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Presenters: Pam Lange Barb Rowenhorst Janet Hensley April 3, 2008 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Welcome Back. Presenters: Pam Lange Barb Rowenhorst Janet Hensley April 3, 2008. P reparing A ll S tudents for S uccess P urposeful instruction, assessment, and staff development . A ctively promote a climate of achievement: Incentives and celebrations.

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Presenters: Pam Lange Barb Rowenhorst Janet Hensley April 3, 2008

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Welcome Back

Presenters:

Pam Lange

Barb Rowenhorst

Janet Hensley

April 3, 2008


Preparing All Students for Success

Purposeful instruction, assessment, and staff development.

Actively promote a climate of achievement: Incentives and celebrations.

Structure strong school building leadership.

Support students in building knowledge and skills for success today and tomorrow.


To understand the definition of a learning group.

To learn about and create “learning group” activities to implement in the classroom.

To extend knowledge of Marzano strategy implementation.

Outcomes:


Welcome

Learning Groups

Cubing/Think Dot (revisited)

Lunch

Choice Boards/Menu Boards

Planning

Agenda


Janet


Exit Card

  • Easy strategy for

  • assessing student learning

  • Students respond to prompts or questions; turn in cards as they leave

  • Teacher uses card to help create groups, monitor student progress, revise lesson

    On Target, Strategies to Help Struggling Readers, page 27


Our Exit Card

  • List three things you learned today.


Our Exit Card

  • List two questions you’d still like to explore.


Our Exit Card

  • List two questions you’d still like to explore.


Our Exit Card

  • List one method of learning groups and/or choice that you might apply in your classroom.


To understand the definition of a learning group.

To learn about and create “learning group” activities to implement in the classroom.

To extend knowledge of Marzano strategy implementation.

Outcomes:


Pam


Various names have been given to this form of teaching, and there are some distinctions among these:

(adapted from Johnson, Johnson, and Smith, 1991)

Learning Groups


Learning Groups

  • Learning groups work together to accomplish a shared goal.

  • It is the instructional use of small groups so that students work together to maximize their own and each others’ learning.


Learning Groups

  • On a note card, jot down what you think the research will say about learning groups.


Students learn best when they are actively involved in the process.

Researchers report that, regardless of the subject matter, students working in small groups tend to learn more of what is taught and retain it longer than when the same content is presented in other instructional formats.

Students who work in learning groups also appear more satisfied with their classes.

Learning Groups - Research


Learning Groups - Research

When learning groups are compared with individual competition and individual student tasks, the effect size is .78.


Learning Groups - Research

Organizing students in heterogeneous learning groups at least once a week has a significant effect on learning.

(Marzano, Pickering and Pollock, 2001)


Quickly draw a T-chart on a blank sheet of paper.

On one side of the chart, list times you have used ability grouping in your classroom.

On the other side of the chart, list times you have used other forms of grouping.

T-Chart


Learning Groups - Research

Research shows that ability grouping as currently practiced:

  • Shows no consistent positive value for helping students generally.

  • Produces a negative effect in lower ability groups that more than offsets slight gains in higher-grouped children.

  • Produces an unfavorable effect on affective development.

  • Relates more to socioeconomic and ethnic status than to performance ability.

  • Cannot be shown to be responsible for positive scholastic effects due to the many variables inherent in curriculum and instructional design and delivery.

    Ubben, Hughes, Norris


Learning Groups - Research

  • Enhance student satisfaction with their learning experience.

  • Develop students’ social skills.


Learning Groups - Research

  • Help students develop oral communication skills.

  • Promote student self-esteem.


Learning Groups - Research

  • Increase student retention.

When you teach, you learn twice.

Seneca, Roman philosopher


Learning Groups - Research

  • Promote inclusion of special needs students.


Learning Groups

Based on the research, what changes, if any, might you make with the grouping you are currently doing within your classroom.


Forming Learning Groups

  • Informal Groups

    • Used for a few minutes or a class period

  • Formal Groups

    • Used for several days or even weeks

  • Study Teams/Base Groups

    • Long-term (semester or year)


  • Form a line using the criteria:

    • “How many siblings are in your family?”

    • Count all siblings.

      • Full, Half, Step, Other

  • Starting at the end of the line, create groups of four.

  • Select a place to work with your group.

Sibling Line-up (Informal)


Student preparation

Teacher preparation

Classroom application

Team information sharing

Accountability

Preparing for Learning Groups


Using the mat provided, prepare a graphic organizer of what you like and dislike about working in learning groups

OR

What you like or dislike about using learning groups in your classroom

You can use one of the graphic organizers provided on the mat or create one of your own.

Learning Groups


Designing Learning Groups

  • Informal Groups

    • Used for a few minutes or a class period

  • Formal Groups

    • Used for several days or even weeks

  • Study Teams/Base Groups

    • Long-term (semester or year)


Team Identity:

Team motto

Team cheer

Team mascot

Team song

Teambuilding: Learning Groups


Designing Learning Groups

Number in a Group:

  • Groups of 3-4 produce the largest percentile gain.

  • Pairs indicate the next largest percentile gain.

  • Groups of 5-7 indicate a negative result.

    Marzano, Pickering, Pollock, Classroom Instruction That Works


It is important to make sure you plan prior to using learning groups.

Handout: Planning for Learning Groups

Planning for Learning Groups


Form groups of two or three.

Select one scenario.

Discuss the guiding prompts on the “Planning for Learning Groups” handout.

