Lessons Learned from Recent Campaigns to Increase Local and State Transportation and Transit Funding
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Lessons Learned from Recent Campaigns to Increase Local and State Transportation and Transit Funding Presented at the Transit Initiatives PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Lessons Learned from Recent Campaigns to Increase Local and State Transportation and Transit Funding Presented at the Transit Initiatives And Communities Conference Stephanie PollackJune 26, 2013. Transit Funding: It Isn’t Just for Capital Projects.

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Lessons Learned from Recent Campaigns to Increase Local and State Transportation and Transit Funding Presented at the Transit Initiatives

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Lessons learned from recent campaigns to increase local and state transportation and transit funding presented at the transit initiatives

  • Lessons Learned from Recent Campaigns to Increase Local and State Transportation and Transit Funding

  • Presented at the Transit Initiatives

  • And Communities Conference

  • Stephanie PollackJune 26, 2013


Transit funding it isn t just for capital projects

Transit Funding: It Isn’t Just for Capital Projects


Transit operators are increasingly raising fares and cutting service

Transit operators are increasingly raising fares and cutting service


As funding gets tight maintenance is deferred and system condition worsens

As funding gets tight, maintenance is deferred and system condition worsens


And transit systems state of good repair backlog grows

And transit systems’ State of Good Repair backlog grows


In this environment expansion can become a dirty word

In this environment, “expansion” can become a dirty word


Therefore funding needs to address operating deficits and maintenance needs

Therefore, funding needs to address operating deficits and maintenance needs

If not addressed, undermine ability to secure funds for capital projects

If not addressed, transit advocates can be pitted one against another

State and local government may not have the resources to provide needed operating funds

“State and local governments, left to their own devices, will restrict funding on transit operations based on the income of their inhabitants, not based on need. . . . This is a paradox. The regions with relatively lower levels of poverty (such as Washington and Boston) can spend significantly more of their local and state funds on transit operations than regions with higher levels of poverty (such as Detroit and Memphis.”

YonahFreemark

The Transport Public

March 12, 2013


Conclusion transit proponents need to get smarter about securing funding

Conclusion: Transit proponents need to get smarter about securing funding

Maximizing transit share of available federal funds through the Metropolitan Planning Organization

Increasing total state spending on transportation and the share that goes to transit for operations, maintenance and new capital projects

  • Increasingly in state legislatures, not at the ballot box

    Securing funds – including operating funds – at the ballot box


Lessons learned from finance and funding campaigns

Lessons Learned from Finance and Funding Campaigns


Lesson 1 both the legislature and voters matter

Sometimes the campaign is entirely in the legislature

Keep New York Moving campaign (2009)

Transportation Works for Kansas (2010)

Other times legislation is needed prior to the ballot vote

Georgia T-SPLOST

Washington State enabling legislation for King County congestion reduction charge

California enabling legislation for Measure R

Lesson #1: Both the legislature and voters matter


Lesson 2 plans are better than projects

Lesson #2: Plans are better than projects


Lesson 3 understand what the public thinks

Lesson #3: Understand what the public thinks


Lesson 4 one key to victory in transit campaigns is those who will never use transit

Lesson #4: One key to victory in transit campaigns is those who will never use transit


Lesson 5 humor helps

Lesson #5: Humor helps


Lesson 6 the agency needs to be respected or invisible

Lesson #6: The agency needs to be respected—or invisible


Lesson 7 service cuts and fare increases are a strong motivator

Lesson #7: Service cuts and fare increases are a strong motivator . . .


But may not be enough

. . . But may not be enough


Lesson 8 include funds for operations including buses

Lesson #8: Include funds for operations – including buses

Measure R Spending Allocation


Lesson 9 don t neglect transit allies

Lesson #9: Don’t neglect transit allies


Lesson 10 if at first you don t succeed try try again

Lesson #10: If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again

St. Louis

Washington state/King County

Miami


The next great battle ensuring equity in funding sources

The next great battle:Ensuring equity in funding sources


Evaluating equity in transit funding

Evaluating equity in transit funding

When considering equity in funding mechanisms, the question is whether the method chosen is more regressive than other ways of paying for transit – including fares.

Who will pay the proposed taxes and fees – are they progressive or regressive?

Who will benefit from the investments made with the transit funding?

If those taxes and/or fees are not raised, who will pay the higher fares?


Sales taxes frequently used for transit are often regressive

Sales taxes – frequently used for transit – are often regressive

“Unlike an income tax, which generally applies to most income, the sales tax applies only to a portion of income that is spent — and exempts income that is saved. Since high earners are able to save a much larger share of their incomes than middle-income families — and since the poor can rarely save at all — the tax is inherently regressive. The average state’s consumption tax structure is equivalent to an income tax with a 7 percent rate for the poor, a 4.6 percent rate for the middle class, and a 0.9 percent rate for the wealthiest taxpayers.”


Gasoline taxes are not as regressive as commonly thought

Gasoline taxes are not as regressive as commonly thought


Rising property values that support value capture can also cause gentrification

Rising property values that support value capture can also cause gentrification


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