) = 30 + 12 = 42  

    43 x 6 = (40 + 3) x 6

    = (40 x 6) + (3 x 6) = 240 + 18 = 258  


Stage 2 the grid method

Stage 2: The grid method

  • An expanded method which uses a grid can be used. It is an alternative way of recording the same steps e.g. 38 x 7 =


Stage 3 expanded short multiplication

Stage 3: Expanded short multiplication

  • The next step is to represent the method of recording in a column format, but showing the working. Draw attention to the links with the grid method.

    38

    X 7

    56

    210

    266


Stage 4 short multiplication

Stage 4: Short Multiplication

  • The recording is reduced further, with carry digits recorded below the line.

  • If, after practice, children cannot use the compact method without making errors, they should return to the expanded format of stage 3.


Stage 5 two digit by two digit grid method t u x t u

Stage 5: Two digit by two digit - Grid Method T U X T U

Extend to TU × TU asking children to estimate first. Start with the grid method.


Stage 5 two digit by two digit products

Stage 5: Two-digit by two-digit products

Reduce the recording, showing the links to the grid method. (Some children may need this step)

56 × 27 is approximately 60 × 30 = 1800.

56

X 27

42 6 x 7

350 50 x 7

120 6 x 20

1000 50 x 20

1512

1


Stage 5 long multiplication

Stage 5: Long Multiplication

  • Move onto formal written methods of multiplication.

    56

    4X 27

    1 392

    1120

    1512

    1

56 x 7

56 x 20


Stage 6 three digit by two digit products

Stage 6: Three-digit by two-digit products

  • Extend to HTU × TU asking children to estimate first. Start with the grid method.

  • 286 × 29 is approximately 300 × 30 = 9000.


Stage 6 three digit by two digit products1

Stage 6: Three-digit by two-digit products

  • Children who are already secure with multiplication for TU × U and TU × TU should have little difficulty in using the same method for HTU × TU.

  • Again, the carry digits in the partial products are usually carried mentally.

  • 286

  • x 29

  • 2574 286 x 9

  • 5720286 x 20

  • 8294

  • 1


Division

Division

  • Stage 1: Mental division using partitioning e.g. 84 ÷ 7 =


Stage 2 short division of tu u

Stage 2: Short division of TU ÷ U

81 ÷ 3 = (60 + 21) ÷ 3 = (60 ÷ 3) + ( 21 ÷ 3)

= 20 + 7 = 27


Stage 3 expanded method for htu u

Stage 3: ‘Expanded’ method for HTU ÷ U

  • This method is often referred to as ‘chunking’.


Stage 4 short division of htu u

Stage 4: Short division of HTU ÷ U


Stage 5 long division

Stage 5: Long division

The next step is to tackle HTU ÷ TU, which for most children will be in Year 6.

20 x 24

3 x 24


Helping at home

Helping at Home

  • A major key to success in maths at KS2 is to learn times tables.

  • This can be made fun in lots of different ways and there are lots of good resources available on the market to help, for example books, posters and CDs.


Maths problems

Maths Problems

  • Not all the maths that we do in school is about calculations. The maths curriculum has a wide variety of topic areas in which the children acquire knowledge which will help them in every day life.

  • There are many ways that you can help your child to learn at home by asking them questions and doing practical activities in the following areas;


Maths problems1

Maths Problems

  • Measures (weight, length, capacity)

  • Money

  • Time

  • Fractions, decimals, percentages


Measures weight

Measures – Weight

  • Any practical use of weighing objects and using scales. This could be linked to making a recipe for 4 people and ask what quantities would be needed to make the recipe for 8 or 2 people?

  • Estimate the mass of this bag of carrots. Weigh the bag to see how close you are.

  • A sack of rice weighs 5 kg. How many grams is this?

  • Weigh this apple to the nearest 10 grams. Approximately how many apples of a similar size together would weigh 1kg? How did you get your answer?

  • Three parcels weigh 785g, 55g and 0.25kg. How much do they weigh altogether?


Measures length

Measures – Length

  • What would you measure using a ruler? a tape measure? a surveyor's tape? trundle wheel? Have a go at measuring the length of things.

  • A bench is 2 metres and 40 centimetres long. How many centimetres is this? Explain how you worked this out.

  • Which of these measurements is equivalent to 2.07 metres: 270cm, 2007cm, 207cm or 270cm? How did you know?

  • Draw these lines accurately using a 300mm ruler marked in cm: 5.2cm 0.7cm 83mm 7mm


Measures capacity

Measures – Capacity

  • Suggest some objects whose capacity could be measured using a 1 litre measuring jug.

  • Test suggestions and discuss accuracy.

  • Choose the correct answer. A drinking glass holds about...0.2litres,  2litres,  20litres, 200 litres?

  • Which measurement is equivalent to 1.3 litres: 130ml, 1003ml, 1300ml or 103ml?How do you know?


Money

Money

  • Using shopping as a way to help children calculate costs of several items and how much change they will get. When sales are on, calculate how much they will get off etc. Link to percentages and decimals.

  • If Ella buys one toy costing 35p and another costing 48p. She pays with a £5 note. How much change does she get?

  • Parveen buys 3 small bags of peanuts. She gives the shop keeper £2 and gets 80p change. What is the cost in pence of one bag of peanuts?

  • 185 people go to the school concert.They pay £1.35 each.How much ticket money is collected?


Maths information evening

Time

  • How would a digital clock show the time twenty minutes to six ?

  • The car journey to work takes Rob 20 minutes. He needs to be at work at 9 O'Clock. What time should he set off to work?

  • How would quarter past four in the afternoon be shown on a 24-hour digital clock?

  • A plane takes off on Tuesday at 22:47. It lands on Wednesday at 07:05. How long in hours and minutes is the flight?

  • Use calendars, timetables, digital and analogue clocks to create problems for your children to solve.


Fractions decimals percentages

Fractions, decimals, percentages

  • I ate more than half a pizza but less than three quarters. What fraction could I have eaten?

  • What would you prefer: 3 pizzas shared between 4 people or 6 pizzas shared between 10 people? Explain why.

  • Which of these decimals means 7/10?

    a. 70, b. 7, c. 0.7, d. 0.07.

  • What fractions is the same as nought point four?

  • What percentage of £8 is £2?What percentage of £100 is £20?


Games

Games

  • A key to success in maths is to make it fun and entertaining for the children. This can involve playing maths games or using interactive maths resources which are available on the internet.


Mathematical language

Mathematical Language

  • The language used in maths can be quite confusing for children for example, the words product, sum and factor have meanings which are nothing to do with maths.

  • Try to talk to your child at home about what they have been learning in maths and if possible question them about their understanding of the language.

  • A children’s maths dictionary is a useful tool.


Useful websites

Useful websites

  • www.samlearning.com

  • www.amathsdictionaryforkids.com

  • www.coolmath4kids.com

  • www.bbc.co.uk/schools/websites/4_11/site/numeracy

  • www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/maths

  • www.sumdog.com

  • www.mymaths.co.uk


  • Login