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Preparing for the Kansas Social Studies Assessment Grades 6, 8 and 11. Deb Brown Social Studies Resource Specialist Shawnee Mission School District [email protected] Approved by the Board of Education December 2004. How much time are we spending teaching in the attic? Or

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Preparing for the kansas social studies assessment grades 6 8 and 11

Preparing for the Kansas Social Studies AssessmentGrades 6, 8 and 11

Deb Brown

Social Studies Resource Specialist

Shawnee Mission School District

[email protected]



How much time are we spending teaching in the attic?

Or

Are we just teaching in the basement?


Cognitive structures
Cognitive Structures

  • Future

  • Survey of Enacted Curriculum

  • Egalitarian

  • The value of knowledge is just as equal to that of application

  • What is application for one may be knowledge for another

  • Past

  • Blooms Taxonomy

  • Hierarchical

  • Application was more valuable than knowledge

  • Students had to go through continuum in order to achieve higher order thinking


Deconstructing an indicator
Deconstructing an Indicator

(K) describes the reasons for the Exoduster movement from the South to Kansas (e.g., relatively free land, symbol of Kansas as a free state, the rise of Jim Crow laws in the South, promotions of Benjamin “Pap” Singleton.

cognitive demand

main concept

embedded concepts


Deconstructing the Indicator

(A) compares characteristics of traditional, command, market, and mixed economies on the basis of property rights, factors of production and locus of economic decision making (e.g., what, how, for whom).

Indicator:

Main Concept(s): Embedded Concept(s):

Impact of economic systems; tenants of each system

APPLY (3)-evaluates-imagines-predicts-speculates-hypothesizes-generalizes-concludes-problem solves-uses

  • Owner v. worker; market policies; lotus of control;

Level of Cognitive Demand required by the Indicator: ____

What researched based classroom activities will be used to teach the cognitive demand and concept?

2

GATHER (1)

-describes

-recalls

-tells

-lists

-identifies

-defines

-recognizes

-knows

-observes

PROCESS (2)

-compares

-contrasts

-interprets

-explains how/why

-classifies

-cause/affect

-infers

-distinguishes

APPLY (3)

-evaluates

-imagines

-predicts

-speculates

-hypothesizes

-generalizes

-concludes

-problem solves

-uses

Hold a Socratic seminar debating pros and cons of each market system

What research based reading strategies can you use to teach the indicator?

Create a word wall with vocabulary terms found in reading passages related to each type of market system.

What assessment questions will you ask to see if students have mastered the cognitive demand and knowledge? Does this assessment question match the cognitive demand category?

Performance Assessment: Create political cartoons that humorously depict two of the economic systems.

Formative: which statement best exemplifies a command economy?




Flip charts continued1
Flip charts continued

  • Available for all three levels

  • Available at the ksde.org website

  • Include practice items, embedded concepts as well as item specification.


2007 2008 social studies assessment
2007-2008 Social Studies Assessment

  • Testing Window: March 17th-May 9th

  • Extended testing window for OTL on KCA (9th & 10th ): May 15

  • Gen. Ed is available on KCA and Paper Pencil

  • Results are not a part of AYP; but count for QPA

  • Remains a biennial assessment for QPA in even number years

  • This year only, the state will assess all 11th graders at the high school to establish cut scores; after this year, senior cohort, 2010.

  • Starting this year, high schools can assess freshman and sophomores to take advantage of Program Opportunity to Learn (OTL)


2007 2008 social studies assessment1
2007-2008 Social Studies Assessment

  • MC only, no performance assessment

  • 2 questions per indicator; proposed session times

    • 6th grade =48 items @ two 45 minute testing sessions

    • 8th grade = 60 [email protected] two 45 minute testing sessions

    • HS =30 items World + 30 items US @45-60 minutes each

  • Since cut scores have not been established, the KCA, may show a % correct, but not a “meaningful” score for QPA.

  • assessed items are tagged on flip charts, test specifications and standards with delta

  • Language such as best, mainly, mostly, most likely used on the assessment.

