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Caralee Adams Contributing Writer , Education Week . Clearing the Hurdles: Helping Low-Income Students Get Into College. Expert Presenters : Jennifer Engle , director of higher education practice and policy, The Education Trust.

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Caralee Adams

Contributing Writer, Education Week


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Clearing the Hurdles:

Helping Low-Income Students Get Into College

Expert Presenters:

Jennifer Engle, director of higher education practice and policy, The Education Trust

Traci Kirtley, director of programming and evaluation, Admission Possible


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An on-demand archive of this webinar will be available at www.edweek.org/go/webinarin less than 24hrs.


Priced out how the wrong financial aid policies hurt low income students
Priced Out:How the Wrong Financial-Aid Policies Hurt Low-Income Students

Jennifer Engle

EdWeek Webinar

August 17, 2011


The education trust

WHAT WE DO

THE EDUCATION TRUST

WHO WE ARE

The Education Trust works for the high academic achievement of all students at all levels, pre-kindergarten through college, and forever closing the achievement gaps that separate low-income students and students of color from other youth. Our basic tenet is this — All children will learn at high levels when they are taught to high levels.

Advocacy to help schools, colleges, and communities mount campaigns to close gaps

Research and policy analysis on patterns and practices that both cause and close gaps

Technical assistance to schools, colleges, and community-based organizations to raise student achievement and close gaps


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Closing the achievement gap in America

has never been more urgent.

© 2011 The Education Trust


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Over the past 30 years, we’ve made a lot

of progress on the access side.

© 2011 The Education Trust


Immediate college going up
Immediate College-Going Up

NCES, The Digest of Education Statistics 2010, Table 209.


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College-going is up for all groups.

© 2011 The Education Trust


College going generally increasing for all income groups
College-going generally increasing for all income groups

NCES, The Condition of Education, 2011- Indicator 21: Supplemental Table A-21-1.


But poor students still go to college at lower rates than wealthy students did 30 years ago
But, poor students still go to college at lower rates than wealthy students did 30 years ago

NCES, The Condition of Education 2011. Indicator 21- Table A21-1.


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Not only are there significant gaps in college-going wealthy students did 30 years agorates, there is also the question of

access to what.

© 2011 The Education Trust


First institution type for dependent students by income quartile
First institution type for dependent students by income quartile

Low-income students are more likely to begin college at for-profits and community colleges

Source: EdTrust Analysis of BPS:04/06/09, July 2011


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And what quartileabout graduation?

© 2011 The Education Trust


Low income students complete bachelor s degrees at lower rates at 4 year institutions
Low-income students complete bachelor’s degrees at lower rates at 4-year institutions

6-year completion rates at any institution for dependent students by income quartile

Source: EdTrust Analysis of BPS:04/09, July 2011


Low completion rates for all students at community colleges
Low completion rates for all students rates at 4-year institutionsat community colleges

3 -year completion rates for dependent students by income quartile at

public 2-year institutions

Source: EdTrust Analysis of BPS:04/09, July 2011


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Add it all up... rates at 4-year institutions

© 2011 The Education Trust


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Different groups of young Americans obtain degrees at rates at 4-year institutionsvery different rates.

© 2011 The Education Trust


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Young adults from high-income families are 10 times more likely to earn bachelor’s degrees by age 24

Tom Mortenson, Bachelor’s Degree Attainment by Age 24 by Family Income Quartiles, 1970 to 2009 (Oskaloosa, IA: Postsecondary Education Opportunity, 2010). http://www.postsecondary.org/default.asp http://www.publicagenda.org/files/pdf/struggling-in-america-topline.pdf


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These rates threaten the health of our likely to earn bachelor’s degrees by age 24economy and democracy.

