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1. Population Housing In cities and towns across the country, community leaders use census numbers to decide where to locate police and fire stations and other public services. The census helps local government and community organizations to locate facilities, such as day-care centers, senior citizen community centers, health-care clinics and even playgrounds Summary File – 1 The first release of Census 2000 information, the Redistricting Summary File (Public Law 94-171), provided a count of the population by race, Hispanic origin, and voting age. The next release of Census 2000 information, Summary File 1, provides additional demographic and housing detail. 2000SF1Module5_25The first release of Census 2000 information, the Redistricting Summary File (Public Law 94-171), provided a count of the population by race, Hispanic origin, and voting age. The next release of Census 2000 information, Summary File 1, provides additional demographic and housing detail. 2000SF1Module5_25

2. The Census Questionnaire 100% data or short form 7 questions Sample data or long form 34 topics The Census Bureau used two different forms to collect Census 2000 data. A short form (100% data) with seven basic questions went to all households and a long form with these same questions and additional questions went to a sample of households. Summary File 1 presents counts and basic cross-tabulations of information collected from all people and housing units. The questions asked on the short form included: name; sex; age; household relationship; Hispanic origin; race, and whether the home was owned or rented. About 83 percent of households received the short form. The information that is tabulated from the questions asked of every person and housing unit is called the100-percent or short-form data. The long-form questionnaire included the same seven population and housing questions plus additional inquiries. On average,1 in every 6 households received the long form. The information that is tabulated from the questions asked of this sample of persons and housing units is called sample or long-form data. DEFINITIONS: 100% Data - Population and housing information collected for all living quarters in the United States. Census - A complete enumeration (count) of a population or the business and commercial establishments, farms, or governments in an area. Long form - The decennial census questionnaire containing 100 percent and sample questions. Sample data - Detailed social, economic, and housing information collected on the long form from a selected portion of all housing units and people living in group quarters. The 1990 census sampled approximately 15 percent of the nation's population and 16 percent of its housing units. See 100 percent data. Short form - The decennial census questionnaire containing only the 100 percent questions. The Census Bureau used two different forms to collect Census 2000 data. A short form (100% data) with seven basic questions went to all households and a long form with these same questions and additional questions went to a sample of households. Summary File 1 presents counts and basic cross-tabulations of information collected from all people and housing units. The questions asked on the short form included: name; sex; age; household relationship; Hispanic origin; race, and whether the home was owned or rented. About 83 percent of households received the short form. The information that is tabulated from the questions asked of every person and housing unit is called the100-percent or short-form data. The long-form questionnaire included the same seven population and housing questions plus additional inquiries. On average,1 in every 6 households received the long form. The information that is tabulated from the questions asked of this sample of persons and housing units is called sample or long-form data. DEFINITIONS: 100% Data - Population and housing information collected for all living quarters in the United States. Census - A complete enumeration (count) of a population or the business and commercial establishments, farms, or governments in an area. Long form - The decennial census questionnaire containing 100 percent and sample questions. Sample data - Detailed social, economic, and housing information collected on the long form from a selected portion of all housing units and people living in group quarters. The 1990 census sampled approximately 15 percent of the nation's population and 16 percent of its housing units. See 100 percent data. Short form - The decennial census questionnaire containing only the 100 percent questions.

3. What Data Will Be Available? 100% data or short-form information Redistricting Summary File Summary File 1 Summary File 2 Sample data or long-form information Summary File 3 Summary File 4 Census 2000 information is released on a flow basis in a series of summary files, basically a set of predefined tables for various levels of geography. Information from the short-form questions (100% data) is released first. Short-form information is included in the Redistricting Summary File, and Summary Files 1 and 2. Summary File 3 information from the long-form (100% data plus additional questions on income, education, occupation, housing rent and value) is tabulated later in the process and will be available starting in the Summer of 2002. Summary File 4 presents data similar to the information included in Summary File 3. These data are shown down to the census tract level for 366 race, Hispanic or Latino, and American Indian and Alaska Native categories, and ancestry groups that meet a specified minimum population size requirement. SPEAKERS NOTES: (Only if asked) The sample information takes longer to process. Special coding for write-in entries (place of work, ancestry, occupation) is required. Therefore Summary File 3 and 4 will not be available until Summer of 2002.Census 2000 information is released on a flow basis in a series of summary files, basically a set of predefined tables for various levels of geography. Information from the short-form questions (100% data) is released first. Short-form information is included in the Redistricting Summary File, and Summary Files 1 and 2. Summary File 3 information from the long-form (100% data plus additional questions on income, education, occupation, housing rent and value) is tabulated later in the process and will be available starting in the Summer of 2002. Summary File 4 presents data similar to the information included in Summary File 3. These data are shown down to the census tract level for 366 race, Hispanic or Latino, and American Indian and Alaska Native categories, and ancestry groups that meet a specified minimum population size requirement. SPEAKERS NOTES: (Only if asked) The sample information takes longer to process. Special coding for write-in entries (place of work, ancestry, occupation) is required. Therefore Summary File 3 and 4 will not be available until Summer of 2002.

4. Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100 percent or short-form data Population Housing Counts, characteristics, and cross-tabulations State files released on a flow basis National files Summary File 1 (SF1) contains 100-percent population and housing characteristics and presents counts and basic cross-tabulations of information collected from all people and housing units. In addition, SF 1 will contain counts, that is, totals, for 63 race groups (all combinations of White, Black or African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, and Some Other Race), as well as the total number of Hispanics/Latinos down to the block level; counts of the number of persons in more detailed race and Hispanic categories (selected American Indian tribes, Chinese, Japanese, or Costa Rican, for example) are available at the census tract level. [The Census Bureau releases this information at the census tract level, rather than at the block level to protect the confidentiality of individual responses. ] State files are released on a flow basis. National files provide tabulations for the entire United States. Urban and rural areas will not be available until 2002. SPEAKERS NOTES: Summary File 1 presents 100-percent population and housing figures for the total population, for 63 race categories, and for many other race and Hispanic or Latino categories. The data are available for the U.S., regions, divisions, states, counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts, block groups, blocks, metropolitan areas, American Indian and Alaska Native areas, tribal subdivisions, Hawaiian home lands, congressional districts, and ZIP Code Tabulation Areas. Summary File 2 presents data similar to the information included in Summary File 1. These data are shown down to the census tract level for 250 race, Hispanic and American Indian and Alaska Native tribe categories that meet a specified minimum population size requirement.Summary File 1 (SF1) contains 100-percent population and housing characteristics and presents counts and basic cross-tabulations of information collected from all people and housing units. In addition, SF 1 will contain counts, that is, totals, for 63 race groups (all combinations of White, Black or African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, and Some Other Race), as well as the total number of Hispanics/Latinos down to the block level; counts of the number of persons in more detailed race and Hispanic categories (selected American Indian tribes, Chinese, Japanese, or Costa Rican, for example) are available at the census tract level. [The Census Bureau releases this information at the census tract level, rather than at the block level to protect the confidentiality of individual responses. ] State files are released on a flow basis. National files provide tabulations for the entire United States. Urban and rural areas will not be available until 2002. SPEAKERS NOTES: Summary File 1 presents 100-percent population and housing figures for the total population, for 63 race categories, and for many other race and Hispanic or Latino categories. The data are available for the U.S., regions, divisions, states, counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts, block groups, blocks, metropolitan areas, American Indian and Alaska Native areas, tribal subdivisions, Hawaiian home lands, congressional districts, and ZIP Code Tabulation Areas. Summary File 2 presents data similar to the information included in Summary File 1. These data are shown down to the census tract level for 250 race, Hispanic and American Indian and Alaska Native tribe categories that meet a specified minimum population size requirement.

5. Subject Content 171 Population tables (P) at the block level 56 Housing tables (H) at the block level 59 Population tables (PCT) at the census tract level Summary File 1 (SF 1) contains the 100-percent data, which is the information compiled from the questions asked of all people and about every housing unit. Population items include sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino, household relationship, and group quarters. Housing items include occupancy status, vacancy status, and tenure (owner occupied or renter occupied). There is a total of 171 population tables (identified with a “P”) and 56 housing tables (identified with an “H”) shown down to the block level, and 59 population tables shown down to the census tract level (identified with a “PCT”) for a total of 286 tables. There are 14 population tables and 4 housing tables shown down to the block level, and 4 population tables shown down to the census tract level that are repeated by the 6 major race categories (White; Black or African American; American Indian or Alaska Native; Asian; Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; and Some Other Race), and Hispanic or Latino. SF 1 includes population and housing characteristics for the total population, population totals for an extensive list of race (American Indian and Alaska Native categories, Asian, and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander) and Hispanic or Latino groups, and population and housing characteristics for a limited list of race and Hispanic or Latino groups. Speakers Notes: Population and housing items may be cross tabulated. Information can be can be downloaded, sorted and filtered to accommodate the needs of individual users. Note: As part of Federal guidelines on collecting and presenting data on race, the Federal Office of Management and Budget requires agencies to use a minimum of five categories; White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. The Census Bureau, with OMB approval, included Some Other Race as a sixth race category on the Census 2000 questionnaire.Summary File 1 (SF 1) contains the 100-percent data, which is the information compiled from the questions asked of all people and about every housing unit. Population items include sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino, household relationship, and group quarters. Housing items include occupancy status, vacancy status, and tenure (owner occupied or renter occupied). There is a total of 171 population tables (identified with a “P”) and 56 housing tables (identified with an “H”) shown down to the block level, and 59 population tables shown down to the census tract level (identified with a “PCT”) for a total of 286 tables. There are 14 population tables and 4 housing tables shown down to the block level, and 4 population tables shown down to the census tract level that are repeated by the 6 major race categories (White; Black or African American; American Indian or Alaska Native; Asian; Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; and Some Other Race), and Hispanic or Latino. SF 1 includes population and housing characteristics for the total population, population totals for an extensive list of race (American Indian and Alaska Native categories, Asian, and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander) and Hispanic or Latino groups, and population and housing characteristics for a limited list of race and Hispanic or Latino groups. Speakers Notes: Population and housing items may be cross tabulated. Information can be can be downloaded, sorted and filtered to accommodate the needs of individual users. Note: As part of Federal guidelines on collecting and presenting data on race, the Federal Office of Management and Budget requires agencies to use a minimum of five categories; White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. The Census Bureau, with OMB approval, included Some Other Race as a sixth race category on the Census 2000 questionnaire.

6. Geographic Content Individual files 50 States District of Columbia Puerto Rico United States Summary File 1 (SF 1) is released as individual files on a flow basis for each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; and then for the United States as a whole, and includes summaries for states, metropolitan areas and other higher levels of geography in a single file. The tables (matrices) are identical for all files, but the geographic coverage differs. SPEAKERS NOTES: Urban and rural areas will not be available until 2002 as part of the final national file, an advance national file will be released in late 2001 that provides all SF 1 data without the urban and rural components. The Census Bureau is currently reviewing its criteria for urban/rural delineations and will be announcing the official decision in the 2nd quarter of 2002. Summary File 1 (SF 1) is released as individual files on a flow basis for each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; and then for the United States as a whole, and includes summaries for states, metropolitan areas and other higher levels of geography in a single file. The tables (matrices) are identical for all files, but the geographic coverage differs. SPEAKERS NOTES: Urban and rural areas will not be available until 2002 as part of the final national file, an advance national file will be released in late 2001 that provides all SF 1 data without the urban and rural components. The Census Bureau is currently reviewing its criteria for urban/rural delineations and will be announcing the official decision in the 2nd quarter of 2002.

