Phonological awareness
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Phonological Awareness. Ann Morrison, Ph.D. Phonological Awareness. Is an umbrella term over the following: Listening for sounds Rhyming Syllabication

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Phonological Awareness

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Phonological Awareness

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Phonological Awareness

  • Is an umbrella term over the following:

    • Listening for sounds

    • Rhyming

    • Syllabication

    • Phonemic awareness – phonemic awareness refers to a student’s ability to blend, segment, delete, add, and manipulate individual sounds within words

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Phonological Grain Size

  • Larger phonological grain sizes are longer utterances

    • Easier to hear and understand

  • Smaller grain sizes are brief sounds

    • More difficult to hear and understand

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Larger Grain SizeSmaller Grain Size

Phonological Awareness

  • Phonemic awareness

  • Syllabication

  • Rhyming

  • Attention to sound

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Phonological Awareness vs. Phonics

Phonological Awareness

Phonics

Includes letters as well as sounds

  • The manipulation of sounds and can be done with the eyes closed

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Matthew Effects of Reading

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Attention to Sound

  • Separating sounds

  • Distinguishing between sounds

  • Sequencing sounds

  • Location of sounds

  • Identifying same and different sounds

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Activity: Listening for Sounds

  • Sit quietly for 15 seconds, what did you hear?

  • Sit quietly for another 15 seconds, what did you hear first, second, third, etc.

  • Did you see the sounds being made? If not, how did you know what made the sounds?

  • Did any two sounds overlap? If so, how did you know they were two separate sounds?

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Rhyming

  • Word endings that sound the same

  • Spelling doesn’t matter

  • Onset-rime

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Rhyming Game

  • Teacher says a word

  • Student says a rhyming word

  • Go through all of the rhymes you can think of until you are repeating yourself

  • Words don’t need to be “real” words, nonsense words are fine

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Syllabication

  • A syllable is a unit of spoken language

  • Consists of a vowel with a consonant or consonants before and/or after the vowel

  • Closed syllables make the short vowel sound: at, napkin

  • Open syllables make the long vowel sound: so, human

  • Syllables influence the rhythm, stress, and prosody of spoken words (emphasis on the right syllable)

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Phonemic Awareness

  • Smallest units of sound

  • Addition

  • Deletion

  • Substitution

  • Manipulation

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Explicit Instruction

  • Give instructions: I am going to say a word and I want you to say a rhyming word

  • Model: For example, if I say mop, you could say hop, top, cop, rop, fop, or another rhyming word.

  • Practice: Ready, let’s try one.

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Error Correction

Sometimes students will not be able to do what you ask them to do

  • Acknowledge something the student did right

  • Model the correct answer

  • Have them say the correct answer with you, maybe repeat if necessary

  • Have them try again

  • Don’t make them guess

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Matching Initial Sounds Activity

  • Take a look at the items on your table

  • What are possible names for or ways to describe the items on your table?

  • One person picks an item and says a word to describe it, emphasizing the initial sound

  • Everyone else at the table looks for an item with the same initial sound

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


Initial and Final Sounds Activity

  • One person picks an item and says a word to describe it, emphasizing the final sound

  • The next person picks an object that begins with the final sound of the previous object and says it’s name

  • The third person finds an object that begins with the final sound of the previous object, and so on.

Ann Morrison, Ph.D.


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