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NP-completeness. Class of hard problems. Outline. Introduction Problems and Languages Turing machines and algorithms P and NP Satisfiability problem Reduction Other NP-complete problems. Problems. A problem can be defined as a mapping from the instance to the answer. Examples:

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Np completeness

NP-completeness

Class of hard problems


Outline
Outline

  • Introduction

  • Problems and Languages

    • Turing machines and algorithms

    • P and NP

  • Satisfiability problem

  • Reduction

  • Other NP-complete problems

NP-complete Problems


Problems
Problems

  • A problem can be defined as a mapping from the instance to the answer.

  • Examples:

    • Shortest path problem

      {<graph G, node u, node v>}  {a shortest path P}

    • 0/1 Knapsack problem

      {<set S of objects, capacity C>} {the maximum value}

    • Closest-pair-of-points problem

      {<set P of points>}  {<point q, point r>, which is the closest pair of points in P}.

    • Satisfiable problem

      {<boolean formula>}  {T, F}

NP-complete Problems


Abstract problems
Abstract problems

A set of instances

A set of solutions

NP-complete Problems


Decision problems
Decision Problems

  • A decision problem is a problem whose answer is either “yes” or “no”.

  • Example: Satisfiable problem

    {<boolean formula>}  {T, F}

  • Any problem can be described in term of a decision problem.

NP-complete Problems


Reformulate problems as decision problems
Reformulate Problems as Decision Problems

  • Shortest path problem

    • {<graph G, node u, node v, int k>}  {T, F}

    • The answer is T iff there is no path between u and v, which is shorter than k.

  • 0/1 Knapsack problem

    • {<set S of objects, capacity C, value V>} {T, F}

    • The answer is T iff there is no selection of objects fitted in the sack which yields higher value than V.

NP-complete Problems


Encoding of decision problems
Encoding of Decision Problems

  • An encoding of a problem is a mapping from the set of instances of the problem to a set of strings.

  • Example: shortest path

    • The encoding of <graph G, node u, node v, path p> in the Shortest path problem is a string which is used to describe G, u, v, and p.

      • G can be described by a string of its adjacency matrix.

      • u and v can be described by two strings, indicating the node labels.

      • p can be described by a sequence of node in the path.

NP-complete Problems


Abstract concrete problems
Abstract/ Concrete problems

A set of instances

Mapping

(encoding)

Abstract

problem

Mapping

(encoding)

A set of solutions

Concrete

problem

NP-complete Problems


Encoding of problems
Encoding of Problems

  • Is X a prime ?

    f:{X |X>0 and is a binary number}{Y,N}

    f(x) = Y if X is prime

    f(x) = N otherwise

  • Is a 3-CNF expression X satisfiable?

    f:{X | X is a 3-CNF expression}  {Y, N}

    f(x) = Y if X is satisfiable

    f(x) = N otherwise

NP-complete Problems


Why encoding is important
Why encoding is important?

  • Encoding determines the instance size.

  • Example: an integer n

    • n encoded as one number

      => instance size = 1

    • n encoded as binary number

      => instance size = log2 n

    • n encoded as unary number

      => instance size = n

NP-complete Problems



Languages and decision problems
Languages and Decision Problems

  • Let  be an alphabet.

  • A language over  is a set of strings created from symbols in .

    • B={0,1}* is the set of all binary strings.

    • { is a palindrome} is a language over B.

  • A yes-instance (or no-instance) is an instance whose answer is “yes” (or “no”).

  • An instance must be either a yes- or a no-instance.

NP-complete Problems


Languages and decision problems1
Languages and Decision Problems

  • A decision problem can be encoded in a language {| is an encoding of a yes- instance}.

    • The shortest path problem can be encoded as {e(G, u, v, p>)| p is the shortest path between u and v in the graph G}.

NP-complete Problems



Turing machines tm
Turing machines (TM)

  • A Turing machine is a machine which takes a string on its input tape, and decides whether to accept or to reject the string.

  • A Turing machine contains

    • A finite-state control with

      • A start state

      • A halt state

      • Transition function: state x symbol  state x symbol x {R,L}

    • A tape with a Read/Write headwhich can move left and right.

NP-complete Problems


Deterministic nondeterministic turing machines
Deterministic/ Nondeterministic Turing machines

  • Difference

    • A transition is deterministic or nondeterministic.

  • What is nondeterminism?

    • Given a state of a machine/program, there is more than one possible next step.

  • Examples

    • Deterministic: functions.

    • Nondeterministic: relations.