7. Statistical Areas Census Tracts Cover the entire U.S. Census Blocks Smallest geographic area Census Tracts are statistical areas averaging about 4,000 people. Counties and equivalent areas are subdivided into Census Tracts. These areas remain fairly constant from census to census and are useful for a variety of applications. The smallest geographic area for which you can obtain Census 2000 data is the block. Blocks are normally bounded by streets or other prominent physical features or by the boundaries of geographic areas. They may be as small as a typical city block bounded by 4 streets or as large as over 100 square miles in some rural areas. A block averages about 100 persons each. There has been a complete renumbering of blocks across the U.S. One other major change is that the numbering has gone from a three-digit system to a four-digit system. Water bodies were also assigned block numbers in Census 2000 for the first time. SPEAKERS NOTES: Q. Are any geographic entities identified differently for Census 2000? A. Yes. • Outlying Areas are now referred to as Island Areas. • The term “Block Numbering Area” is no longer used. Census tracts cover the entire country. • In Alaska, Anchorage is now referred to as a municipality, and Juneau and Sitka are each referred to as a "city and borough", at both the county and place levels. (See the sections on Counties and Places, which also provide information about Yakutat in Alaska, as well as other entities that have changed since the 1990 census.) • The U.S. Census Bureau changed "tribal jurisdiction statistical area (TJSA)" to Oklahoma tribal statistical area (OTSA) to avoid the perception that these statistical entities might reflect any type of legal status, and "joint area" to "joint use area" to better denote the common usage of overlapping tribal lands. • Data tabulations for Census 2000 differentiate between federally recognized American Indian tribes and tribes recognized only by state governments. FOR MORE INFORMATION SEE: http://www.census.gov/geo/www/tiger/glossary.html • ZCTAs - are approximate representations of five- or three-digit U.S. Postal Service ZIP Code service areas. ZCTAs are composed of census blocks and represent the majority ZIP Code for addresses within a census block. • Places - Incorporated places are concentrations of population such as cities, that have legally prescribed boundaries, powers, and functions. Other population centers without legally defined corporate limits or corporate powers are defined by the Census Bureau in cooperation with state officials and local data users. These are called Census-Designated Places (CDP). There is no minimum population size for CDPs in 2000.Census Tracts are statistical areas averaging about 4,000 people. Counties and equivalent areas are subdivided into Census Tracts. These areas remain fairly constant from census to census and are useful for a variety of applications. The smallest geographic area for which you can obtain Census 2000 data is the block. Blocks are normally bounded by streets or other prominent physical features or by the boundaries of geographic areas. They may be as small as a typical city block bounded by 4 streets or as large as over 100 square miles in some rural areas. A block averages about 100 persons each. There has been a complete renumbering of blocks across the U.S. One other major change is that the numbering has gone from a three-digit system to a four-digit system. Water bodies were also assigned block numbers in Census 2000 for the first time. SPEAKERS NOTES: Q. Are any geographic entities identified differently for Census 2000? A. Yes. • Outlying Areas are now referred to as Island Areas. • The term “Block Numbering Area” is no longer used. Census tracts cover the entire country. • In Alaska, Anchorage is now referred to as a municipality, and Juneau and Sitka are each referred to as a "city and borough", at both the county and place levels. (See the sections on Counties and Places, which also provide information about Yakutat in Alaska, as well as other entities that have changed since the 1990 census.) • The U.S. Census Bureau changed "tribal jurisdiction statistical area (TJSA)" to Oklahoma tribal statistical area (OTSA) to avoid the perception that these statistical entities might reflect any type of legal status, and "joint area" to "joint use area" to better denote the common usage of overlapping tribal lands. • Data tabulations for Census 2000 differentiate between federally recognized American Indian tribes and tribes recognized only by state governments. FOR MORE INFORMATION SEE: http://www.census.gov/geo/www/tiger/glossary.html • ZCTAs - are approximate representations of five- or three-digit U.S. Postal Service ZIP Code service areas. ZCTAs are composed of census blocks and represent the majority ZIP Code for addresses within a census block. • Places - Incorporated places are concentrations of population such as cities, that have legally prescribed boundaries, powers, and functions. Other population centers without legally defined corporate limits or corporate powers are defined by the Census Bureau in cooperation with state officials and local data users. These are called Census-Designated Places (CDP). There is no minimum population size for CDPs in 2000.

8. Geographic Hierarchy This diagram of the Census geographic hierarchy shows how the various levels of geography nest within one another. For example, a line joining the lower-level entity place and the higher-level entity state means that a place cannot cross a state boundary; a line linking census tract and county means that a census tract cannot cross a county line; and so forth. The areas on the outside of the main middle line do not necessarily follow the same hierarchy More data are available for the larger geographic areas, such as the states and counties. Less data are available for smaller geographic units such as census tracts and blocks. This diagram of the Census geographic hierarchy shows how the various levels of geography nest within one another. For example, a line joining the lower-level entity place and the higher-level entity state means that a place cannot cross a state boundary; a line linking census tract and county means that a census tract cannot cross a county line; and so forth. The areas on the outside of the main middle line do not necessarily follow the same hierarchy More data are available for the larger geographic areas, such as the states and counties. Less data are available for smaller geographic units such as census tracts and blocks.

