Previously, we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials.
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Previously, we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials. PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Previously, we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials. (x+y) 3 = x 3 + 3x 2 y + 3xy 2 + y 3. (x+y) 2 = x 2 + 2xy + y 2. If the patterns were not memorized, you could simply write it out and multiply. (x+y) 2 = (x + y)(x + y). (x+y) 3 = (x + y)(x + y)(x + y).

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Previously, we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials.

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Previously we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials

Previously, we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials.

(x+y)3= x3 + 3x2y + 3xy2 + y3

(x+y)2= x2 + 2xy + y2

If the patterns were not memorized, you could simply write it out and multiply.

(x+y)2= (x + y)(x + y)

(x+y)3= (x + y)(x + y)(x + y)

The square of a binomial is not a problem, just foil. The cube of a binomial is a little work. But any exponent higher than 3 is a problem. That would just be too much work to multiply 4 binomials.

(x+y)4= (x + y)(x + y)(x + y)(x + y) Too much work! Agreed?

The notation:

is read n choose r, “combinations of n things taken r at a time.”

For example if we had 6 people, how many different groups of 2 could we choose?

We can calculate this on a scientific calculator. We will show how to perform this operation on a TI-30XIIS and a graphing calculator. If you calculator different, please go to an assistant or your instructor.

Fortunately we have an alternative method which is the Binomial Theorem. Before we learn the binomial theorem, we need to have a little fun playing with our scientific calculators. We will only show what you need to “get by” on this section. We will not get involved with factorials, permutations, and combinations. We would give more detail on these topics in a course covering probability and statistics.


Previously we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials

1st the TI-30XIIS.

To find

To find

2nd, a graphing calculator.

  • Type in the 10.

  • Press the math key. Use the arrow to highlight PRB. Then scroll down to the nCr and press enter.

  • 3.Then type in the 7 and press enter. You should still get 120.

Examples.

  • Type in the 10.

  • Press the PRB key.

  • The choices are nPr, nCr, and !. Use the arrows to underline the nCr then press enter.

  • Type in the 7.

  • Press enter and you should get 120.


Previously we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials

Things to note:

1) The powers of x are decreasing while the powers of y are increasing.

2) For each term, the sum of the exponents on the x and y expressions is n.

3) The top number in the binomial coefficient always equals n.

4) For each term, the exponent on the y expression and bottom number in the binomial

coefficient are always one less than the number of the term.

The Binomial Theorem

For algebraic expressions, x and y, and any natural number, n,


Previously we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials

n = 6

Your Turn Problem #1

Expand (x + y)8

Answer:

Example 1: Use the binomial theorem to multiply (expand): (x + y)6


Previously we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials

Note: the x and y may not be variables. They can be any algebraic expression.

Example 2. Use the binomial theorem to multiply (expand): (x + 7)5

; (substitute 7 for y in the binomial expansion)

(x + 7)5

Your Turn Problem #2

Expand (x + 5)7

Answer:


Previously we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials

Note: the x and y can represent terms with variable powers.

Example 3. Use the binomial theorem to multiply (expand): (5a2 + 4b3)5

; (substitute 5a2 for x and 4b3 for y in the binomial expansion)

(5a2+ 4b3)5

Your Turn Problem #3

Expand (9m5 + 3k2)4

Answer:


Previously we learned patterns for squaring and cubing binomials

Note: the terms can have negative signs.

Example 4. Use the binomial theorem to multiply (expand): (2p3 – 5)7

(note: since one line of these problems is a little long, you may want to turn your paper sideways.)

Your Turn Problem #4

Expand (4n2 – 7)6

The End

4-26-07

Answer:

(2p3 – 5)7 ; (substitute 2p3 for x and -5 for y in the binomial expansion)


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