Progress monitoring techniques for students with multiple needs
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Progress Monitoring Techniques for Students with Multiple Needs. Christine Malecki Northern Illinois University [email protected] Thank you to Al Gonzalez (NIU alum) And Kelly Lyell, NIUGraduate Student School Psychology Program.

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Progress monitoring techniques for students with multiple needs

Progress Monitoring Techniques for Students with Multiple Needs

Christine MaleckiNorthern Illinois [email protected]

Thank you to Al Gonzalez (NIU alum)

And Kelly Lyell, NIUGraduate Student

School Psychology Program


Progress monitoring techniques for students with multiple needs

http://www.mediafire.com/?sharekey=1d2306f97c1c5d7e0de4fc1039a01674bbdf5e4fe427aabd0ac99885da44e881


Benefits of monitoring progress

Benefits of Monitoring Progress

Target the skill(s) you will teach during the year.

Help determine what is realistic but ambitious growth for your students.

Allow the students to have a goal and experience success and a purpose throughout the school year.


Benefits of monitoring progress1

Benefits of Monitoring Progress

  • Communicate with parents about their child’s accomplishments.

  • Allows the student’s future teachers to see what was accomplished and a potential method of progress monitoring.


Progress monitoring

Progress Monitoring

  • Curriculum-based measures (CBM) are one of the best known and used progress monitoring (PM) assessments

    • These measures capture a wide range of skills

  • Standard CBMs are not suitable for some subgroups of students

    • Students whose skills are below those of the CBM

    • Targeting specific, concrete skills beyond those of the standard CBM


Alternative progress monitoring

Alternative Progress Monitoring

  • Alternate progress monitoring assessments can be created based on the principles of PM and CBM

    • They will monitor the mastery of specific skills over time, which provides data that relates to student goals (Safer & Fleischman, 2005)


Progress monitoring1

Progress Monitoring

Define the Behavior (look at IEP goals)

Select a Measurement Strategy

Describe Current Level of Functioning

Develop a Goal Statement

Prepare a Chart/Data Collection Tool

Select a Decision-Making Plan


Progress monitoring2

Progress Monitoring

Define the Behavior (look at IEP goals)

Select a Measurement Strategy

Describe Current Level of Functioning

Develop a Goal Statement

Prepare a Chart/Data Collection Tool

Select a Decision-Making Plan


Good measurement strategies

Good Measurement Strategies

Reliable and Valid!!

Simple and Time-Efficient

Standardized

Can be done frequently

Provides a picture of performance over time

COMPARES APPLES TO APPLES

Can focus on long term growth or set a short term goal for an achievable skill

Progress Monitoring is not ideal if it is simply short-term, but it is better than nothing!

Measures are tied to instruction and useful for student program evaluation (Siegel & Allinder, 2005)

(Shapiro, 2004; Howell & Nolet, 2000)


Good measurement strategies1

Good Measurement Strategies

  • Disadvantages of the alternative assessments:

    • Validity and reliability of these assessments are very hard to determine (Deno, 1997)

    • Focusing on specific skills might not generalize into learning overarching goals (Shapiro, 2004)

  • General Outcome Measures are the most empirically supported method for assessing learning over time(Deno, 1997; Shapiro, 2004).

    • Research on GOM for students with multiple needs is being conducted with promising results(Wallace, Tichá & Gustafson) http://www.progressmonitoring.net/probes/sigcog.html


Progress monitoring3

Progress Monitoring

Define the Behavior

Select a Measurement Strategy

Describe Current Level of Functioning

Develop a Goal Statement

Prepare a Chart/Data Collection Tool

Select a Decision-Making Plan


Describing current level of functioning

Describing Current Level of Functioning

  • “A statement of the child’s present levels of academic achievement and functional performance, including…


Current level of functioning

Current Level of Functioning

Describes a student’s baseline level of performance on a target behavior (where is he/she now?)

Try out the skill you intend to target. Too difficult? Too easy?

Adjust…

Describe the student’s baseline.


Steps for current level of functioning

Steps for Current Level of Functioning

Collect baseline data

Is it stable data and typical? (at least 3 data points ideally)

Summarize the data (pick median score)


Progress monitoring4

Progress Monitoring

Define the Behavior

Select a Measurement Strategy

Describe Current Level of Functioning

Develop a Goal Statement

Prepare a Chart/Data Collection Tool

Select a Decision-Making Plan


Goal statements

Goal Statements

The goals is the expected level of performance at the end of an expected goal period.

Current Level (Currently Annie is reading 2 sight words out of 10.)

