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Pathways to Persistence Presented by Rick Dollieslager Chair, Tidewater Regional Center for Teaching Excellence adapt - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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VCCS Dropout Rates Freshman to Sophomore Two-Year Public Institutions 49.8% VCCS Student Retention Rate Summary Fall 2002-Fall 2003.

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VCCS Dropout RatesFreshman to SophomoreTwo-Year Public Institutions49.8%VCCS Student Retention Rate SummaryFall 2002-Fall 2003


All colleges are to submit plans to improve graduation rates towards the goal of ranking in the top 10% for graduation, retention, and placement rates by 2009…. Dr. Glenn DuBoisChancellor’s 2004-2005 Goals


Three types of attrition

Three types of attrition towards the goal of ranking in the top 10% for graduation, retention, and placement rates by 2009….

Expected and justified

Stopping out

Unnecessary and preventable by institutional interventions


Major factors in attrition

Major Factors in Attrition towards the goal of ranking in the top 10% for graduation, retention, and placement rates by 2009….

Dissonance

Transition difficulties

Lack of certainty about major

Irrelevance

Isolation and lack of connection


Why do students leave college

Why do students leave college? towards the goal of ranking in the top 10% for graduation, retention, and placement rates by 2009….

Incongruence

What they encounter is not what they expected….


Why do students leave college1

Why do students leave college? towards the goal of ranking in the top 10% for graduation, retention, and placement rates by 2009….

Isolation

Inability to connect with significant members of the campus community….


Students don’t have interactions with institutions; they have encounters and interactions with individuals.


What happens to students have encounters and interactions with individuals.after they enroll frequently has a more powerful impact on whether they stay and achieve their goals or leave. Tinto 1987, 1993


Transforming students through validation

Transforming Students Through Validation have encounters and interactions with individuals.

Success appears to be contingent on whether [faculty and staff] can validate students in an academic or interpersonal way.

Dr. Laura Rendon, 1994


We demonstrate concern for students through our actions
We demonstrate concern for students through our actions. have encounters and interactions with individuals.

Act “as if” small encounters matter because they often do.


ALL aspects of campus life can have an impact on persistence or attrition decisions and behaviors.Promoting student persistence requires an institution-wide commitment.


The “secret” of effective retention lies in the development of effective educational communities that involve students in their social and intellectual life and ensure that all students are able to learn and grow while they are in college. “Educational Principles of Effective Retention,” Vincent Tinto, 1988


Institutions which consciously reach out to establish personal bonds among students, faculty, and staff, and which emphasize frequent and rewarding contacts outside the classroom are those which most successfully retain students. Such interaction is the single strongest predictor of student persistence. Leaving College Vincent Tinto, Professor of Education Syracuse University, 1987, 1993


I assumed that the most important and memorable academic learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true.

When we asked students to think of a specific critical incident or moment that had changed them profoundly, four-fifths of them chose a situation or event outside the classroom. Richard Light, Harvard University Making the Most of College, 2001


National institutional priorities report community junior technical colleges noel levitz inc
National Institutional Priorities learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true. ReportCommunity, junior, technical collegesNoel-Levitz, Inc.

  • Concern for the Individual

  • Instructional Effectiveness

  • Academic Advising

  • Campus Climate

  • Student Centeredness


Original persistence scores
ORIGINAL PERSISTENCE SCORES learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true.

  • + 14

  • +21

  • - 6

  • -17

  • +35

  • +1

  • -30

  • - 2

  • +9

  • 0


Simulation conclusions

SIMULATION CONCLUSIONS learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true.

Illustrates that the decision to withdraw is usually a complex process involving a series of events which occur over time, rather than a decision resulting from a single event at one point in time.


Simulation conclusions1

SIMULATION CONCLUSIONS learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true.

Illustrates that student characteristics (profiles) combine with institutional experiences (incidents) to shape a student’s decision to persist or withdraw.


Simulation conclusions2

SIMULATION CONCLUSIONS learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true.

Illustrates that similar experiences and events affect students differently and that we can respond to students and their needs if we come to know them from our interactions with them--in class, in advising meetings--by paying attentionto small encounters.


Simulation conclusions3

SIMULATION CONCLUSIONS learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true.

Illustrates that ALL aspects of campus life can have an impact on persistence or attrition decisions and behaviors.


Simulation conclusions4

SIMULATION CONCLUSIONS learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true.

Illustrates that careful interventions by individuals and/or specifically designed programs can have a positive influence on students’ social and academic integration and, subsequently, on their persistence behaviors.


Simulation conclusions5

SIMULATION CONCLUSIONS learning goes on inside the classroom. The evidence shows the opposite is true.

To encourage and promote an institutional dialogue about collaborations that can enhance programs, services, attitudes and behaviors that can enhance student satisfaction, achievement, and persistence.


Coordination of the efforts of faculty and staff, academic and student affairs, should be the norm, not the exception.

Rather than working at odds, campus units must come to see themselves as working together.Tinto, 1993


What on-campus Pathways participants report: and student affairs, should be the norm, not the exception.The simulation exercise showed me that I matter, that I can make a difference….



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