slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
OBJECTIVES

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 47

DC200B Chapter 10 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 98 Views
  • Uploaded on

OBJECTIVES. 1. Characterize the various stages leading to the production of finished blueprints. 2. Differentiate between an architectural schematic drawing and a set of preliminary drawings. 3. Establish why a cover sheet is such an important document.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'DC200B Chapter 10' - daniel_millan


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
objectives
OBJECTIVES

1. Characterize the various stages leading to the production of finished blueprints.

2. Differentiate between an architectural schematic drawing and a set of preliminary drawings.

3. Establish why a cover sheet is such an important document.

4. Identify the items of information that would normally appear in the title block.

5. Describe the various types of lines and symbols that are typically found on an architectural drawing.

6. Specify the importance of including building material symbols on a drawing.

7. Explain how topographic symbols help the contractor.

8. Contrast the main differences between an architect’s scale and an engineer’s scale.

9. Clarify the necessity for working drawings to include a detailed set of specifications.

slide3

Various drawing types include:

Architectural drawings, which show a layout of the proposed project’s floor plans, elevations, and details.

Structural drawings, which characterize how various load-carrying systems will be built.

Mechanical/Electrical drawings, which show the physical plant of the structure, such as lighting, power, plumbing, fire protection, and HVAC.

slide4

Various drawing types include: (continued)

Site drawings, which depict the relationship between the structure and the property it will occupy, including various site improvements, such as sanitary systems, utilities, and so on.

slide7

The title block should include the following information:

The sheet or drawing number, identifying the group and order to which it belongs.

The drawing name or title, such as “Second Floor Plan”.

The date of completion of the drawing.

The initials of the draftsperson.

Any revisions to the final set of drawings.

slide12

The most commonly encountered line types in architectural drawings are:

Main Object Lines, which define the outline of the structure, or object. They are thick, unbroken lines that show the main outlines of the walls, floors, elevations, details, or sections.

Dimension Lines, which provide the lengths of the main object lines. They are very light lines with triangles, resembling arrowheads, on each end. The number that appears in the center break of the dimension line represents the measurement of the specific main object line to which it refers.

slide13

The most commonly encountered line types in architectural drawings are: (continued)

Extension Lines, which are used together with dimension lines, and are the light lines that extend beyond the main object lines. The arrowheads of the dimension lines usually reach and touch the extension lines.

Hidden Lines, which are light dashes that indicate the outlines of an object normally hidden from view, either under or behind some other part of the structure. The dashes used in this line type are usually of equal length.

slide14

The most commonly encountered line types in architectural drawings are: (continued)

Center Lines, which are light lines with alternating long/short dashes, indicating the center of an object, and frequently labeled with the letter C superimposed over the letter L.

slide22

The three-sided version of the architect’s scale has ten separate scales, paired in five groups of two:

1/8-inch and 1/4-inch

1-inch and 1/2-inch

3/4-inch and 3/8-inch

3/16-inch and 3/32-inch

1 and 1/2-inch and 3-inch

slide32

LAB 26 OBJECTIVE

Identifying Blueprint Symbols

To understand how to identify standard blueprinting symbols

slide34

TIP

Notice that the conceptual plan includes several different buildings separated by two crossing streets. You can be assured that the master set of blueprints will include detailed drawings for each of the buildings shown, in addition to the building-to-building cabling specification being used.

slide35

TIP

Notice that Figure 10-11 is a miniature version of the industry standard blueprint that you just unfolded. It may be necessary to place objects on the corners of the industry standard blueprint to keep it flat.

lab 26 questions
LAB 26 QUESTIONS

Do all of the symbols shown in the blueprint relate to cable installations?

1

lab 26 questions1
LAB 26 QUESTIONS

Why could the architectural abbreviation MC possibly be confusing?

2

lab 26 questions2
LAB 26 QUESTIONS

List the different types of lines that may occur on an architectural drawing, and indicate which ones existed on the blueprint you used for this lab procedure.

3

review questions
REVIEW QUESTIONS

What are the various types of working drawings?

1

review questions1
REVIEW QUESTIONS

What do the numbers that appear in the center break of a dimension line represent?

2

review questions2
REVIEW QUESTIONS

Why are topographic symbols important to a communications contractor?

3

review questions3
REVIEW QUESTIONS

How do architectural drawings relate to the actual size of the structure they represent?

4

review questions4
REVIEW QUESTIONS

Which document takes precedence in cases where a contradiction between the blue-print and the specifications exists?

5

review questions5
REVIEW QUESTIONS

What constitutes the main difference between the architect’s scale and the engineer’s scale?

6

review questions6
REVIEW QUESTIONS

What is the primary use for a revision marker?

7

review questions7
REVIEW QUESTIONS

Where is a title block usually located on an architectural drawing?

8

ad