Conditions (In 9 weeks, when presented with a list of 10 sight words)

Behavior (Annie will read)

Criterion (8 out of 10 words per minute on 3 consecutive probes)

Draw your goal line on your graph.


Example cbm goals

Example CBM Goals

Currently Sally is reading 45 words per minute on 2nd grade reading probes. In 9 weeks, Sally will read 66 words per minute on 2nd grade CBM reading probes given once per week (with three 1 minute probes given and the median words read correctly recorded)

Currently Travis is writing 10 digits correct per minute on 2nd grade mixed-fact math probes. In 9 weeks, Travis will write 22 digits correctly per minute on 2nd grade CBM math probes given once per week.

Currently Dawn is writing 30 correct writing sequences in a three-minute written expression CBM story. In 9 weeks, Dawn will write 48 correct writing sequences on a written expression CBM given once per week.

Sally

Travis

Dawn


Keep it simple

Keep It Simple

Figure out a system to organize your materials and data. Keep it all in one place.


Progress monitoring5

Progress Monitoring

Define the Behavior

Select a Measurement Strategy

Describe Current Level of Functioning

Develop a Goal Statement

Prepare a Chart/Data Collection Tool

Select a Decision-Making Plan


Keeping track of data

Keeping Track of Data

Excel works great. Will draw a trend line for you.

“Chart Dog” on invention central website also good

http://www.jimwrightonline.com/php/chartdog_2_0/chartdog.php


Progress monitoring6

Progress Monitoring

Define the Behavior

Select a Measurement Strategy

Describe Current Level of Functioning

Develop a Goal Statement

Prepare a Chart/Data Collection Tool

Select a Decision-Making Plan


Decision making plan

Decision-Making Plan

Decide in advance how you will make decisions about the effectiveness of an intervention.

Teachers were 2.2 times more effective when they followed decision rules.

94% of 31 teachers found that the decision rules saved them time.


Decision making

Decision-Making

How often will data be collected? (ex: every 2 weeks)

If using CBM, how many probes and how will it be summarized for each data point (e.g. median score)?

How many data points? (at least 7 are recommended)

What is your decision rule?

(i.e. examine data trend compared to the goal)

(e.g. If John’s data is above the goal line for three consecutive data points, a change will be made (increase goal)). If below goal line for three consecutive data points, change intervention.


References

References

  • Deno, S. L. (1997). Whether thou goest…Perspectives on progress monitoring. In J. W. Lloyd, E. J. Kameenui, and D. Chard (Eds.), Issues in educating students with disabilities (pp. 77-99). Mahwah NJ: Lawrence Eribaum Associates, Inc.

  • Howell, K. W., & Nolet, V. (2000). Curriculum-based evaluation: Teaching and decision making (3rd Ed.). Belmont, CA: Thompson Learning.

  • Safer, N. & Fleischman, S. (2005). Research matters: How student progress monitoring improves instruction. Educational Leadership, 62(5), 81-83.

  • Shapiro, E. S. (2004). Academic skills problems: Direct assessment and intervention (3rd Ed.). New York: Guilford Press.

  • Siegel, E. & Allinder, R.M. (2005). Review of assessment procedures for students with moderate and severe disabilities. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 40(4), 343-351.

  • Wallace, T., Tichá, R., & Gustafson, K. (in press). Technical characteristics of general outcome measures for students with significant cognitive disabilities, 1-55.


Let s write some goals

Let’s Write Some Goals!

  • Remember, they need to include:

    • Current Level of Functioning

    • Condition

    • Behavior

    • Criterion


Writing a goal

Writing a Goal

  • Describe Current Level of Functioning

    • Sally can correctly tell time using an analog clock 1 out of 5 times

  • Develop a Goal Statement

    • Conditions (In 9 weeks, using analog clock probes)

    • Behavior (Sally will tell time)

    • Criterion (4 out of 5 times correctly)


Measurement strategy

Measurement Strategy

  • Remember, they need to be:

    • Reliable

    • Valid

    • Simple and Time-Efficient

    • Standardized


Creating probes

Creating Probes

  • Creating the wheel…

  • Recreating the wheel…

  • Borrowing and stealing…

  • Collaborating…


Example goals

Example Goals

  • Bobby can correctly identify 2 out of 10 survival words. In 18 weeks, using sight and survival word probes, Bobby will correctly identify 9 out of 10 survival words.


