Introduction to k 6 visual arts education
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Introduction to K-6 Visual Arts Education. By Deirdre Russell-Bowie and Moira Gibson. Visual Arts. Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he or she grows up. (Picasso). The benefits of including the Visual Arts. Personal expression

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Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Introduction to K-6 Visual ArtsEducation

By Deirdre Russell-Bowie and Moira Gibson


Visual arts

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

Every child is an artist.

The problem is

how to remain an artist

once he or she

grows up.

(Picasso)


The benefits of including the visual arts

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

The benefits of including the Visual Arts

  • Personal expression

  • Develops imagination & creativity

  • A vital form of communication of ideas & thoughts in a non-verbal way

  • Develops problem solving skills

  • Develops language

  • Fosters self esteem

  • Develops fine motor skills


Visual arts1

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Visual Arts Lessons

    • Introduction

      • Motivating

      • Set rules and routines

      • Use stimulus (picture,

        music, artwork, poem,

        story, etc)

    • Demonstration

      • If new skills are to be learned

      • Make explanations clear

      • Repeat instructions, question for understanding


Visual arts2

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Visual Arts Lessons

    Development of skills, techniques &

    creative artworks

    • Allow children time to be creative

    • Be available to comment, praise, encourage, extend, keep children on task

    • Plan ahead for early finishers

  • Reflection and sharing

    • Talk with children about their artworks

    • Teach and reinforce the language of art

    • Check achievement of indicators from lesson plan


Visual arts3

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Practical tips for art lessons

    • Collect resources NOW

    • Check out school resources

    • Check out libraries, internet sites

    • Keep materials clean, tidy, labelled

    • Develop routines

    • Have children bring art smock


Visual arts syllabus

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts Syllabus

  • Making – Forms and Matter

    Forms (drawing, painting, S3D, printmaking, clay, fibre, electronic media)

    Matter (people, living things, objects, places & spaces, events)

  • Appreciating – their own work and others


Visual arts4

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Subject matter

    • People

      • Real

      • Imagined

      • Different cultures

      • Different contexts

      • Portraits

      • Realistic/abstract/cartoon


Visual arts5

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Subject matter

    • Emotions

      • Art can be used to express emotions

      • Use emotions as a stimulus for art

      • Often easier to draw than write about how you feel

Unknown Joy: Unknown joy is a mystery but we keep trying to find it in the world around us. JB


Visual arts6

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Subject matter

    Other Living Things

    • Animals

    • Birds

    • Fish

    • Reptiles

    • Plants

    • Trees….

I am the independent falcon:

I am like the independent falcon who lives by itself and doesn’t need anyone to follow. I am strong and I never give up. TD


Visual arts7

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Subject matter

    Objects

    • Still life

    • Fruit

    • Flowers

    • Vegetables

    • Toys

    • Cultural objects


Visual arts8

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Subject matter

    Places and Spaces

    • Landscapes

    • Cityscapes

    • Australia and overseas

    • Remembered / pictures

    • Real or fantasy

    • Outer space

The Country: Australia is a very dry country, so I chose yellow and orange to show this.JL

Sydney Harbour Bridge: from observation (Charcoal)


Visual arts9

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Subject matter

    Events

    • Celebrations

    • Special occasions

    • Festivals

    • Cultural, historical, religious

    • Direct experience

    • Reading / internet / pictures

New Year’s Eve


Using the language of art

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Using the language of Art

  • Elements of Art

    • Line

      • Give artwork shape

      • Bring focus / emphasis

      • Define or separate an object

    • In the classroom

      • Draw contours

      • Life drawings

      • Still life

      • Buildings, squiggle pictures

My life rules:This artwork represents my life because everything in it means something to me. The big heart stands for kindness. The 4-coloured ball represents fun. The fish represents love and hate. The road signifies my love of cars. KH


Visual arts10

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Elements of Art

    • Tone

      • Use of light and shade

      • Tonal quality affected by use of light and dark colours

    • In the classroom

      • Use spotlight to show how one side can be light and the other dark; draw or paint this effect

Picasso-styled self-portrait uses tone to express the artist’s emotions.