Create chart paper with main learning group ideas.

Planning for Learning Groups


Designing Learning Groups

  • Informal Groups

    • Used for a few minutes or a class period

  • Formal Groups

    • Used for several days or even weeks

  • Study Teams/Base Groups

    • Long-term (semester or year)


barb

CUBING/THINK DOTS


KNOW

  • Participant will know the key principles of Cubing and ThinkDots and the application of them using a fairy tale.


UNDERSTAND

  • Participants will understand that Cubing and ThinkDots are related strategies that support differentiated processing.

  • Participants will understand how to develop practical applications and skills of Cubing and ThinkDots.


DO

  • Effectively create and implement Cubing and/or ThinkDots strategies.


Cubing

On Target, Differentiated Instruction, Grades 4-12, pages 12-13


CUBING Guide


CUBING diagram


Social Studies Level 1


Social Studies Level 2


Social Studies Level 3


cUBING demonstration


Use the article and website on Earth Day and develop some questions to correspond with the 6 sides of the cube. Post questions on chart paper.

Cubing Practice


CUBING

  • Use the first cube as your average cube, create 2 more: one lower level and one higher level.

  • ALL cubes need to cover the same type of questions, just written to the readiness levels.

  • Color-code or label your cubes so you know which level of readiness you are addressing.

  • Always remember to have an easy problem on each cube and a hard one regardless of the levels.

  • Decide on the rules. Will the students be asked to do all 6 sides? Roll and do any 4 sides? Do any two questions on each of the cubes?

  • Use old quizzes, worksheets, textbook-study problems, student generated, internet, etc. to help with writing questions.


ThinkDots


ThinkDots Guide


ThinkDots

  • Variation of Cubing; works well with older students

  • Students have to do all the tasks, they just do it in the order they roll.

  • Strategy used to review, demonstrate, and extend thinking

  • Can do a group of 6 people and each one does the task of what they rolled and then they have a group product at the end.


ThinkDots Demonstration


ThinkDots Demonstration

2. Goldilocks in 1 minute or less

http://youtube.com/watch?v=02cRfwmeCGY

3. Revolting Rhymes Goldilocks: Roald Dahl

http://youtube.com/watch?v=cstpvUODHYY

4. Goldilocks Song

http://youtube.com/watch?v=AvtkUOhL7yU

5. Rewrite the story of Goldilocks using more difficult vocabulary (example Little Red Riding Hood)

6. Goldilocks on trial

http://youtube.com/watch?v=IAnGP-VO2sw


Think Dots

Title: Algebra level 1


Think Dots

Title: Algebra level 2


Think Dots

Title: Algebra level 3


Using the article and website on Earth Day develop ThinkDot activities to correspond with the 6 sides of the die.

ThinkDots: Practice

Write on chart paper and post


CUBING/THINK DOTS

Suggestions

  • Use colored paper to indicate different readiness levels, interests or learning styles.

  • Let students choose which activities- for example: choose any three or have students choose just one to work on over a number of days.

  • If students have worked on activities individually, have them come together in groups by levels, interest or learning style to synthesize.


WHEN To USE

  • After a unit has been presented and students are familiar with the elements of the unit and conceptual skills.

  • To help students think about and make sense of the unit and concepts they are studying.


Concerns?

Cubing or ThinkDOTS can turn into glorified worksheets – but not if all activities are purposeful and focused on getting students to understand a concept in a multitude of ways.


Brainstorm


Integration Plan

  • With your table group, brainstorm the different ideas for using Cubing/ThinkDots.

  • A recorder will write the top three responses on chart paper and post at the front of the room.

  • You’ll have 5 minutes to complete this task.


Lesson Plan


Lesson Plan

  • Choose a unit from your content area or continue with the Earth Day theme.

  • Choose either Cubing or ThinkDots.

  • Follow the directions on the guide sheets and use the lesson plan guide to develop a lesson to use in your classroom in the next month.


Team Planning Time


lunch


janet

Choice Boards(Tic-Tac-Toe)

Menu Boards


On target booklet“Strategies That Differentiate Instruction”grades 4-12


Choice Boards (Think-Tic-Tac-Toe)

  • Allows students choice

  • Incorporates learning preferences

  • Takes readiness into account (basic and advanced)

  • Provides framework

    • On Target Differentiated Instruction , Grades 4-12, pages 14-15


Choice Board/Tic-Tac-Toe


  • Variations:

    • Easier choice board for struggling students and a more challenging choice board for proficient or advanced students.

    • Could have 3 kinesthetic tasks, 3 auditory tasks, 3 visual tasks.

    • Can assign students or a student what you want them to do.

Choice Boards/Tic-Tac-Toe


Look at Gardner’s multiple intelligences p.14

Look at 6th grade math and high school science examples on p.15

Pick a topic and discuss how you could make a choice board (may have to divide into age level groups)

CHART -- POST

Choice Boards/Tic-Tac-Toe


Menu Approach

  • Main dish: Everyone

  • Side dish: Pick and choose

  • Dessert: Optional but irresistible

    • On Target, Differentiated Instruction, Grades 4-12, pages 10-11


  • Take same topic or choose a different topic

  • Design a differentiated menu.

  • CHART and POST

Menu Approach


Let’s Try it


Lesson Plan


Marzano: Putting it All Together


To understand the definition of a learning group.

To learn about and create “learning group” activities to implement in the classroom.

To extend knowledge of Marzano strategy implementation.

Outcomes:


Team Planning Time


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