9. Geographic Levels - State Files Three summary level sequence charts are provided: for the state files, for the advance national file, and for the final national file. State Files: SF 1 for states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico provides data for these areas and their subareas in hierarchical sequence down to the block level (census tract level for some matrices - PCT tables). The file structure includes, but is not limited to, the geographic entities shown on the slide: state, county, county subdivision, place (or place part), census tract, block group and block. SF 1 for states also has inventory (complete) summaries for the following geographic areas; place, census tract, block group, congressional district (106th Congress), consolidated city, metropolitan area and ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA). DEFINITIONS: Hawaiian Home Lands - Areas created as a result of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920 to provide agricultural, pastoral, and residential land for native Hawaiians. New for Census 2000. American Indian Trust Land - Land held in trust by the federal government for either a tribe (tribal trust land) or an individual member of a tribe (individual trust land). Such land always is associated with a specific federally recognized reservation or tribe but may be located on or off the reservation. The Census Bureau recognizes and tabulate data separately only for off-reservation trust lands. See American Indian Reservation and Hawaiian Homelands.Three summary level sequence charts are provided: for the state files, for the advance national file, and for the final national file. State Files: SF 1 for states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico provides data for these areas and their subareas in hierarchical sequence down to the block level (census tract level for some matrices - PCT tables). The file structure includes, but is not limited to, the geographic entities shown on the slide: state, county, county subdivision, place (or place part), census tract, block group and block. SF 1 for states also has inventory (complete) summaries for the following geographic areas; place, census tract, block group, congressional district (106th Congress), consolidated city, metropolitan area and ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA). DEFINITIONS: Hawaiian Home Lands - Areas created as a result of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920 to provide agricultural, pastoral, and residential land for native Hawaiians. New for Census 2000. American Indian Trust Land - Land held in trust by the federal government for either a tribe (tribal trust land) or an individual member of a tribe (individual trust land). Such land always is associated with a specific federally recognized reservation or tribe but may be located on or off the reservation. The Census Bureau recognizes and tabulate data separately only for off-reservation trust lands. See American Indian Reservation and Hawaiian Homelands.

10. Geographic Levels - National Files SF 1 National Files provide summaries for the entire United States. The file structure includes, but is not limited to, the following geographic entities: United States; region; division; state; county; county subdivision (10,000 or more population); place (10,000 or more population); Metropolitan Statistical Area/Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA/CMSA); Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area/Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA/PMSA); Urban area (Final file only); Congressional district (106th Congress); American Indian and Alaska Native Area and Hawaiian home land; and ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA). NOTE: The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) announced revised standards for metropolitan statistical areas, and a new type of entity called a micropolitan statistical area, in the Federal Register on December 27, 2000. However, the OMB will not identify the entities that are based on the new standards and Census 2000 data until mid-2003. The Census 2000 data products present information for the metropolitan areas and central cities announced by the OMB on June 30, 1999, and therefore are in effect on Census Day, April 1, 2000; these entities reflect the 1990 metropolitan area standards. SF 1 National Files provide summaries for the entire United States. The file structure includes, but is not limited to, the following geographic entities: United States; region; division; state; county; county subdivision (10,000 or more population); place (10,000 or more population); Metropolitan Statistical Area/Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA/CMSA); Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area/Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA/PMSA); Urban area (Final file only); Congressional district (106th Congress); American Indian and Alaska Native Area and Hawaiian home land; and ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA). NOTE: The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) announced revised standards for metropolitan statistical areas, and a new type of entity called a micropolitan statistical area, in the Federal Register on December 27, 2000. However, the OMB will not identify the entities that are based on the new standards and Census 2000 data until mid-2003. The Census 2000 data products present information for the metropolitan areas and central cities announced by the OMB on June 30, 1999, and therefore are in effect on Census Day, April 1, 2000; these entities reflect the 1990 metropolitan area standards.

11. Population Subjects - Block Level Summarized to the block level Total population Repeated by Race/Hispanic Major Race Groups White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Some Other Race At the block level, there are counts for the total population and 45 tables that are tabulated for the 6 major race groups (White, Black or African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander and Some Other Race). The tables cover population and housing subjects. These tables are repeated by race, Hispanic origin and by gender. SPEAKER NOTES: As part of Federal guidelines on collecting and presenting data on race, the Federal Office of Management and Budget requires agencies to use a minimum of five categories; White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. The Census Bureau, with OMB approval, included Some Other Race as a sixth race category on the Census 2000 questionnaire. At the block level, there are counts for the total population and 45 tables that are tabulated for the 6 major race groups (White, Black or African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander and Some Other Race). The tables cover population and housing subjects. These tables are repeated by race, Hispanic origin and by gender. SPEAKER NOTES: As part of Federal guidelines on collecting and presenting data on race, the Federal Office of Management and Budget requires agencies to use a minimum of five categories; White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. The Census Bureau, with OMB approval, included Some Other Race as a sixth race category on the Census 2000 questionnaire.

12. Examples of SF1 Tabulations P1 Total population P3 Race P8 Hispanic or Latino P12 Sex by Age (5-year groupings) P14 Sex by Age for the population under 20 (single years of age) P15 Households P17 Average Household Size Here you see examples of the kinds of tabulations available in Summary File 1 (P is for population). Table P1 provides the total population count for the geographic area. Table P3 provides population counts by 63 single or multiple race categories. Table P8 shows the number of persons that indicated Hispanic or Latino origin by 7 race categories P12 shows the number of males and females in 5-year age categories (85 and over is the upper limit). Table P14 shows the number of males and females in single years of age categories, but only for the population under 20 years. P15 contains the total number of households; and P17 shows the average household size. SPEAKERS NOTES: Tables are labeled: P1, P1A, PCT1, PCT1A, H1, H11A. P = population; P1A = population repeated; PCT1 = population at tract level; PCT1A = population at tract level repeated; H1 = housing; H11A = housing repeated. Here you see examples of the kinds of tabulations available in Summary File 1 (P is for population). Table P1 provides the total population count for the geographic area. Table P3 provides population counts by 63 single or multiple race categories. Table P8 shows the number of persons that indicated Hispanic or Latino origin by 7 race categories P12 shows the number of males and females in 5-year age categories (85 and over is the upper limit). Table P14 shows the number of males and females in single years of age categories, but only for the population under 20 years. P15 contains the total number of households; and P17 shows the average household size. SPEAKERS NOTES: Tables are labeled: P1, P1A, PCT1, PCT1A, H1, H11A. P = population; P1A = population repeated; PCT1 = population at tract level; PCT1A = population at tract level repeated; H1 = housing; H11A = housing repeated.

