Appreciative inquiry
Download
1 / 43

appreciative inquiry - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 429 Views
  • Updated On :

Appreciative Inquiry. An Introduction. What is Appreciative Inquiry?. Appreciative Inquiry. A Positive Revolution in Change. The Birth of Appreciative Inquiry. David Cooperrider & Suresh Srivastva in 1987 With colleagues from Case Western University & Taos Institute. Appreciative Inquiry.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'appreciative inquiry' - daniel_millan


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Appreciative inquiry l.jpg

Appreciative Inquiry

An Introduction


What is appreciative inquiry l.jpg
What isAppreciativeInquiry?


Appreciative inquiry3 l.jpg
Appreciative Inquiry

A Positive Revolution in Change


The birth of appreciative inquiry l.jpg
The Birth of Appreciative Inquiry

  • David Cooperrider & Suresh Srivastva in 1987

  • With colleagues from Case Western University & Taos Institute


Appreciative inquiry5 l.jpg
Appreciative Inquiry

  • Systems Theory

  • Organisational Development

  • Asset-based community development

  • Solution-focused therapy

  • Narrative therapy

  • The “magic question”

  • Resilience


Words are tools l.jpg
Words AreTools

To a hammer

everything

is a nail!


Ap pre ci ate verb l.jpg
Ap-pre’ci-ate (verb)

  • valuing; the act of recognizing the best in people or the world around us; affirming past and present strengths, successes, and potentials; to perceive those things that give life (health, vitality, excellence) to living systems

  • to increase in value, e.g. the economy has appreciated in value

    Synonyms: valuing, prizing, esteeming and honouring


In quire kwir verb l.jpg
In-quire’ (kwir) (verb)

  • the act of exploration and discovery

  • to ask questions; to be open to seeing new potentials and possibilities

    Synonyms: discovery, search, systematic exploration and study


Appreciative inquiry9 l.jpg
Appreciative Inquiry

  • “No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it. We must learn to see the world anew.”

    (Albert Einstein)


What is appreciative inquiry used for l.jpg
What Is Appreciative Inquiry Used For?

  • Consult with people

  • Learn from past experience

  • Involve whole organisation or community in change

  • Build a vision for the future that everyone can share and help put into practice


What is appreciative inquiry used for11 l.jpg
What Is Appreciative Inquiry Used For?

  • Strategic Planning

  • School Improvement

  • Action Research

  • Evaluation

  • Mentoring & Performance Management

  • Leadership Training

  • Community Development

  • Business Excellence

  • Customer Service / Client Satisfaction

  • Culture Change & Transformation


Where is appreciative inquiry used l.jpg
Where is Appreciative Inquiry Used?

Global:

  • United States

  • Canada

  • United Kingdom

  • Europe

  • Australia

  • New Zealand

  • Africa

  • Asia


6 principles of appreciative inquiry l.jpg
6 Principles of Appreciative Inquiry

  • Descriptive or Constructionist Principle

  • Simultaneous Principle

  • Poetic Principle

  • Anticipatory Principle

  • Positive Principle

  • Wholeness Principle


8 assumptions of appreciative inquiry l.jpg
8 Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry

In every human situation something works

From: The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry, by Sue Annis Hammond


8 assumptions of appreciative inquiry15 l.jpg
8 Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry

What we focus on becomes our reality

From: The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry, by Sue Annis Hammond


8 assumptions of appreciative inquiry16 l.jpg
8 Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry

Reality is created in the moment and there are multiple realities

From: The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry, by Sue Annis Hammond


8 assumptions of appreciative inquiry17 l.jpg
8 Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry

The language we use shapes our reality

From: The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry, by Sue Annis Hammond


8 assumptions of appreciative inquiry18 l.jpg
8 Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry

The act of asking questions influences the outcome in some way

From: The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry, by Sue Annis Hammond


8 assumptions of appreciative inquiry19 l.jpg
8 Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry

People have more confidence going into the future (unknown) when they carry forward parts of the present (known)

From: The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry, by Sue Annis Hammond


8 assumptions of appreciative inquiry20 l.jpg
8 Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry

If we carry parts of the past into the future, they should be what are best about the past