NP-complete Problems


Example of a dtm
Example of a DTM

s

/@,R

/,L

1/,R

p1

q1

/,R

0/,R

@/,R

0/0,L

1/1,L

0/0,R

1/1,R

p2

p4

q2

0/,L

/,L

/1,L

p3

h

NP-complete Problems


How a dtm works
How a DTM works

s

/,L

/@,R

1/,R

p1

q1

@

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

/,R

0/,R

@/,R

0/0,L

1/1,L

0/0,R

1/1,R

p2

p4

q2

/1,L

/,L

0/,L

On the input 0001000,

the TM halts.

h

p3

NP-complete Problems


How a dtm works1
How a DTM works

s

/,L

/@,R

1/,R

p1

q1

@

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

/,R

0/,R

@/,R

0/0,L

1/1,L

0/0,R

1/1,R

p2

p4

q2

/1,L

On the input 0000000,

the TM hangs.

/,L

0/,L

h

p3

NP-complete Problems


Example of ntm
Example of NTM

  • Let L={ww| w{0,1}*}

r0

@/,R

0/@,R

0/0,R

1/1,R

0/0,L

1/1,L

/,L

s

q0

t0

/@,R

0/0,L

1/1,L

0/,L

0/,L

/,R

/@,L

@/,L

v

p

u

h

/,R

/,R

1/,L

1/,L

0/0,R

1/1,R

q1

t1

0/0,L

1/1,L

/,L

@/,R

1/@,R

0/0,R

1/1,R

r1

NP-complete Problems


Accept decide
Accept/Decide

  • Let T be a Turing machine.

  • For a string  over ,

    • T accepts  iff T halts on  with output “1”.

    • T rejects  iff T halts on  with output “0”.

    • T hangs on  iff T dose not halts on .

  • For a language L over ,

    • T accepts L iff, for any string  in L, T accepts .

    • T decides  iff

      • for any string  in L, T accepts , and

      • for any string  inL, T rejects .

NP-complete Problems


Time complexity
Time complexity

  • A language L is accepted/decided in O(f(n)) by a Turing machine T if, for any length-n string  in L,  is accepted/decided in k·f(n) by a Turing machine T, for some constant k.

  • A language L is accepted/decided in polynomial time by a Turing machine T if, L is accepted/decided in O(nk) by a Turing machine T, for some constant k.

NP-complete Problems


Church turing thesis
Church-Turing Thesis

  • If there is a Turing machine deciding a problem  in O(f), then there is an algorithm solving  in O(f).

  • Turing machine  algorithm

NP-complete Problems



Class of p
Class of P

  • If  is a problem in P, given any instance I of ,

    • there is an algorithm which solves I in O(nk), or

    • there is a Turing machine which accepts e(I) in O(nk) steps,

      where n is the size of e(I) and k is a constant.

  • What does this mean?

    • If  is in P,  is easy because it can be solved in polynomial time.

NP-complete Problems


Class of np
Class of NP

  • If  is a problem in P, given any instance I and any certificate C of ,

    • there is an algorithm which verifies, in O(nk), that C is the answer of I, for any C and I.

    • there is a Turing machine which verifies, in O(nk), that C is the answer of I, for any C and I.

    • there is a nondeterministic Turing machine which accepts e(I), in O(nk), for any I.

      where n is the size of e(I) and k is a constant.

      What does this mean?

    • If  is in NP,  is not necessarily easy because it can only be verified in polynomial time.

NP-complete Problems


Easy problems hard problems

Can be solved in polynomial time

Prove by showing the algorithm.

Cannot be solved in polynomial time

Prove by showing that there is no polynomial-time algorithm.

Can verify the answer in polynomial time.

Can usually be solved by an exponential-time algorithm.

Brute-force algorithm: try every possible answers.

Easy problems / Hard problems

NP-complete Problems


Class of co np
Class of co-NP

  • L is in co-NP ifL is in NP.

NP

co-NP

P

NP-complete Problems


Reduction

Reduction

Is X more difficult than Y?


Reduction1
Reduction

  • Let L1 and L2 be languages over 1 and 2, respectively. L1 is (polynomial-time) reducible to L2, denoted by L1L2, if there is a TM M computing a function f: 1*2* such that wL1  f(w)L2 in polynomial time.

  • Let P1 and P2 be problems. P1 is (polynomial-time) reducible to P2, denoted by P1P2, if there is an algorithm computing a function f: 1*2* such that w is a yes-instance of P1  f(w) is a yes-instance of P2 in polynomial time.