13. Examples of SF1 Tabulations P27 - P30 — Relationship by Household Type P31 - P36 — Families P37 - P38 — Group Quarters Population The following are not all, but are additional examples of SF 1 tabulations: P27 -- P30 is a series of tabulations about relationship by household type (family, non-family, and group quarters). Households by age of householder; by presence of own children; by presence of nonrelatives, and Household type by household size. P31 -- P36 is a series of tabulations about families. the population in families; the average family size; the family type, and the age of the children in a household P37 -- P38 is a series of tables for the group quarters population, which includes the population in correctional institutions, college dormitories, military quarters, and other group quarters populations. DEFINITIONS: Family - Family. A family is a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members. The number of families is equal to the number of family households, however, the count of family members differs from the count of family household members because family household members include any non-relatives living in the household. Group quarters - As of 1983, group quarters were defined in the current population survey as noninstitutional living arrangements for groups not living in conventional housing units or groups living in housing units containing ten or more unrelated people or nine or more people unrelated to the person in charge. (Prior to 1983, group quarters included housing units containing five or more people unrelated to the person in charge.) Examples of people in group quarters include a person residing in a rooming house, in staff quarters at a hospital, or in a halfway house. Beginning in 1972, inmates of institutions have not been included in the Current Population Survey. Household - Consists of all the people who occupy a housing unit. There are two major categories of households, "family" and "nonfamily". Household, family - A family householder is a householder living with one or more people related to him or her by birth, marriage, or adoption. The householder and all people in the household related to him are family members. Household, nonfamily - A nonfamily household consists of a householder living alone (a one-person household) or where the householder shares the home exclusively with people to whom he/she is not related. The following are not all, but are additional examples of SF 1 tabulations: P27 -- P30 is a series of tabulations about relationship by household type (family, non-family, and group quarters). Households by age of householder; by presence of own children; by presence of nonrelatives, and Household type by household size. P31 -- P36 is a series of tabulations about families. the population in families; the average family size; the family type, and the age of the children in a household P37 -- P38 is a series of tables for the group quarters population, which includes the population in correctional institutions, college dormitories, military quarters, and other group quarters populations. DEFINITIONS: Family - Family. A family is a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members. The number of families is equal to the number of family households, however, the count of family members differs from the count of family household members because family household members include any non-relatives living in the household. Group quarters - As of 1983, group quarters were defined in the current population survey as noninstitutional living arrangements for groups not living in conventional housing units or groups living in housing units containing ten or more unrelated people or nine or more people unrelated to the person in charge. (Prior to 1983, group quarters included housing units containing five or more people unrelated to the person in charge.) Examples of people in group quarters include a person residing in a rooming house, in staff quarters at a hospital, or in a halfway house. Beginning in 1972, inmates of institutions have not been included in the Current Population Survey. Household - Consists of all the people who occupy a housing unit. There are two major categories of households, "family" and "nonfamily". Household, family - A family householder is a householder living with one or more people related to him or her by birth, marriage, or adoption. The householder and all people in the household related to him are family members. Household, nonfamily - A nonfamily household consists of a householder living alone (a one-person household) or where the householder shares the home exclusively with people to whom he/she is not related.

14. Housing Subjects - Block Level Presented to the block level Total population Repeated by Race and Hispanic or Latino Housing subjects are presented to the block level for the total population. There are 20 housing tables. Ten of the tables are repeated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Major Race Groups (White; Black or African American; American Indian and Alaska Native; Asian; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander; and Some Other Race) and Hispanic categories.Housing subjects are presented to the block level for the total population. There are 20 housing tables. Ten of the tables are repeated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Major Race Groups (White; Black or African American; American Indian and Alaska Native; Asian; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander; and Some Other Race) and Hispanic categories.

15. Examples of SF1 Tabulations Housing Tabulations Housing Units Occupancy Status Owner-/Renter-Occupied Tenure by Race, by Hispanic or Latino Summary File 1 has 20 tables that deal with housing items. These include: the number of housing units, whether they are vacant or occupied, and whether they are owned or rented. Owner/renter status is also cross tabulated by such topics as household type, age of householder, household size and race or Hispanic origin of the householder. Summary File 1 has 20 tables that deal with housing items. These include: the number of housing units, whether they are vacant or occupied, and whether they are owned or rented. Owner/renter status is also cross tabulated by such topics as household type, age of householder, household size and race or Hispanic origin of the householder.

