Review of the Ablative Absolute
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Review of the Ablative Absolute (Pages 295 – 296) No preposition in Latin PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Review of the Ablative Absolute (Pages 295 – 296) No preposition in Latin In English we sometimes say: Such being the case , we shall not go on . Such being the case is grammatically independent of the rest of the sentence. This

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Review of the Ablative Absolute (Pages 295 – 296) No preposition in Latin

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Review of the ablative absolute pages 295 296 no preposition in latin

Review of the Ablative Absolute(Pages 295 – 296)

No preposition in Latin

In English we sometimes say: Such being the case, we shall not go on. Such

being the case is grammatically independent of the rest of the sentence. This

construction is called the nominative absolute because the noun or its substitute

is in the nominative case and, with the participle, is independent of all other parts

of the sentence.

In Latin this construction is frequently used, but the words are in the ablative

instead of the nominative case.

Hence, the phrase is called ablative absolute.


Review of the ablative absolute pages 295 296 no preposition in latin

An Ablative Absolute may consist of:

1. A noun or pronoun and a participle.

Obsidibus datis, Caesar pacem faciet.

(With) Hostages having been given, Caesar will make peace.

2. A noun or pronoun and an adjective.

Militibus fortibus, urbs servata est.

(With) The soldiers (being) brave, the city was saved.

3. Two nouns.

Caesare duce, milites fortiter pugnaverunt.

(With) Caesar (being) leader, the soldiers fought bravely.


Review of the ablative absolute pages 295 296 no preposition in latin

The meaning of the ablative absolute is usually best expressed in English by an

adverbial clause. Always choose the translation that seems to express the thought

most accurately in English.

Obsidibus datis, Caesar pacem fecit.

1. Literal translation:

(With) The hostages having been given, Caesar made peace.

2. As subordinate clause:

a. Temporal: When the hostages were (had been) given, Caesar made peace.

After the hostages were (had been) given, Caesar made peace.

As soon as the hostages were (had been) given, Caesar made peace.

b. Causal:Since the hostages were (had been) given, Caesar made peace.

Because the hostages were (had been) given, Caesar made peace.

c. Concessive:Although the hostages were (had been) given, Caesar made peace.

d. Conditional:If the hostages were (had been) given, Caesar made peace.

3. As a main clause:

The hostages were (had been) given, and, Caesar made peace.


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