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Facing Facts 2008 Public Forum. Santee-Lynches Regional COG Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009. Adult Population. Educational Attainment and Earnings Potential. Average Educational Career annual earnings attainment earnings (40 years)

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Facing facts 2008 public forum l.jpg

Facing Facts 2008Public Forum

Santee-Lynches Regional COG

Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009



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Educational Attainment and Earnings Potential

Average Educational Career

annual earningsattainmentearnings (40 years)

$16,121/yr No High School Diploma / GED $644,840

Oct. ‘09 U.S. Unemployment Rate: 15.5%

$24,572/yr High School Diploma / GED $982,880

$32,152/yr Associate Degree $1,286,080

Oct. ‘09 U.S. Unemployment Rate: 9.0%

$45,678/yr Bachelor Degree $1,827,120

$55,641/yr Master Degree $2,225,640

$86,833/yr Doctorate Degree $3,473,320

Source: U.S. Census 2000


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Impact of More Education / Postsecondary

(Data available for Sumter, Kershaw & Clarendon counties)

Educational Median annual Total Annual aggregate

attainment* personal earnings (+) Adults (25+) earnings (+)

Current $26,971 126,579 $3,413,962,859

Good gains (2%) $27,414 (+$443) 126,579 $3,470,084,678 (+$56M)

Great gains (4%) $27,797 (+$826) 126,579 $3,518,458,920 (+$105M)

  • Educational attainment is the composition of adults 25-and-older in 4 categories:

  • Less Than a High School Diploma/GED, only a High School Diploma/GED,

  • Some college or Associate Degree only, and Bachelor Degree or more.

Source: United Way of America, Common Good Forecaster, 2007 data


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Public high school graduation rates and post-secondary rates in region

About 70% of 8th graders are graduating high school

with a diploma

over time

in region.

Almost 50% of 8th graders

are entering

post-secondary education

directly after

high school

8th graders

  • Current region graduation rate average of an estimated 70% is about equal to state average.(U.S. average is about 75% in recent years.)

  • Percentage of region’s students entering post-secondary directly after high school (estimated nearly 50%) is a few percent below the state average.

Source: S.C. Department of Education enrollment and diploma data for high school graduating cohorts of 2004-’05 through 2007-’08


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Source: U.S. Census Bureau

* Lee total is Census 2000


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Source: U.S. Census Bureau

* Lee total is Census 2000



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Source: S.C. Department of Education, 2008 PACT English scores, 6th-8th graders meeting standards


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Public high school graduation rates scores, 6and post-secondary rates in region

About 70% of 8th graders are graduating high school

with a diploma

over time

in region.

Almost 50% of 8th graders

are entering

post-secondary education

directly after

high school

8th graders

  • Current region graduation rate average of an estimated 70% is about equal to state average.(U.S. average is about 75% in recent years.)

  • Percentage of region’s students entering post-secondary directly after high school (estimated nearly 50%) is a few percent below the state average.

Source: S.C. Department of Education enrollment and diploma data for high school graduating cohorts of 2004-’05 through 2007-’08


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Source: S.C. Department of Education 8 scores, 6th and 12th grade enrollment data by cohort for graduating classes of 2002-’03, 2003-’04, and 2006-’07.



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Early-Early Childhood scores, 6Education

0-3 years


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Human Brain Development scores, 6Synapse Formation Dependent on Early Experiences

Language

Higher Cognitive Function

Sensory Pathways

(Vision, Hearing)

FIRST YEAR

-8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Birth

(Months)

(Years)

Source: C. Nelson (2000)


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Literacy – scores, 6

Early Vocabulary Growth

1200

College-educated

parents

Working-class

parents

Cumulative Vocabulary

600

Welfare parents

0

12

16

20

24

28

32

36

Age - Months

B. Hart & T. Risley, Meaningful Differences in Everyday

Experiences of Young American Children, 1995


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Socio-economic class differences scores, 6in children’s intellectual growth

TopicCollege-educated Working- Welfare

parentsclass parentsparents

Vocabulary at age 3 1,116 words 749 words 525 words

Average I.Q. at age 3 117 107 79

Parental “utterances”

per hour at age 3 487 301 176

Total encouragements/

discouragements

heard by age 3 498,000/78,000 186,000/108,000 78,000/171,000

(6-to-1) (2-to-1) (1-to-2)

Summary: Children’s language exposure that includes more affirmations and complex sentences correlates strongly with I.Q. and academic success later on in life.