16. SF1 Repeating Tabulations There are nine repeating tabulations for the population subjects. For example sex by age (Table P12) is tabulated by male and female and by age and race, in five-year groupings (5 to 9 year; 10 to 14 years, etc.). These same tables are then repeated for 9 race and Hispanic groups. White alone (Table P12A), Black or African American alone (Table P12B), American Indian and Alaska Native alone (Table P12C), Asian alone (Table P12D), Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone (Table P12E) and by Some Other Race alone (Table P12F), Two or More Races alone (Table P12G) Hispanic and not Hispanic (Table P12H), and White Alone, not Hispanic or Latino (Table P12I) Tabulation (P15) for the total number of households is also repeated by the 6 major race groups and for Hispanic and non Hispanic (P15A through P15I). The average household size (P17) is tabulated by number of persons in the household, and by the 6 major race groups (P17A through P17I). Other repeating tables are available on household relationships, families, and group quarters. There are nine repeating tabulations for the population subjects. For example sex by age (Table P12) is tabulated by male and female and by age and race, in five-year groupings (5 to 9 year; 10 to 14 years, etc.). These same tables are then repeated for 9 race and Hispanic groups. White alone (Table P12A), Black or African American alone (Table P12B), American Indian and Alaska Native alone (Table P12C), Asian alone (Table P12D), Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone (Table P12E) and by Some Other Race alone (Table P12F), Two or More Races alone (Table P12G) Hispanic and not Hispanic (Table P12H), and White Alone, not Hispanic or Latino (Table P12I) Tabulation (P15) for the total number of households is also repeated by the 6 major race groups and for Hispanic and non Hispanic (P15A through P15I). The average household size (P17) is tabulated by number of persons in the household, and by the 6 major race groups (P17A through P17I). Other repeating tables are available on household relationships, families, and group quarters.

17. Population Subjects - Tract Level Summarized to the census tract level Detailed race Detailed Hispanic/Latino Group quarters population Households While many tables are available at the block level, SF1 provides more detailed data on specific (American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, Hispanic or Latino) groups. Additional tabulations at the census tract level include single years of age data, compared to data at 5-year age groupings at the block level. Group quarters population tabulations by (single years to 99, and 100 to 110 years in 5-year groupings) age and gender are also provided in SF1. Household information is also available at the tract level. SPEAKER NOTES: Tables are labeled: P1, P1A, PCT1, PCT1A, H1, H11A. P = population; P1A = population repeated; PCT1 = population at tract level; PCT1A = population at tract level repeated; H1 = housing; H11A = housing repeated. While many tables are available at the block level, SF1 provides more detailed data on specific (American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, Hispanic or Latino) groups. Additional tabulations at the census tract level include single years of age data, compared to data at 5-year age groupings at the block level. Group quarters population tabulations by (single years to 99, and 100 to 110 years in 5-year groupings) age and gender are also provided in SF1. Household information is also available at the tract level. SPEAKER NOTES: Tables are labeled: P1, P1A, PCT1, PCT1A, H1, H11A. P = population; P1A = population repeated; PCT1 = population at tract level; PCT1A = population at tract level repeated; H1 = housing; H11A = housing repeated.

18. 36 American Indian Categories Summary File 1 contains population counts down to the tract level for 36 selected American Indian categories... Apache Delaware Potawatomi Blackfeet Houma Pueblo Cherokee Iroquois Puget Sound Salish Cheyenne Kiowa Seminole Chickasaw *Latin American Shoshone Chippewa Lumbee Sioux Choctaw Menominee Tohomo O’Odham Colville Navajo Ute Comanche Osage Yakama Cree Ottawa Yaqui Creek Paiute Yuman Crow Pima All other categories *Aztec, Inca, Mayan, etc. SPEAKER NOTES: Why does the census only list 36 categories? What about other tribes? These are the top 35 American Indian tribal groupings; and see next slide for Alaska Native tribes/tribal groupings. There was a national threshold of 7,000 established in order for data for detailed groups to be shown in Census 2000 data products. The threshold was based on 1990 census results. Many of the individual American Indian and Alaska Native tribes will not meet this threshold, so in an effort to provide some data by tribes census used the tribal group in concept that was used in the 1990 census. Persons reporting other tribes are included in “All other categories” in Summary File 1. Additional detailed data will be available in a separate report on American Indians that will be released later. Summary File 1 contains population counts down to the tract level for 36 selected American Indian categories... Apache Delaware Potawatomi Blackfeet Houma Pueblo Cherokee Iroquois Puget Sound Salish Cheyenne Kiowa Seminole Chickasaw *Latin American Shoshone Chippewa Lumbee Sioux Choctaw Menominee Tohomo O’Odham Colville Navajo Ute Comanche Osage Yakama Cree Ottawa Yaqui Creek Paiute Yuman Crow Pima All other categories *Aztec, Inca, Mayan, etc. SPEAKER NOTES: Why does the census only list 36 categories? What about other tribes? These are the top 35 American Indian tribal groupings; and see next slide for Alaska Native tribes/tribal groupings. There was a national threshold of 7,000 established in order for data for detailed groups to be shown in Census 2000 data products. The threshold was based on 1990 census results. Many of the individual American Indian and Alaska Native tribes will not meet this threshold, so in an effort to provide some data by tribes census used the tribal group in concept that was used in the 1990 census. Persons reporting other tribes are included in “All other categories” in Summary File 1. Additional detailed data will be available in a separate report on American Indians that will be released later.

19. 5 Alaska Native Categories ...and a population count for 5 selected Alaska Native categories... Alaska Athabaskan Aleut Eskimo Tlingit-Haida All other tribes SPEAKER NOTES: Why does the census only list 4 categories? What about other tribes? These are the top 4 Alaska Native tribes/tribal groupings. There was a national threshold of 7,000 established in order for data for detailed groups to be shown in Census 2000 data products. The threshold was based on 1990 census results. Many of the individual American Indian and Alaska Native tribes will not meet this threshold, so in an effort to provide some data by tribes census used the tribal group in concept that was used in the 1990 census. Persons reporting other tribes are included in “All other tribes” in Summary File 1. Additional detailed data will be available in a separate report that will be released later. ...and a population count for 5 selected Alaska Native categories... Alaska Athabaskan Aleut Eskimo Tlingit-Haida All other tribes SPEAKER NOTES: Why does the census only list 4 categories? What about other tribes? These are the top 4 Alaska Native tribes/tribal groupings. There was a national threshold of 7,000 established in order for data for detailed groups to be shown in Census 2000 data products. The threshold was based on 1990 census results. Many of the individual American Indian and Alaska Native tribes will not meet this threshold, so in an effort to provide some data by tribes census used the tribal group in concept that was used in the 1990 census. Persons reporting other tribes are included in “All other tribes” in Summary File 1. Additional detailed data will be available in a separate report that will be released later.

