Leveraging people the key resource for 21 st century success
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Leveraging People: The Key Resource for 21 st Century Success. Presented by Kevin Wheeler INACAP - Chile April 2008. MANUFACTURING. MARKETS. The Great Shifts. FARMING. The 21 st Century People Challenges. Are there enough skilled workers? Where will they come from?

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Leveraging People: The Key Resource for 21 st Century Success

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Leveraging people the key resource for 21 st century success

Leveraging People: The Key Resource for 21st Century Success

Presented by Kevin Wheeler

INACAP - Chile

April 2008


The great shifts

MANUFACTURING

MARKETS

The Great Shifts

FARMING


The 21 st century people challenges

The 21st Century People Challenges

Are there enough skilled workers?

Where will they come from?

What is the new “work?”

Creating an adaptable, skilled workforce.


Talent market 1900 2020

Talent Market - 1900-2020+


Current emerging trends

Current & Emerging Trends


Evolution to personalization

Evolution to Personalization


Evolution to personalization1

Evolution to Personalization

Personalized

Sum of All

Recruiting Types

Standard but with some customization

(i.e. Financial different from High tech)

Standard procedures

Face-to-face

1900

1910

1980s

1990s

2000


Emerging social norms

Emerging Social Norms

  • Personalization

    • Internet = customization

    • Have input to outcomes

    • Feel somewhat in control


New learning styles

New Learning Styles


Education evolution

Education Evolution

Learn by Doing

“20% Formal/80% Informal”

Mass Customization

“Have it your way”

Mass Education

“You have a few choices”

Sum of

All

Education

types

Mass Formal Education

“One type fits all”

Apprentice

“Learn by doing”

1900s

1930s

1970s

2000

2020


What we know

What We Know

  • Learning “how to” is easy.

  • Learning to think and innovate is new territory.

  • Gen Y learns in 20 min chunks, informally, through collaboration and networking.

  • Need loose structures, compass points end goals.

  • We call that. . .


Gen y the next dominant generation

Gen Y – The Next Dominant Generation

  • Diverse, Confident, Optimistic

  • Group and project focused

  • High ethical, environmental standards

  • Desire/seek coaches and mentors

  • Like to stay in communication

  • Focus is on fun, authenticity, and honesty

  • Technically VERY savvy


Gen y e learning lessons

Gen Y e-Learning Lessons

  • Invisibility of Technology

    • From TV to Internet to Mobile Phones

    • Technology IS learning

  • Expectation for Innovation/progress

    • Fast paced change

    • Short assignment/projects (i.e. variety)

  • Flexibility a virtue

    • Assemble diverse pieces to make your own unique solution (Scion)

    • Have it your way (McDonalds)


Toyota scion

Toyota Scion


Rise of online learning

Rise of Online Learning

  • Traditional Education

  • Online universities

    • Almost 3.5 million students were taking at least one online course during the fall 2006 term; a nearly 10 percent increase over the number reported the previous year.

    • The 9.7 percent growth rate for online enrollments far exceeds the 1.5 percent growth of the overall higher education student population.

    • Nearly twenty percent of all U.S. higher education students were taking at least one online course in the fall of 2006.


Back to the beginning

Back to the Beginning


Learning in communities

Learning in Communities

The Top 2 Social Networks


Construct your own learning space and share it

Construct Your Own Learning Space and Share It


Emerging social norms1

Emerging Social Norms

  • Emergence of collaborative communities & social networks

    • Group shared learning

    • Discussion and evidence sharing

  • Flexibility a virtue

    • Assemble diverse pieces to make your own unique solution (Scion)

    • Have it your way (McDonalds)


New work styles

New Work Styles


Ubiquitous connectedness

Ubiquitous Connectedness

Connected everywhere all the time.

Traditional technologies – job boards, applicant tracking systems, web sites are passive.


The changing workplace

The Changing Workplace


The slash worker

“The Slash” Worker

  • People with two or more careers increasing rapidly.

    • Minister/lawyer, Doctor/photographer, Accountant/carpenter

    • “. . .between 10 and 30 percent of the economically active population had experienced at least one career change in a 5-year period”


Quintessential gen y age 27

Quintessential Gen YAge 27

I work as an internet researcher for a recruiting company based in Cleveland.

I have an online retail business that I pursue on my own time as well.

I have a radio show, Research Goddess, on www.recruiterlife.com. I cover recruiting and research topics on this show.

I am also an adjunct instructor for SPIU and teach classes on database use and sourcing techniques.

I also have a blog, www.amybethhale.com. Check it out!


Style a evolutionary model

Style A – Evolutionary Model

  • Flexibility in when and where you work.

  • Physical workspace still important.

  • Lots of technology – Internet, mobile phones, collaboration over the Internet,.

  • Telecommuting common and expected.

  • Worker still dependent on organization for security, benefits, career.


Style b the free agency model

Style B - The Free Agency Model

  • Work where you want, when you want.

  • Some workers may be contractors or part time.

  • Physical contact important, but it doesn’t matter where.

  • Most workers still dependent on organization for security, benefits, career.


Style c a whole new look

Style C – A Whole New Look

  • Most workers freed from organization for career and security.

  • Most work is “sold” or contracted.

  • Workers are connected to communities of practice.

  • Physical contact may or may not be a consideration.

  • Networks and markets dominate.


New worker skills

New Worker Skills

1900

2000

  • One culture

  • Local/national awareness

  • Self-focused work

  • Work on personal projects

  • Organization is responsible

  • Rigid – one-way is right

  • Needs direction

  • Multicultural competence

  • Global awareness

  • Team & project-focused work

  • Collaboration (virtual)

  • Personal responsibility

  • Adaptability

  • Self-direction

  • High technical/digital competence


Thanks for listening

Thanks for Listening!

Kevin Wheeler

Global Learning Resources, Inc.

[email protected]

www.glresources.com


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