  • Use of graphic organizers, tables, charts, Venn Diagrams





While the idicator may be at the three story intellect the test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

High school will have a large number of questions that involve reading primary documents. Also heavy with graphic organizers and charts

Middle school many charts, graphic organizers.

Political cartoons have been mostly removed.


Testing what has been taught assessment levels
Testing What has been Taught--Assessment Levels: test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

6th grade

48 Item Assessment

24 Indicators Pulled from 5th/6th grade

8th grade

60 Item Assessment

30 Indicators Pulled from the 7th/8th grade

High School

30 Item World Focus Assessment

&

30 Item United States Focus Assessment

30 Indicators Pulled from a cumulative high school experience


Portions and percentages
Portions and Percentages: test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

60% History

40%Government-Civics, Geography, Economics

6th8thhigh school

35% (A) 50% (A) 65% (A)

65% (K) 50% (K) 35% (K)

(% of time we spend on the various floors of the 3-story intellect)


High school assessment
High School Assessment: test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

Part A

Part B

After 2007-08 school year, districts decide students’ OTL

World Focus

United States Focus

“End of Opportunity to Learn” without second opportunity

  • World History (7)

  • Global Geography (5)

  • Global Economics (3)

  • 30 item test; results banked until student completes part B

  • U.S. History (7)

  • Civics-Government (5)

  • U.S. economics (3)

  • 30 item test; results banked until student completes part A


Test projection for social studies
Test Projection for Social Studies test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.


Cohort year projection for social studies
Cohort Year Projection for Social Studies: test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

YES No YES No YES No YES

07-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

*11th

10th 11th*12th

9th 10th 11th 12th

9th 10th 11th*12th

9th 10th 11th 12th

9th 10th 11th*12th

* Denotes Cohort students for QPA; both parts of high school must be completed before the end of the first semester senior year.


Benchmark themes in geography
Benchmark themes in geography: test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

BM1:Geographic Tools & Location

BM2: Places and Regions

BM 3: Physical Systems (science overlap)

BM 4: Human Systems

BM 5: Interaction between Human & Physical Systems

No longer on SS

  • Assessment Information:

  • Physical Systems is assessed in science, no longer in social studies. (Oxbow lakes, Pangea, soil depositions)

  • More emphasis of geography related to historical context. How does geography influence world trade? How does locations of cultures/groups change over time? We are better served to teach geography in the context of history.


Benchmark themes in civics government
Benchmark themes in civics-government: test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

BM1: rule of law

BM2: shared ideals in society

BM3: responsibilities of leadership

BM4: citizenship/civic participation

BM5: systems of government

  • Assessment Information:

  • Middle School: Expanded in 2005 revision—local government in middle school. Roles of school boards, municipalities; Comparing how juveniles and adults are treated under the law.

  • High School: The “big ideas” regarding eminent domain, role of political parties, and core values of nations founding documents. More specific in terms of knowing the differences between NATO, UN, Red Cross, etc.


Benchmark themes for ks u s world history
Benchmark themes for KS, U.S., & world history: test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

  • Significance of important people and historical events

  • Groups of people who contributed to our heritage

  • Events & turning points

  • Students engages in historical thinking skills (primary v. secondary documents, historical thinking skills, inferred v. observed information)

  • Assessment Information:

  • Several indicators that use primary/secondary sources at every assessed level! Provide opportunities for your students to engage with 1800’2 early 1900 language of people and law (involuntary servitude; perverted government; trespassing; legal use of passage). The use of quotations, excerpts from publications, probably far outnumber the use of political cartoons or other examples of satire.


Kansas history it s the law
Kansas history--It’s the law! test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

  • 87% are teaching it in the 7th grade

  • 4% are embedding it w/U.S. History

    at the 8th grade.

  • All students are required to pass it.

9 Weeks of Kansas History

KSA 72- 1117


Economic benchmarks
Economic benchmarks: test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

BM1: limited resources require choices

BM2: market economy

BM3: local, national, and international interdependence

BM4: role of government in the economy

BM5: making effective decisions as consumer, producer, saver, investor and citizen

  • Assessment Information:

  • Economic indicators are assessed in historical context or modern day context: (factors that influence international trade – might be cast in historical context: Economic consequences of the war of 1812; or what would happen to prices if Germans boycotted Japanese products?