© 2011 The Education Trust


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If our poorest young people earned college degrees at the same rate as our wealthiest, the U.S. would already be first in the world in college attainment

Pell Institute (2011), Developing 20/20 Vision on the 2020 Degree Attainment Goal: The Threat of Income-Based Inequality in Education


The proportion of poor k 12 students has increased over time
The proportion of poor K-12 students has increased over time same rate as our wealthiest, the U.S. would already be

NCES (2011). 2010 Digest of Education Statistics. Table 44. Number and percentage of public school students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, by state: Selected years, 2000-01 through 2008-09. http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d10/tables/dt10_044.asp


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Closing achievement gaps is key. same rate as our wealthiest, the U.S. would already be

© 2011 The Education Trust


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So same rate as our wealthiest, the U.S. would already be whatcan we do about it?


College costs have increased at four times the rate of inflation
College costs have increased at four times the rate of inflation

Patrick M. Callan, “Measuring Up 2008” (San Jose, California: National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2008), 8. http://measuringup2008.highereducation.org/print/NCPPHEMUNationalRpt.pdf


Meanwhile earnings among the lowest income families has declined
Meanwhile, earnings among the lowest income families has declined

The College Board, “Trends in College Pricing 2010” (New York: College Board, 2010), 24. http://trends.collegeboard.org/downloads/College_Pricing_2010.pdf


It s not surprising then that families think college affordability is key
It’s not surprising then that families think college affordability is key

Public Agenda, “Slip Sliding AwaySurvey Results” (New York: Public Agenda, 2011), 3-5. http://www.publicagenda.org/files/pdf/struggling-in-america-topline.pdf



Federal pell grants have failed to keep pace with rising college costs
Federal Pell Grants have failed to students who need the most supportkeep pace with rising college costs

Total Cost of Attendance Covered by Maximum Pell Grant Award

Source: American Council on Education (2007). “ Status Report on the Pell Grant Program, 2007” and CRS, Federal Pell Grant Program of the Higher Education Act: Background, Recent Changes, and Current Legislative Issues, 2011.


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61% of savings from tuition tax credits go to middle- and upper-income families

Source: Trends in Student Aid 2010, The College Board


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91% of savings from tuition tax deductions go to middle- and upper-income families

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% because of rounding.

Source: Trends in Student Aid 2010, The College Board


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At the same time, states also have shifted costs onto students and diverted grant funds away from low-income students

Source: Trends in Student Aid 2010, The College Board


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State funding cuts for higher education students and diverted grant funds away from low-income students

mean families pay higher tuition

Annual Percentage Changes in State Tax Appropriations for Higher Education

Per FTE Student and in Tuition and Fees at Public Four-Year Institutions,

Constant 2009 Dollars

Source: College Board (2010). Trends in College Pricing.


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States are shifting away from students and diverted grant funds away from low-income students

need-based grant aid

Percent of state grant aid awarded based on need

Source: NASSGAP Report 2009-10: Undergraduate Grant Aid in Constant 2009 Dollars:

1999-2000 through 2009-10 (in millions of dollars).


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Colleges and universities also students and diverted grant funds away from low-income students

make inequitable choices

with their grant funds

Source: The Education Trust, Priced Out: How the Wrong Financial-Aid Policies Hurt Low-Income Students, 2011


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In 2007, four-year public and students and diverted grant funds away from low-income students

private nonprofit colleges

spent nearly $15 billion on grant aid.

Source: Education Trust analysis of NPSAS:08 using PowerStats, http://nces.ed.gov/datalab/. Results based on full-time, full-year, one-institution dependent undergraduates


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Public 4-year colleges used to spend more than twice as much on needy students

Source: Education Trust analysis of NPSAS:96 and NPSAS:08 using PowerStats, http://nces.ed.gov/datalab/. Results based on full-time, full-year, one-institution dependent undergraduates


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Private 4-year colleges now spend nearly twice as much on wealthy students

Source: Education Trust analysis of NPSAS:96 and NPSAS:08 using PowerStats, http://nces.ed.gov/datalab/. Results based on full-time, full-year, one-institution dependent undergraduates


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Low-income students must devote an amount equivalent to 72% of their family income towards college costs