NP-complete Problems


Meaning of reduction
Meaning of Reduction

P1 is reducible to P2

if  DTM computing, in polynomial time, a function f: 1*2* such that w is a yes-instance of P1  f(w) is a yes-instance of P2.

  • If you can map yes-instances of problem A to yes-instances of problem B, then

    • we can solve A in polynomial time if we can solve B in polynomial time.

    • it doesn’t mean we can solve B in polynomial time if we can solve A in polynomial time.

NP-complete Problems



Satisfiability problem sat
Satisfiability problem (SAT)

  • Given a Boolean expression , is  satisfiable?

  • (A~BC)(~A~C)B~C is not satisfiable.

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat problem
3CNF-SAT Problem

  • Given an expression  in 3CNF, is  satisfiable?

  • Given an expression  in 3CNF, is there a truth assignment of propositions in  which makes  true?

  • Example:

    • =(PQR)(PQR)(PSR)(PSR)

    •  is satisfiable when

      • P=t, Q=f, R=f, S=t or

      • P=f, Q=f, R=f, S=t

NP-complete Problems


Clique or complete subgraph
Clique or Complete Subgraph

  • A graph G=(V,E) has a clique if there is W V such that for all nodes a and b in W, there is an edge between a and b.

C

B

F

A

E

D

NP-complete Problems


Clique problem
Clique Problem

  • Given a graphG=(V,E) and an integer k, is there a clique of size k in G?

  • Example: Is there a clique of size 3, 4, or 5, in the graph below?

C

B

F

A

E

D

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat clique
3CNF-SAT  Clique

Proof:

To prove that 3CNF-SAT  Clique,

  • Find a function f such that

    • a 3CNF expression  is satisfiable 

      a graph G has a clique of size k, where <G,k>=f() and

    • there is a TM computing f in polynomial time.

      f can be defined as follows:

      Let = (111213)(212223)…(n1n2n3)

      f() = <G,n>, where G=(V, E),

    • V={ij|0<i<n+1, 0<j<4}, and

    • E={(ij, km)| i≠k and ij≠~km}

NP-complete Problems


Building a graph from a 3cnf exp
Building a graph from a 3CNF exp.

(PQR)(PSR)(PSR)

~Q

P

R

~P

P

~S

S

~R

~R

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat clique cont d
3CNF-SAT  Clique (cont’d)

  • Show  is satisfiableG has clique of size n

  • Let G has a clique of size n.

  • From the definition of G, there is no edge between vertices

    • in the same disjunctive clause, and

    • representing a literal and its negation.

  • A link between two nodes means that the two literals can be true at the same time, and they are in different disjunctive clauses.

NP-complete Problems


Satisfiability and clique
Satisfiability and Clique

(PQR)(PSR)(PSR)

~Q

P

R

~P

P

~S

S

~R

~R

NP-complete Problems


Satisfiability and clique1
Satisfiability and Clique

(PQR)(PQR)(PQR)(PQR)

Q

P

R

~P

P

Q

Q

R

~R

~P

~R

Q

NP-complete Problems


Satisfiability and clique2
Satisfiability and Clique

(PQR)(PQR)(PQR)(PQR)

Q

P

R

~P

P

Q

Q

R

~R

~P

~R

Q

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat clique cont d1
3CNF-SAT  Clique (cont’d)

  • There is a TM computing f in polynomial time.

NP-complete Problems



Reflexivity of reduction
Reflexivity of reduction

Theorem:

Let L be a language over . L  L.

Proof:

Let L be a language over .

Let f be an identity function from **.

Then, there is a TM computing f.

Because f is an identity function, wL  f(w)=wL.

By the definition, L  L.

NP-complete Problems


Property of reduction
Property of reduction

Theorem:

Let L1 and L2 be languages over .

If L1L2, thenL1L2.

Proof:

Let L1 and L2 be languages over .

Because L1L2, there are a function f such that wL1  f(w)L2, and a TM T computing f in polynomial time.

wL1  f(w)L2.

By the definition,L1L2.

NP-complete Problems


Transitivity of reduction
Transitivity of reduction

Theorem: Let L1, L2 and L3 be languages over .

If L1  L2 and L2  L3, then L1  L3.

Proof: Let L1, L2 and L3 be languages over .

There is a function f such that wL1  f(w)L2, and a TM T1 computing f in polynomial time because L1 L2.

There is a function g such that wL2  g(w)L3, and a TM T2 computing g in polynomial time because L2  L3.

wL1  f(w)L2  g(f(w))L3, and T1T2 computes g(f(w)) in polynomial time .

By the definition, L1  L3.