20. 17 Detailed Asian Categories: ...as well as a population count for the 17 detailed Asian categories. Asian Indian Laotian Bangladeshi Malaysian Cambodian Pakistani Chinese, except Taiwanese Sri Lankan Filipino Taiwanese Hmong Thai Indonesian Vietnamese Japanese Other Asian Korean SPEAKERS NOTES: Where am I if not listed? You are in “Other Asian”. ...as well as a population count for the 17 detailed Asian categories. Asian Indian Laotian Bangladeshi Malaysian Cambodian Pakistani Chinese, except Taiwanese Sri Lankan Filipino Taiwanese Hmong Thai Indonesian Vietnamese Japanese Other Asian Korean SPEAKERS NOTES: Where am I if not listed? You are in “Other Asian”.

21. 12 Detailed Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Categories: Summary File 1 contains population counts for 12 detailed Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander categories... Polynesian: Native Hawaiian Samoan Tongan Other Polynesian Micronesian: Guamanian or Chamorro Other Micronesian Melanesian: Fijian Other Melanesian Other Pacific Islander SPEAKERS NOTES: Where am I if not listed? You are in the other category.Summary File 1 contains population counts for 12 detailed Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander categories... Polynesian: Native Hawaiian Samoan Tongan Other Polynesian Micronesian: Guamanian or Chamorro Other Micronesian Melanesian: Fijian Other Melanesian Other Pacific Islander SPEAKERS NOTES: Where am I if not listed? You are in the other category.

22. 28 Hispanic or Latino Categories and population counts for 28 Hispanic or Latino categories… Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban Dominican Republic Central American: Costa Rican Guatemalan Honduran Nicaraguan Panamanian Salvadoran Other Central Americanand population counts for 28 Hispanic or Latino categories… Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban Dominican Republic Central American: Costa Rican Guatemalan Honduran Nicaraguan Panamanian Salvadoran Other Central American

23. Group Quarters Population Institutionalized populations Correctional institutions Nursing homes Other institutions Noninstitutionalized populations College dormitories Military quarters Other noninstitutional group quarters SF 1 contains a population count for the group quarters population, including the institutionalized and the noninstitutionalized populations. The institutionalized population includes those that were in correctional institutions, nursing homes, halfway houses, juvenile training schools and other group facilities. The noninstitutionalized population includes persons living in places such as college dormitories, military quarters, military ships, religious quarters, shelters, and other noninstitutional group quarters. DEFINITIONS Group quarters - Those people residing in group quarters as of the date on which a particular survey was conducted. The Census Bureau recognizes two general categories of people in group quarters: (1) institutionalized population and (2) non-institutionalized population. The institutionalized population includes people under formally authorized supervised care or custody in institutions at the time of enumeration. Such people are classified as “patients or inmates” of an institution regardless of the availability of nursing or medical care, the length of stay, or the number of people in the institution. Generally, the institutionalized population is restricted to the institutional buildings and grounds (or must have passes or escorts to leave) and thus have limited interaction with surrounding community. Also, they are generally under the care of trained staff who have responsibility for their safekeeping and supervision. The noninstituionalized population includes all people who live in group quarters other than institutions.SF 1 contains a population count for the group quarters population, including the institutionalized and the noninstitutionalized populations. The institutionalized population includes those that were in correctional institutions, nursing homes, halfway houses, juvenile training schools and other group facilities. The noninstitutionalized population includes persons living in places such as college dormitories, military quarters, military ships, religious quarters, shelters, and other noninstitutional group quarters. DEFINITIONS Group quarters - Those people residing in group quarters as of the date on which a particular survey was conducted. The Census Bureau recognizes two general categories of people in group quarters: (1) institutionalized population and (2) non-institutionalized population. The institutionalized population includes people under formally authorized supervised care or custody in institutions at the time of enumeration. Such people are classified as “patients or inmates” of an institution regardless of the availability of nursing or medical care, the length of stay, or the number of people in the institution. Generally, the institutionalized population is restricted to the institutional buildings and grounds (or must have passes or escorts to leave) and thus have limited interaction with surrounding community. Also, they are generally under the care of trained staff who have responsibility for their safekeeping and supervision. The noninstituionalized population includes all people who live in group quarters other than institutions.

24. Group Quarters Tabulations By sex By age Under 18 years 18-64 years 65 years and over By group quarters type Correctional institution Nursing homes Other By race and Hispanic/Latino The group quarters population is tabulated by sex, age and group quarters type. Group quarters type were calculated for males and females under 18 years, from 18 years to 64 years of age, and for 65 years of age and over. This category is repeated for the 6 major race groups (White alone, Black or African American alone, American Indian and Alaska Native alone, Asian alone, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone and Some Other Race alone), and Hispanic or Latino. Now, let’s talk about data accessibility. The group quarters population is tabulated by sex, age and group quarters type. Group quarters type were calculated for males and females under 18 years, from 18 years to 64 years of age, and for 65 years of age and over. This category is repeated for the 6 major race groups (White alone, Black or African American alone, American Indian and Alaska Native alone, Asian alone, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone and Some Other Race alone), and Hispanic or Latino. Now, let’s talk about data accessibility.

