J g janitsch sonata da camera opus 5 ii c minor
Download
1 / 9

J.G. Janitsch : Sonata Da Camera , Opus 5, II C Minor - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 99 Views
  • Uploaded on

J.G. Janitsch : Sonata Da Camera , Opus 5, II C Minor . What instruments do you hear?. Melodic instruments (solo/duet) Oboe Background accompaniment Continuo Group: Harpsichord, strings. Terminology.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' J.G. Janitsch : Sonata Da Camera , Opus 5, II C Minor ' - cuyler


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
J g janitsch sonata da camera opus 5 ii c minor

J.G.Janitsch : Sonata Da Camera,Opus 5, II C Minor


What instruments do you hear
What instruments do you hear?

  • Melodic instruments (solo/duet)

    Oboe

  • Background accompaniment

    Continuo Group: Harpsichord, strings


Terminology
Terminology

  • Sonata da Camera: sonata (to play), da camera (the chamber). A secular work in three or four movements.

  • Continuo (aka basso continuo) an accompanying part which includes a bass line and harmonies, typically played on a keyboard instrument and with other instruments such as cello, bassoon


Terminology1
Terminology

  • Basso continuo generally used/was guided by the use of “figured bass”

  • Figured Bass: a notational system used during the baroque period that indicated the harmoniesand their inversion that would be played by a keyboard instrument. As harmonic concepts became more ingrained and became part of common practice, these symbols enjoyed a more universal understanding.



Terminology2
Terminology

  • In the medieval and renaissance periods, echoes of melodic material between voices/instruments and/or the interplay between those voices was referred to as imitation.

  • In the baroque, the term was replaced with “counterpoint”. In music, counterpoint is the relationship between voices that are interdependent harmonically (polyphony) and yet are independent in rhythm and contour


Vocal forms
Vocal Forms

  • Opera

  • Oratorio

  • Cantata

  • Each contained Chorus’, arias, recitatives and instrumental sections (sinfonia)

  • Could be sacred or secular although opera generally was secular in nature.


Chorus
Chorus

  • For choir or vocal ensemble. Functions as a “Greek chorus”, i.e., commenting on the action taking place or in some cases, furthering the story.

  • Handel Messiah :”For Unto Us a Child is Born”

  • Bach Cantata 180 “Wachet Auf”

  • Handel Rodrigo


Recitative
Recitative

  •  style of monody (accompanied solo song) that emphasizes and indeed imitates the rhythms and accents of spoken language, rather than melody or musical motives.

  • Bach

  • Telemann

  • Handel


ad