NP-complete Problems


Using reduction to prove p np
Using reduction to prove P/NP

Theorem: If L2 is in P/NP, and L1L2, then L1 is also P/NP.

Proof:

Let L1 and L2 be languages over , L1L2, and L2 be in P/NP.

Because L2 is in P/NP, there is a DTM/NTM T2 accepting L2 in polynomial time.

Because L1L2, there is a DTM T1 computing a function f such that wL1  f(w)L2 in polynomial time.

Construct a DTM/NTM T=T1T2. We show that T accepts L1in polynomial time.

  • If wL1, T1 in T computes f(w)L2 and T2 in T accepts f(w), in polynomial time.

  • If wL1, T1 in T computes f(w) L2 and T2 in T does not accept f(w) in polynomial time.

    Thus, L1 is also in P/NP.

NP-complete Problems


Using reduction to prove co np
Using reduction to prove co-NP.

Theorem:

If L2 is in co-NP, and L1L2, then L1 is also in co-NP.

Proof:

Let L1 and L2 be languages over , L1L2, and L2 be in co-NP.

Because L2 is in co-NP,L2 is in NP.

Because L1L2,L1L2. Then,L1 is in NP.

Thus, L1 is co-NP.

NP-complete Problems



Np completeness2
NP-completeness

  • A language (or problem) L is NP-hard if, for any language L' in NP, L' ≤ L.

  • A language (or problem) L is NP-complete if it is in NP and is NP-hard.

NP-complete Problems


Why interested in np complete problem
Why interested in NP-complete problem

  • Implication on the problem “is P=NP ?”

  • If an NP-complete problem is in P, then P=NP.

  • Why?

    • If L is NP-complete, any language in NP is reducible to L.

    • Since L is in P, any language in NP is reducible to a language in P.

    • Then, any language in NP is in P.

NP-complete Problems


Lemma
Lemma

If L is a language such that L’ ≤ L for some L’ ∈ NPC, then L is NP-hard.

Moreover, if L ∈ NP, then L ∈ NPC.

Proof

Since L’ is NP-complete, for all L’’ ∈ NP, we have L’’ ≤ L’ .

BecauseL’ ≤ L, L’’ ≤ L by transitivity.

Then,L is NP-hard.

If L ∈ NP, we also have L ∈ NPC.

NP-complete Problems


Ground reduction

Ground Reduction

SAT is NP-complete


Sat is np complete
SAT is NP-complete

  • To prove that SAT is NP-complete:

    • Prove SAT is in NP

    • Prove any language in NP is reducible to SAT.

  • SAT is in NP: Informal proof

    • Given a certificate which is a truth assignment of propositions which makes the expression true, there is an algorithm that can verify the answer in polynomial time.

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Prove any language in NP is reducible to SAT.

Proof:

Let L be any language in NP.

Then, there is an NTM T which accepts L in polynomial time p(n), where n is the input size.

To show that L ≤ SAT, we find a function f such that x L  f(x)  SAT.

That is, to find a function f such that x L  f(x) is satisfiable.

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d1
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

That is, to find a function f such that T accepts x  f (x) is satisfiable.

Let f (x)=g1(x)g2(x)g3(x)g4(x)g5(x)g6(x)g7(x).

f (x) describes the sequence of configuration changes which leads to the halt state of T.

f(x) contains propositions Qi,j, Hi,k, and Si,k,j .

Qi,j: T is in state qj after i moves.

Hi,k: T’s tape head is on square k after i moves.

Si,k,j: Symbol jis on square k after i moves.

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d2
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

g1(x): the initial configuration of T at the beginning.

g2(x): accepting configuration of T after N steps.

g3(x): possible transitions of T.

g4(x): hanging configuration.

g5(x): describe that T is in exactly one state at a time.

g6(x): describe that each square of the tape contains exactly one symbol.

g7(x): describe that change can only made on the tape square on which the tape head is located.

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d3
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

g1(x): describe the initial configuration of T at the beginning.

n N

Q0,0  H0,0  S0,0,0   S0,k, ik   S0,k, 0

k=1k=n+1

∆ 0 1 1 0 1 ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆

q0

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d4
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

g2(x): describe accepting configuration of T after N steps.

QN,a

ha

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d5
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

g3(x): describe possible transitions of T.

For each transition

δ(qj, l)= (qt1, z1, D1), δ(qj, l)= (qt2, z2, D2)

(Qi,j Hi,k Si,k,l)((Qi+1,t1  Hi+1,d1(k)  Si+1,k,z1)

V (Qi+1,t2  Hi+1,d2(k)  Si+1,k,z2))

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d6
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

g4(x): describe hanging configuration.