Source: Hart and Risley, Meaningful differences in the everyday experiences of young American children, 1995


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Socio-economic class differences scores, 6in children’s intellectual growth

“Taken together, the conclusions of these researchers (Hart & Risley, Brooks-Gunn, Farah, and Lareau) suggests that the disadvantages that poverty imposes on children aren’t primarily about material goods. True, every poor child would benefit from having more books in his home and more nutritious food to eat. But thereal advantages that middle-class children gain come from more elusive processes: the language that their parents use, the attitudes toward life that they convey.”

Source: Paul Tough, The New York Times Magazine, 2006


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Risk factors contributing to readiness gaps scores, 6

#1 Disability:Primarily speech and language disorders, but also mental, emotional, vision, hearing and learning disabilities. (Cause: Mostly Genetic, Partly Environmental)

#2 Emotional/Behavioral Problems:Lack all the following on standardized measurement in Kindergarten: Self-control, social problem-solving, interaction with others, and self-concept. (Cause: Mostly Environmental, Partly Genetic)

#3 Low Literacy Skills:Low vocabulary, language skills and literacy experiences developed primarily at home with family. A direct result generally of a mother without a diploma/GED.

(Cause: All environmental)

#4 Poor:On Free Lunch (under 130% of poverty)

Source: S.C. Kids Count 2009


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For every scores, 610 kids in S.C.

Number in Top-3 risk factors

(Disability, Emotional/Behavioral Problems, Low Literacy Skills)

Number not having Top-3 risk factors

(Disability, Emotional/Behavioral Problems, Low Literacy Skills)

4

2.1

1.3

6

1.3

0.5

Below Basic

in 5th Grade

on PACT

Below Basic

in 5th Grade

on PACT

Far Below Basic

in 5th Grade on PACT

Far Below Basic

in 5th Grade on PACT

Source: S.C. Kids Count 2009


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S.C. Dept. of Juvenile Justice Juvenile Profile scores, 6

950 juveniles in residence

At Admission

  • Teenage juveniles’ assessed reading and math skills are generally at least three grade levels behind their peers. Many qualify for special education classes.

  • DJJ School District operates 12 months a year offering middle school and high school programs to educate juveniles.

Source: S.C. Department of Juvenile Justice


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S.C. Dept. of Corrections Inmate Profile scores, 6

24,462 inmates – June 30, 2009

At Admission (Intake)

  • Average is 8.5 grade reading level (assessment)

  • 53% read at less than 9th grade level (assessment)

  • 58% don’t have a high school diploma or GED (self-reported)

  • 10.5 grade is average educational achievement level (self-reported)

    Source: S.C. Department of Corrections


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WEIGHING THE COSTS scores, 6INCARCERATION - VERSUS - EDUCATION

1 Student

educated

in state

$25.39/day

$9,268/year

1 Adult Inmate 1 Juvenile 1 Student

incarcerated incarcerated

in state in state In State

$44.98/day $300/day $22.35/day

$16,462/year $109,500/year $8,159/year

THE DIFFERENCES

Adult Inmate/StudentJuvenile/Student

Cost per day nearly double Cost per day more than

(1.77 times as expensive) 11 times as expensive

Sources: Fiscal 2008 current operational expenses from S.C. Department of Corrections, S.C. Department of Juvenile Justice, and S.C. Department of Education


Facing facts 2008 reports and tonight s presentation are available for download on our cog web site l.jpg
Facing Facts 2008 Reports and Tonight’s Presentation are Available for Download on ourCOG Web site:

www.santeelynchescog.org


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