From: The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry, by Sue Annis Hammond


8 assumptions of appreciative inquiry21 l.jpg
8 Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry

It is important to value differences

From: The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry, by Sue Annis Hammond


Positive action l.jpg

Positive Image

Positive Action

Six main areas of research:

  • Powerful placebo

  • Pygmalion effect

  • Positive affect & learned helpfulness

  • Imbalanced inner dialogue (2:1)

  • Positive imagery as a dynamic force

  • Affirmative capability


Slide23 l.jpg

“Felt need” & identification of problem

Analysis of causes

Analysis of possible solutions

Action planning

Assumes: Organisation is a problem to be solved

Back Door – what’s in the way of what we want?

Deficit Thinking

Appreciate & value the best of What Is

Envision: What Might Be

Dialogue: What Should Be

Innovate: What Will Be

Assumes: Organisation is mystery to be discovered

Front Door – what is it we ultimately want?

Possibility Thinking

Problem

Solving

Appreciative

Inquiry

AND


Deficit focus consequences l.jpg
Deficit Focus: Consequences

  • Fragmentation

  • Few new images of possibility

  • Negative frames are self-fulfilling

  • Visionless voice leads to fatigue

  • ‘The Experts Must Know’

  • Weakened fabric of relationships & defensivenessleads to negative culture

  • Slow: puts attention on yesterday’s causes


The positive core l.jpg
The Positive Core

  • Energy

  • Enthusiasm

  • Commitment

  • Action


The 4 d cycle l.jpg
The “4-D Cycle”

Discover

“What gives life?”

(The best of what is)

Appreciating

Dream

“What might be?”

(What is the world calling for)

Envisioning Results

Deliver

“How to empower, learn,

and adjust/improvise?”

Sustaining

Affirmative

Topic Choice

Design

“What should be - the ideal?”

Co-constructing


Full ai process l.jpg
Full AI Process

  • Select focus area or topic(s) of interest

  • Conduct interviews designed to discover strengths, passions, unique attributes

  • Identify patterns, themes and/or intriguing possibilities

  • Create bold statements of ideal possibilities ("Provocative Propositions")

  • Co-determine "what should be" (consensus re: principles & priorities)

  • Take/sustain action


Topic choice l.jpg
Topic Choice

A Fateful Act:

People, organisations and communities move in the direction of what we most frequently and systematically ask questions about!


Genius is in creating the question l.jpg
Genius is in Creating the Question

“What would the universe look like if I were riding on the end of a light beam at the speed of light?”

(Albert Einstein)


A positive change network l.jpg
A Positive Change Network

  • Special invitation & call to people to be change leaders

  • AI approach to positive change

  • Many applications

  • Self-organizing

  • Builds relationships

  • Connected through knowledge sharing & storytelling


One example worth l.jpg
One Example …WORTH

  • We Can Change the World - Training Program for Women in Business

  • Women’s Empowerment Program

  • American Refugee Committee – Guinea

www.worthwomen.org




Leap of faith cleveland nov 2003 l.jpg
Leap of Faith – Cleveland (Nov 2003)

  • Over 120 Students, Educators, Parents and Consultants

  • US, Canada, Brazil, England, Australia


Leap of faith cleveland nov 200335 l.jpg
Leap of Faith – Cleveland (Nov 2003)

  • Identify what’s working within our schools and education systems

  • Discover, dream, and design the best kind of schools and youth programs



Two local examples l.jpg

Community Development

Organisational Development

Two Local Examples …




Acknowledgements l.jpg
Acknowledgements

  • A debt of gratitude is owed to the following people for generously sharing their time, wisdom and materials:

    • David Cooperrider

    • Sue Annis Hammond

    • Gina Hinrichs

    • Mac & Marcia Odell

    • Marge Schiller

    • Other members of the Positive Change Corps and Appreciative Inquiry Consulting


Slide43 l.jpg

SUE JAMES

PO Box 197

Boronia, VIC, 3156

Phone: (03) 9758 2528

Mobile: 0402 979 384

Email: [email protected]

Web: www.suejames.com.au

www.appreciativeinquiry.com.au

www.aiconsulting.com.au


ad