Access to the airfield
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ACCESS TO THE AIRFIELD. All visitors to Sutton Bank Airfield should report to the Club Office. New Members should be escorted on to the airfield and receive a safety brief from the Club Duty Instructor before participating in any gliding activity.

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ACCESS TO THE AIRFIELD

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Access to the airfield

ACCESS TO THE AIRFIELD

  • All visitors to Sutton Bank Airfield should report to the Club Office.

  • New Members should be escorted on to the airfield and receive a safety brief from the Club Duty Instructor before participating in any gliding activity.

  • Hazards on the airfield include tractors, launching ropes and cables, aircraft propellers, and glider winches.


Gliding safety

GLIDING SAFETY

Discuss:

Conduct on the airfield. Who’s who?

Lookout and listen out.

Propellers

Flight logging and overdue action

Fire fighting equipment

Action in event of a crash on/off the airfield

“There is no such thing as a stupid question”


Ground operations

GROUND OPERATIONS

Yorkshire Gliding Club Ground handling brief


Parts of a glider

Parts of a Glider


Access to the airfield

By pushing backwards by hand

One person on wingtip to steer and act as pivot point

ONLYUSE ONE WINGTIP

Extra people push on leading edge near wing root

Beware of jibing control surfaces when turning through wind

Ensure tail wheel off ground when turning – use tail dolly or lifting handles Never lift by tailplane

Moving the Glider


Access to the airfield

By pulling forward by hand

One person on wingtip to steer and act as pivot point

Only use one wingtip

Use lifting handles or tail dolly

Open and hold canopy

Pull on strong points in cockpit – seat straps or front cockpit edge never the canopy frame

Moving the Glider


Access to the airfield

By pulling forward by vehicle

One person on wingtip

Experienced person in car or tractor. If using car keep window open and radio off

Use belly hook for towing

One person walking by nose to prevent over-run

Use long rope – at least half gliders wingspan

Drive at walking pace

Moving the Glider


Glider launch signals

GLIDER LAUNCH SIGNALS

  • Signal methods: Radio

    “take up slack”

    “all out”

    “STOP”


Glider launch signals1

GLIDER LAUNCH SIGNALS

  • Signal methods: BAT

    “take up slack” - Wave bat underarm

    “all out” - Wave bat over-arm

    “stop” - Bat stationary overhead


Forces acting on a glider

FORCES ACTING ON A GLIDER

  • How wing works

  • Total Reaction – LIFT and DRAG

  • Types of Drag – Zero Lift Drag and Lift Dependant Drag.

  • Glide Angle and Lift/Drag ratio.


Forces in flight lift how the wing works

Air flows faster over the top of the wing – Lower pressure and suction

Lift distribution roughly 70% from above and 30% from below

Stagnation point is where air meets the front of the wing and stops

Forces in FlightLift – How the wing works

Lower Pressure

Stagnation Point

Higher Pressure


Access to the airfield

Lift

Angle of attack

Drag

Chord line

Forces in flight

Lift and drag

Much more lift and little more drag


Forces in flight gliders

Forces in flight - gliders

  • The total reaction is the resultant of the lift and drag. In steady flight it is opposite and equal to the weight of the glider


Access to the airfield

THE FORCES BALANCE

Lift

acting at right angles to flight line

Flight line

Drag

Weight W

acting vertically downward


Forces in flight drag

Forces in FlightDrag

Lift is always developed perpendicular to the relative airflow


Access to the airfield

SOME COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS

  • DISTANCE – YGC pilots regularly travel out and back to declared destinations on trips of 200 miles or more

  • SPEED – Top speed180 mph 60 - 70 mph over long distances

  • HEIGHT – YGC record is 31000ft or 10000 metres


Soaring flight

SOARING FLIGHT

  • Ridge Lift and ridge flying.

  • Thermal lift and centering.

  • Mountain Waves. Height and Distance Records.


Access to the airfield

TYPES OF LIFT – RIDGE LIFT


Access to the airfield

TYPES OF LIFT – THERMAL LIFT


Access to the airfield

Wind

Wind

Wind

TYPES OF LIFT - WAVE

CLOUD


Gliding course

GLIDING COURSE

AIM - 5 hours flying time and 10 launches

Motor glider training included


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