Visual arts11

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Elements of Art

    • Colour

      • Primary colours

      • Secondary colours

      • Tertiary colours

        • Brown, Grey

      • Complementary colours

        • Opposite

      • Analogous colours

        • Near


Visual arts12

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Elements of Art

    • Colour

      • Cool Colours

      • Warm colours

      • Monochromatic colours(Colour + black/white)

    • In the classroom

      • Create artworks exploring the different categories of colours


Visual arts13

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Elements of Art

    • Texture

      • Smooth, bumpy

      • Rough, prickly

      • Silky, sharp

    • In the classroom

      • Create rubbings

      • Photograph actual textures

      • Create collages


Visual arts14

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Elements of Art

    • Shape

      • Flat, 2D area defined by a boundary

      • Geometric

      • Irregular

      • Use lines to form boundaries

      • Can make 2D look 3D

    • In the classroom

      • Draw 3D objects on paper, concentrate on outline and shape


Visual arts15

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Elements of Art

    • Form

      • 3D shape

      • The space that an object takes up in its environment

      • Looks different from different angles

    • In the classroom

      • Create sculptures, carvings, papier mache artworks


Visual arts16

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Elements of Art

    • Space

      • Area between shapes and forms

      • Perspective gives 2D depth and reality

      • Crowded, empty

      • Positive (object) or negative (area around object)

    • In the classroom

      • Draw landscapes with background, middle and foreground

      • Examine artworks for perspective and create similar artworks

      • Explore negative and positive space


Visual arts17

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Elements of Art

    • Pattern

      • All around us

      • Effective in art

      • Symmetrical / Asymmetrical

      • Geometric / Irregular

    • In the classroom

      • Create geometric and irregular patterns

      • Use printing techniques to create patterns

      • Explore the work of Escher; create similar artworks


Visual arts18

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

Elements of Art: Test yourself!

  • L

  • T

  • C

  • T

  • S

  • F

  • S

  • P

  • Line

  • Tone

  • Colour

  • -Texture

  • Shape

  • - Form

  • Space

  • Pattern


Visual arts19

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Forms

    • 2D

      • Drawing

      • Painting

      • Printmaking

      • Marbling

      • Photography


Drawing

Drawing

Why teach children to draw?

Drawing is an extension of seeing- children

acquire the abilities of :

  • Perception

  • Interpretation

  • Imagination

  • Communicating the way we see, think and feel about our world


Different types of drawing

Different Types of Drawing

  • Explore different ways of making marks on the paper

  • Drawing to recall an experience

  • Imaginative drawings- futuristic event

  • Drawing from memory or observation

  • Drawings as illustrations

  • Cartoon drawings

  • Contour or continuous line drawings


Drawing media

Drawing Media

  • Pencils (2B, 4B, 6B)

  • Coloured pencils

  • Crayons

  • Oil pastels

  • Charcoal

  • Felt tipped pens

  • Coloured inks


Imaginative drawings

Imaginative Drawings

  • These drawings can be imaginative, fantastic, futuristic, mysterious and can inspire students to draw in different ways

  • For example- a mysterious picture at night

  • Robots or space creatures

  • A city of the future

  • A happy picture or any other emotion


Drawings from observation

Drawings from Observation

  • Drawings from close observations encourages children to look and see very carefully the properties and characteristics of what they are drawing

    -- a natural object

    -- an animal brought into the classroom

    -- an object such as a shoe

    -- a still life such as flowers


Drawings from different perspectives

Drawings from Different Perspectives

  • Look up at the clouds and imagine what shapes you can see in these forms

  • Look down at the earth & focus up close

  • Look through a magnifying glass & draw

  • Observe the textures & patterns of objects

  • Look through keyhole & draw

  • Look through a viewfinder & draw

  • Look at artist’s drawing and paintings

  • View things from an animal’s perspective


Different drawing papers

Different Drawing Papers

  • Paper in a variety of sizes

  • Cartridge paper

  • Brown paper

  • Newspaper

  • Coloured paper

  • Cardboard

  • Silver, gold, black paper


2d topics

2D Topics

These are some of the topics you may

consider for your CAPs presentation:

-- Political cartoons -- Poster art

-- Murals or banner-making -- Graffiti

-- Advertising -- Fashion in art

-- Portrait painting -- An Artist

-- Landscape Paint -- Egyptian art

-- Animals in art -- Asian art

*Free Choice of topic


Visual arts20

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Forms

    • 3D

      • Sculpture

      • Mask making

      • Puppets

      • Collage

      • Paper making


Visual arts21

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Forms

    • 3D

      • Ceramics

      • Cards

      • Textiles:

        • Silk painting

        • Batik

        • Tie Dying

        • Weaving

      • Digital forms


Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Art Appreciation Program

art

By

Moira Gibson


Art appreciation

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Art Appreciation

  • The aim of an art appreciation program is to develop strategies for looking at art and making sense of what they see