For each transitionδ(qj, l)= ø

(Qi,j  Hi,k  Si,k,l)  (Qi+1,j  Hi+1,k  Si+1,k,l)

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d7
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

g5(x): T is in exactly one state at a time.

For each time i and states qj0, qj1, qj2, …, qj0≠ qj1 ≠ qj2 ≠ … :

(Qi,j0 v Qi,j1 v Qi,j2 v …)

  • At least one state

    (~Qi,j0v~Qi,j1)(~Qi,j1v~Qi,j2)(~Qi,j0v~Qi,j2)…

  • Never two state at the same time

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d8
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

g6(x): state that each square of the tape contains exactly one symbol.

For each time i,square k,and symbols 0, 1, 2, …, 0≠ 1 ≠ 2 ≠ … :

(Si,k,0 v Si,k,1 v Si,k,2 v …)

  • At least one symbol in a cell

    (~Si,k,0v~Si,k,1)  (~Si,k,1v~Si,k,2)  (~Si,k,0v~Si,k,2) …

  • Never two symbols in a cell at the same time

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d9
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

g7(x): state that change can only made on the tape square on which the tape head is located.

For each i, k, and l :

(~Hi,kSi,k,l)  (Si+1,k,l)

Hi,k v ~Si,k,l v Si+1,k,l

NP-complete Problems


Sat is np complete cont d10
SAT is NP-complete (cont’d)

Proof (cont’d):

From the definition of f, f(x) is true iff T accepts x.

f(x) can be computed in polynomial time.

Thus, SAT is NP-complete.

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat is np complete
3CNF-SAT is NP-complete

First, show 3CNF-SAT is in NP.

Let  be a 3CNF expression,and

truth assignments C be a certificate for .

There is an algorithm to verify that  is true under the assignments C, by substituting the value of each literal and evaluating the expression.

This algorithm takes polynomial time of the length of .

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat is np complete1
3CNF-SAT is NP-complete

Second, show SAT ≤ 3CNF-SAT.

Let  be a Boolean expression.

We will construct a 3CNF expression f() such that f() is satisfiable iff  is satisfiable.

To createf():

(A) Create an abstract syntax tree of  so that internal nodes are logical operators ,v, ~, ,or  , and leaf nodes are literals (x or ~x).

Then, create , from the abstract syntax tree which is satisfiable iff  is satisfiable.

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat is np complete2
3CNF-SAT is NP-complete

:y1

:y2

v:y3

:y4

p

q

~s

v:y5

:y6

~s

r

q

~r

 = ((p  q)  (((~s v r)  (q  ~r)) v ~s)

 = y1  (y1  (y2  y3))

 (y2  (p  q ))

 (y3  (y4 v~s))

 (y4  (y5  y6))

 (y5  (~s vr ))

 (y6  (q  ~r))

 is satisfiable iff  is satisfiable.

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat is np complete3
3CNF-SAT is NP-complete

(B) Convert  into CNF.

P  Q is transformed to (P  Q)  (Q  P).

P  Q is transformed to ~P v Q.

~(P v Q) is transformed to ~P  ~Q.

~(P  Q) is transformed to ~P v ~Q.

 = (y1  (y2  y3)) =(y1  (y2  y3))  ((y2  y3)  y1)

=(~y1 v (y2  y3))  (~y2 v ~y3 v y1)

= (~y1 v y2) (~y1 v y3) (y1 v ~y2 v ~y3)

= (~y1 v y2 v y3)  (~y1 v y2 v ~y3) (~y1 v y2 v y3)

 (~y1 v ~y2 v y3) (y1 v ~y2 v ~y3)

  

NP-complete Problems


3cnf sat is np complete4
3CNF-SAT is NP-complete

f() = , and f() is satisfiable iff  is satisfiable.

Next, we need to show that f is computable in polynomial time.

In step (A):

the abstract syntax tree can be created in polynomial time of the length of ,

the expression  can be created also in polynomial time of the number of node in the tree and the length of , which is also a polynomial time of the length of .

In step (B):

 can be created, using Boolean logic identities, in polynomial time of the length of  , which is also a polynomial time of the length of .

That is, SAT ≤ 3CNF-SAT.

NP-complete Problems


Clique is np complete
CLIQUE is NP-complete

Proof:

3CNF-SAT is NP-complete.

3CNF-SAT ≤ CLIQUE.

CLIQUEis NP-complete.

NP-complete Problems


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