25. Data Accessibility Media Type: FTP vs AFF vs CD-ROM and DVD FTP AFF CD-ROM/DVD Difficulty High Low Low Cost No No Yes User Level High All All Speed Variable Variable High Connect Issues Possible Possible Unlikely Download limits None 5 MB CD size Graphical User Interface None Yes Yes Here we see a matrix that gives the pros and cons of each method of accessing Census 2000 data. Briefly, the File Transfer Protocol method is designed solely for experienced data users who have a vast knowledge of complicated downloads involving segmented files. American FactFinder is an easy-to-use, free data tool that all users will find helpful. AFF is subject to some download limitations though. Purchasing CD-ROMs will keep users from having to be on-line to download large amounts of data. The CD-ROM has a Graphical User Interface (GUI - basically the windows usability format) with preformatted tables, in addition to the data files available in ASCII format.Here we see a matrix that gives the pros and cons of each method of accessing Census 2000 data. Briefly, the File Transfer Protocol method is designed solely for experienced data users who have a vast knowledge of complicated downloads involving segmented files. American FactFinder is an easy-to-use, free data tool that all users will find helpful. AFF is subject to some download limitations though. Purchasing CD-ROMs will keep users from having to be on-line to download large amounts of data. The CD-ROM has a Graphical User Interface (GUI - basically the windows usability format) with preformatted tables, in addition to the data files available in ASCII format.

26. File Transfer Protocol (FTP) File Transfer Protocol (FTP) For downloading complete dataset files Available at http://ftp2.census.gov Data users can find virtually everything they need off the Census Bureau’s web site, www.census.gov. There is a special site <http://ftp2.census.gov> for file transfer protocol downloading of complete data sets in ASCII comma delimited format. File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is not for the occasional user, it is also not for the novice user. There is a “read me” file that users should refer to before attempting to down load files.Data users can find virtually everything they need off the Census Bureau’s web site, www.census.gov. There is a special site <http://ftp2.census.gov> for file transfer protocol downloading of complete data sets in ASCII comma delimited format. File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is not for the occasional user, it is also not for the novice user. There is a “read me” file that users should refer to before attempting to down load files.

27. Find American FactFinder www.census.gov (click on A or American FactFinder) factfinder.census.gov The American FactFinder displays several types of tables including Quick Tables, Geographic Comparison Tables and Detailed Tables that vary in detail and their level of geography. The AFF is ideal for the casual or occasional user. The information is easy to access and quick to retrieve. You can access American FactFinder by typing in www.census.gov. Click on A for American FactFinder, click on the “Census 2000 Data Now Available” banner, or type in factfinder.census.gov. The American FactFinder displays several types of tables including Quick Tables, Geographic Comparison Tables and Detailed Tables that vary in detail and their level of geography. The AFF is ideal for the casual or occasional user. The information is easy to access and quick to retrieve. You can access American FactFinder by typing in www.census.gov. Click on A for American FactFinder, click on the “Census 2000 Data Now Available” banner, or type in factfinder.census.gov.

28. American FactFinder Quick Tables Geographic Comparison Tables Detailed Tables Available directly under “FactFinder Data Sources” at the bottom of the main page are two kinds of tables. Quick Tables give you basic information for the geographic area you select. Geographic comparison tables let you compare many of the variables for other similar areas, such as all counties within a state, all places within a state, etc. These tables can also be accessed through “Basic Facts” at the top of the page. When selecting these tables here, rather than through Basic Facts, you will have the opportunity to see data from lower geographic levels and to change quickly from one table to another without returning to the main page.Available directly under “FactFinder Data Sources” at the bottom of the main page are two kinds of tables. Quick Tables give you basic information for the geographic area you select. Geographic comparison tables let you compare many of the variables for other similar areas, such as all counties within a state, all places within a state, etc. These tables can also be accessed through “Basic Facts” at the top of the page. When selecting these tables here, rather than through Basic Facts, you will have the opportunity to see data from lower geographic levels and to change quickly from one table to another without returning to the main page.

29. CD-ROM and DVD Data provided on CD-ROM and DVD, with software to view, print, download items SF-1 data publicly accessible on www.census.gov Summary File 1 data are released first on the American FactFinder and then on CD-ROM. The Census Bureau recommends purchasing a CD-ROM if downloads larger than 3-5 megabytes of data will be needed. Summary File 1 for individual state is available on a single CD-ROM (2 discs for Texas). You can also obtain the entire file for the entire country on 20 CD-ROMs or 2 DVDs. You can purchase CD-ROMs or DVDs through our on-line catalogue, accessible from the Census Bureau’s home page, or call our Customer Services Center.Summary File 1 data are released first on the American FactFinder and then on CD-ROM. The Census Bureau recommends purchasing a CD-ROM if downloads larger than 3-5 megabytes of data will be needed. Summary File 1 for individual state is available on a single CD-ROM (2 discs for Texas). You can also obtain the entire file for the entire country on 20 CD-ROMs or 2 DVDs. You can purchase CD-ROMs or DVDs through our on-line catalogue, accessible from the Census Bureau’s home page, or call our Customer Services Center.

30. For More Information Visit the Census Bureau’s website: For more information, visit the Census Bureau’s website at http://www.census.govFor more information, visit the Census Bureau’s website at http://www.census.gov

31. For More Information Call our Customer Services Center at 301-457-4100 or email [email protected] Customer Services is open from 8:30 - 7:30 Eastern Standard Time. Call our Customer Services Center at 301-457-4100 or email [email protected] Customer Services is open from 8:30 - 7:30 Eastern Standard Time.

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