Education Trust analysis of NPSAS:08 using PowerStats, http://nces.ed.gov/datalab/. Results based on full-time, full-year, one-institution dependent undergraduates



Only 8 percent of low income young adults attains a bachelor s degree by age 24
Only 8 percent of low-income young adults attains a bachelor’s degree by age 24

Tom Mortenson, Bachelor’s Degree Attainment by Age 24 by Family Income Quartiles, 1970 to 2009 (Oskaloosa, IA: Postsecondary Education Opportunity, 2010). http://www.postsecondary.org/default.asp http://www.publicagenda.org/files/pdf/struggling-in-america-topline.pdf


Contact us
Contact Us bachelor’s degree by age 24

Jennifer Engle, Director of Higher Ed Research and Policy

202.293.1217 x370

jengle@edtrust.org

www.edtrust.org

Stay connected with The Education Trust online:

www.twitter.com/edtrustwww.facebook.com/edtrust

1250 H Street N.W. Suite 700

Washington, D.C. 20005

202/293-1217


Program overview
Program Overview bachelor’s degree by age 24

Admission Possible, a non-profit organization headquartered in St. Paul, MN, provides students with five critical services:

  • ACT/SAT test preparation

  • college application assistance

  • financial aid consulting

  • guidance in the college transition

  • support toward college degree completion

    We serve students in three metro areas: Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN; Milwaukee, WI; and Omaha, NE.


Description of program

Requirements bachelor’s degree by age 24

2.0 GPA, family income below median

Meet 2x a week after school (160 hrs/yr for two years)

Provide eight hours of community service annually

Average starting ACT score in 2009-10 was 14.5 (about 10th percentile)

Junior Year

Orientation to College Process

ACT/SAT Test Prep

Campus Visits

Summer Enrichment Opportunities

Senior Year

Application Assistance

Financial Aid

Scholarship Applications

Freshman Year Transition

Description of Program


Admission possible student profile
Admission Possible Student Profile bachelor’s degree by age 24

Of the 1,600 students in the core high school program, the average family income reported by our students is approximately $25,000, more than 40% are from immigrant families, and 60% are female.

  • 31% Hmong

  • 16% African Immigrant

  • 16% African-American

  • 12% Latino/a

  • 11% Biracial/Multiracial

  • 9% White

  • 4% Asian (Non-Hmong)

  • <1% American Indian/ Alaska Native


Clearing the hurdles helping low income students get into college
Clearing the Hurdles: Helping Low-Income Students Get Into College

Barrier:  Don't have role models for college-going

Solution: Provide a caring adult in the form of an AmeriCorps "coach" and a peer group of 10-15 other college-goers.


Clearing the hurdles helping low income students get into college1
Clearing the Hurdles: Helping Low-Income Students Get Into College

Barrier:  Don't know the process

Solution: Structured curriculum with intense amount of time on task.


Clearing the hurdles helping low income students get into college2
Clearing the Hurdles: Helping Low-Income Students Get Into College

Barrier:  Test scores that don’t reflect their academic aptitude

Solution: Academic and test-taking strategies that bring up scores; and help solidifying other parts of their application to round out their picture.


Clearing the hurdles helping low income students get into college3
Clearing the Hurdles: Helping Low-Income Students Get Into College

Barrier:  Finding the resources to pay for college

Solution: Help students submit the FAFSA and find other scholarship support.


Clearing the hurdles helping low income students get into college4
Clearing the Hurdles: Helping Low-Income Students Get Into College

Barrier:  Summer “melt”

Solution: Support through the summer into fall enrollment, and on an on-going basis as they move on to college.


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Clearing the Hurdles: College

Helping Low-Income Students Get Into College

Expert Presenters:

Jennifer Engle, director of higher education practice and policy, The Education Trust

Traci Kirtley, director of programming and evaluation, Admission Possible


Slide 1

An on-demand archive of this webinar will be available at Collegewww.edweek.org/go/webinarin less than 24hrs.


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