  • An art appreciation program should assist students to understand their own art, as well as other artists


Different forms of art appreciation

Different forms of Art Appreciation

  • a child reviewing his/her own drawings

  • two children comparing their paintings

  • a discussion between a teacher and child about his/her progress

  • children researching about their favourite artist in books, magazine, videos, internet

  • a visit to an art gallery

  • an artist giving a talk to students

  • a class discussion about some artworks


Visual arts22

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    • Personal, reflective responses

    • Analyzing artworks in terms of elements, style, history

    • Explore artist’s intentions

    • Peer artworks

    • Visit art galleries


Artmaps

Artmaps

Ask questions about what we see:-

  • What is it?

  • Who made it?

  • What is it made of?

  • How is it made?

  • Where is it made?

  • When was it made?

  • Why was it made?

  • What is it about?


Visual arts23

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    What is it?

Ken Done: Olympic Medallists’ Wildflowers(Naive, 21st C)

Monet: Waterlilies(Impressionism, 19th C)


Visual arts24

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    Who created it?

Da Vinci: Mona Lisa(Renaissance, 16th C)

Elioth Gruner: Spring Frost(Realism, 19th C)

Rembrandt: The Night Watch(Baroque, 17/18th C)


Visual arts25

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

Art Appreciation

What is it called?

Van Gogh:Starry Night(Post-Impressionism, 19th C)

The Blue Boy:Gainsborough(Rococo, 18th C)

Jackson Pollock:Composition(Abstract Expressionism, 20th C)


Visual arts26

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation – Why was it created?

Ken Done:Olympic Games(Naive, 21st C)

Picasso:Guernica(Cubism, 20th C)


Visual arts27

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    What media and

    techniques were

    used?

Margaret Preston:WA banksia (Coloured woodcut)

Rodin:The Thinker

(Bronze sculpture)


Visual arts28

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    In what historical,

    cultural and

    geographical

    context was it

    created?

Ingres:Joan of Arc(Neo-classicism, 18th Century)

Kandinsky:St George(Expressionism:Early 20th Century)

Goya: The Parasol(Romanticism, Mid-19th Century)


Visual arts29

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    • What message and/or emotions does it convey?

Edvard Munch:The Scream

Edvard Munch:Young Woman on the Shore


Visual arts30

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    • What might have happened before/after what is portrayed in the artwork?

Perdreau:Hayride


Visual arts31

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    • What elements of visual arts were used to convey the message?

LineToneColourTextureShapeFormSpacePattern

Van Gogh:Sunflowers

Picasso:Flowers


Visual arts32

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    • How does it compare with other artworks you have explored?


Visual arts33

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    What utilitarian use

    does it have, if any?

Annie Griffiths Belt:Signatures of 250,000 Australians join artist Fiona McDonald in supporting Aboriginal Claims


Visual arts34

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Sing!

Dance!

Paint!

Take photos!

Write!

Discuss!

Act out!

Visual Arts

  • Art Appreciation

    • What is your personal response to the artwork?

Salvador Dali:The persistence of memory


Art appreciation program

This program should include a variety of

images and objects in the visual arts:

PaintingFashion, jewellery

DrawingSculpture

PrintmakingWood

CeramicsPhotography

Fabrics/textilesComic books, cartoons

MuralsGraphic design

Art Appreciation Program


Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Illustrations and photos in children’s books

  • use these images for art appreciation

  • drawings, photos, paintings, collage, pop-up book

  • (Jeannie Baker, video of illustrators, pop-up book and cards)

    By discussing these with children allows for interpretation of images & generates lots of ideas for their own art-making

    A


Comparisons of artworks

Comparisons of Artworks

Looking for similarities & differences between two or more artworks seems to challenge our perceptions

  • Flowers (Van Gogh, M. Preston, Ken Done)

  • Portraits (Modigliani, Dobell)

  • Bedroom scene (Van Gogh, Grace Cossington-Smith)


Dinner party activity

Dinner Party Activity

Show a series of portraits. Children

step into these characters and imagine they are at a dinner party. Chat and mix around until you can find all the same characters as you

(e.g . at the end of the party you should have groups of Mona Lisas, Marilyn Monroes, Dame Mary Gilmores, Van Goghs)


Living sculptur es

Living Sculptures

In pairs, the children take turns at sculpting each other to form the exact pose & facial features in the artwork.

In groups, a child (the sculptor) moulds a number of children into the figures in a painting.


Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Detectives

In pairs, talk to the other friend about a great piece of art you have just bought.

A: What is your painting called?

B: It’s called …

A: Who painted it?

B: It’s by ….

A: What colours are in it?

B: It has mainly orange and blue (complimentary colours)


Be a detective

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Be a Detective

Select an artwork. Make a list of clues to

help us find this artwork if it were hidden

among other artworks.

This activity asks students to describe an artwork

to distinguish it from other works - develops

language & observation


Police descriptions

Police Descriptions

  • An artwork has been stolen from the room and you have to give a description of it to the police to find the work.

  • The more detail you give, the easier will be the police’s job


The art auction

The Art Auction

Imagine you are an auctioneer selling an artwork e.g,” Today we are have a wonderful Australian painting. Painted at the turn of the century, it is a fine example of the work of… Note the use of shadow and fleeting light. A rare chance to own a piece of Australiana. Imagine this fine

landscape on your lounge wall.


Improve your art appreciation program

Improve Your Art Appreciation Program

  • Arrange for an artist to spend some time working in your school (find out about Artists in schools Program and Architects in Schools Program)

  • Keep a look out for references to art in the media for use in your art program

  • Become a member of the Art Gallery of New South Wales or the Campbelltown Art Gallery

  • Use art appreciation activities to fill in the small gaps, before recess, lunch and the end of the day, in addition to your regular art appreciation activities


Writing about an event

Writing about an Event

  • What happened before the event?

    or

  • What happened after the event?

    This activity asks the children to

    consider the precise moment that the

    artwork represents


My favourite artwork

My Favourite Artwork

A writing or speaking activity

  • Select an artwork you would like to have on your bedroon wall.

  • Select an artwork for your parents or friends. Why do you think they would like this?


Visual arts35

Introduction to Visual Arts Education: Deirdre Russell-Bowie

Visual Arts

  • With this WEALTH of different visual arts learning experiences at your fingertips……

    how could you EVER consider that colouring in a stencil would be a valid Visual Arts activity????

STENCILS


Factors hindering creativity

Factors Hindering Creativity

These things limit creative expression

  • stencils

  • templates

  • an adult drawing for a child instead of encouraging the child’s own creative efforts

  • an adult constantly asking, “What is it?”


Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Developmental Stages of Children’s Art


Developmental stages

Developmental Stages

  • Disordered Scribbling / Manipulative

  • Controlled Scribbling

  • Named Scribble/ Symbolic/ Shape Stage

  • Recognizable / Pictorial Stage


Scribble or manipulative stage 2 4 years

Scribble or Manipulative Stage (2 - 4 years)

  • The child enjoys the muscular sensation of scribbling or watching marks appear

  • The child is not trying to draw, model or build objects, the experience is purely kinesthetic (movement)


Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Controlled Scribbling

  • Lines stop and start at different points

  • Begins to make circular movements on the page.

  • Experiments with dots and lines


Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Manipulative Stage

(2 - 4 years)

  • Children all start by experimenting with materials

  • Scribble drawings

  • Squeeze and pound clay

  • Use one colour of paint and makes a patch

  • Simple 2 piece construction

  • Experiment with collage


Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Symbolic Stage

(4 - 7 years)

The child

  • Begins to make lines & shapes

  • Begins to name some of these shapes

  • Interest in pattern making begins

  • Circle evolves to represent a head

  • First recognisable figures appear

  • Beginning of naming

  • Usually not recognisable to adult


Introduction to k 6 visual arts education

Symbolic Stage

(4 - 7 years)

•One shape may represent more than one thing

  • Begins to attempt more elaborate shapes

  • Emergence of form and pattern

  • Concern with shape and balance

  • Does not know beforehand what she is going to draw

  • Name may change several times during drawing

  • Emergence of mandala and sun


Representational stage 7 10 years

Representational Stage (7-10 years)

  • Beginning of recognizable figures

    (figures, houses, animals, vehicles, plants)

  • More complicated patterns

  • Figures become more detailed

  • Outward facing presentation

  • People floating in space - no horizontal ground line

  • Decorative element, development of symmetry

  • Announces beforehand what it will be


Later representational stage

Later Representational Stage

  • Use of ground line and skyline

  • Appearance of profile

  • Objects are shown in relationship to each other


Visual arts education

Visual Arts Education

For further information, see Chapters 6 and 9 in MMADD: About the Arts: An introduction to Primary Arts Education

by Deirdre Russell-Bowie, published by Pearson Education Australia


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