Money progress monitoring

Money Progress Monitoring

  • Jackson:

    • Currently Jackson is adding coins (pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters) to values that sum to less than one dollar correctly 2 out of 5 times. In 18 weeks, Jackson will correctly count using all different types of coins 10 out of 10 times (do the procedure 10 times, with 10 different sets of up to 7 different coins).

  • Jill:

    • Currently Jill is counting by tens using dimes correctly 1 out of 5 times. In 18 weeks, Jill will correctly count by tens using dimes 9 out of 10 times (do the procedure 10 times, with 5 different sets of up to 7 dimes).


Time progress monitoring

Time Progress Monitoring

  • Jack:

    • Currently Jack is matching analog and digital clock faces correctly 2 out of 10 times. In 18 weeks, Jack will correctly match 9 out 10 presented analog and digital clock faces on the hour and half hour.


Simple addition progress monitoring

Simple Addition Progress Monitoring

  • Jacob:

    • Currently Jacob is correctly solving 2 out of 10 simple addition problems (with sums less than or equal to 10). In 9 weeks, Jacob will correctly solve 8 of the 10 simple addition problems.

  • Jack:

    • Currently Jack is correctly solving 1 out of 5 simple addition problems (with sums lass than or equal to 10) with touchpoints on the numbers. In 9 weeks, Jack will correctly solve 4 out of 5 simple addition problems using the touchpoints.


Number identification

Number Identification

  • Jim:

    • Currently Jim is correctly pointing to the number given to him orally in random order (numbers 1 through 5) 2 out of 5 times. In 9 weeks, Jim will correctly point to the number given to him orally (numbers 1 through 5) when presented to him in random order 4 out of 5 (all 5 presented at each time).


Color identification

Color Identification

  • Brian:

    • Currently Brian is correctly pointing to the basic color (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, brown, black, white and pink) given to him orally in random order 2 out of 10 times. In 18 weeks, Brian will correctly identify 9 out of 10 basic colors when given orally given to him in random order.

  • Brandy:

    • Currently Brandy is correctly pointing to the color given to her orally (only red, white and green colors used) in random order 1 out of 5 times. In 18 weeks, Brandy will correctly identify the color given to her from the choices of red, white and green presented in random order (5 sets of red, white and green circles) in random order 5 out of 5 times.


Selected letter identification

Selected Letter Identification

  • Allen:

    • Currently Allen is correctly identifying 3 out of 10 letters presented on a probe (letters A through J only used). In 9 weeks, Allen will correctly identify 9 of the 10 letters presented on the probe orally (A through J only with each letter presented in random order).


Sight survival word identification

Sight/Survival Word Identification

  • Jill:

    • Currently Jill is reading 3 out of 10 sight or high-frequency words correctly. In 9 weeks, Jill will identify 8 out of 10 sight or high-frequency words on three different randomized lists of 10 words.

  • Joel:

    • Currently Jill is reading 3 out of 10 sight or high-frequency words correctly. In 9 weeks, Jill will identify 8 out of 10 sight or high-frequency words on three different randomized lists of 10 words.


Progress monitoring techniques for students with multiple needs

Sight/Survival Words Progress Monitoring Sheet #1

Name:

Date: Score / 12

push

go

stop

pull

walk

don’t walk

bus

Men’s Room

Women’s Room

danger

elevator

telephone

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1


Progress monitoring techniques for students with multiple needs

Sight/Survival Words Progress Monitoring Sheet #2

Name:

Date: Score / 12

police

fire

quiet

water

open

close

hot

cold

off

hot

cold

on

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1


Progress monitoring techniques for students with multiple needs

Sight/Survival Words Progress Monitoring Sheet #3

Name:

Date: Score / 12

upstairs

up

stand up

downstairs

down

sit down

exit

enter

911

outside

inside

mailbox

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1


Design a statement of transition services

Design a Statement of Transition Services

  • “Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child turns 14 ½, and updated annually thereafter, the IEP shall include…

    • appropriate, measurable, postsecondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to employment, education or training, and, as needed independent living

  • 23 IAC 226.230(c)


Vocational and employment

Vocational and Employment


Daily living and employment assessments

Daily Living and Employment Assessments


Daily living and employment assessments1

Daily Living and Employment Assessments


Daily living and employment assessments2

Daily Living and Employment Assessments


Daily living and employment assessments3

Daily Living and Employment Assessments


Let s do it

Let’s Do It!

  • Pick a student and a goal.

  • Using the principles we discussed, how would you create a progress monitoring assessment system for that goal?

  • (Change the students’ names…)

  • Exchange with a partner – do they know exactly what you mean? By reading it, would they progress monitor the exact way you have in mind?


Thank you

Thank You!


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