  • More international focus/global economic literacy than prior assessment

  • Natural fit is to teach economics integrated within the historical context. Several districts embedding econ in US and World history since economics is still an elective in most high schools.


How do we teach social studies in kansas
How do we teach social studies in Kansas? test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

Teaching Strategies

-Generating & testing hypotheses

-Cues, questions & advanced organizers

-etc

Geography:

BM/Indicators

-drought/Dust Bowl

-Soil Conservation

-migration

History:

BM/Indicators

-Alf Landon

-New Deal Programs/FDR

-“Grapes of Wrath”

Formative Summative Assessment

Essential Questions:

1.What were the causes of the Great Depression in Kansas?

2.What reforms came about during the Great Depression?

3. How do these reforms impact us today?

-KWL

-teacher observation

-journal

-short quizzes

-Unit Exam

-Research Project

-Presentation

-State assessment

Causes & Impact of the Great Depression

  • Student-Learning

  • Activities

  • 1. Opportunity cost activity

  • 2. Complete a KWL Chart

  • 3. ABC Founders Chart

Economics:

BM/Indicators

-Farm Economy

-subsidies

-supply/demand

-impact of the Dust Bowl

Civics-Government:

BM/Indicators

-social reforms

-common good

-formation of public policy

-civic responsibility


How do we teach ss continued
How do we teach SS continued… test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

  • Causes & Impact of the Great Depression

  • Essential Questions:

  • 1.What were the causes of the Great Depression in Kansas?

  • 2.What reforms came about during the Great Depression?

  • 3. How do these reforms impact us today?

Economics.

Civics/government

Geography

History

BM/Indicators

  • Teaching Strategies

  • -Generating & testing hypotheses

  • -Cues, questions & advanced organizers

  • -etc


How do we teach ss continued1
How do we teach SS continued… test design takes into account that our students may be only at the first story.

Student-Learning

Activities

1. Opportunity cost activity

2. Complete a KWL Chart

3. ABC Founders Chart

Formative

and

Summative Assessment


One way to prepare students is to work through key concepts and terms using vocabulary strategies
One way to prepare students is to work through key concepts and terms using vocabulary strategies.

  • Provide a explanation

  • Student write a non-glossary/dictionary definition

  • Students determine their level of understanding

  • Students create a mental model or visual representation of the term


  • Additional terms or words that provide connection into the term

  • Students are provided an opportunity to dialogue about the content

  • Teacher connects the content in later instruction

  • Review is provided through a game, simulation, discussion

  • Based on the work of Robert Marzano and Debra Pickering


Definition: The migration of African Americans to Kansas from the deep south during Reconstruction

Draw

Words to help me

Bible/Exodus

Freedom

Pap Singleton


Term pap singleton my understanding 1 2 3 4
Term: Pap Singleton termmy understanding: 1 2 3 4

Definition: Promoter who encouraged African Americans to migrate to Kansas

Draw

Words to help me

Exodusters

Real-estate

New opportunity


7.4.4.2▲ (K) describes the development of Populism in Kansas (e.g., disillusionment with big Eastern business, railroads, government corruption, high debts, and low prices for farmers).

8. In the 1880s, one major reason Kansas farmers supported the Populist movement was because they were upset about increasing

A) monetary inflation.

B) regulation of international trade.

C) railroad shipping costs.

D) government control of big business.


SS.HS.4C.1.7(K) describe why East Asia withdrew into isolationism during a time of European expansion (e.g. Tokugawa Shogunate, end of Great Ming Naval Expeditions)

In fifteenth-century China, wars, economic crises, construction projects, and inefficient government

caused the end of the

A) Manchu dynasty.

B) Portuguese rule of Macau.

C) building of the Great Wall.

D) Great Ming Naval Expeditions.


SS.6.3.2.3(K) Identifies and describes the location, landscape, climate, and resources of early world civilizations (e.g. Mesopotamia, Egypt, India,

8. The ancient civilization of Mesopotamia was located

A) in the Nile River valley.

B) on the Arabian Peninsula.

C) in the Fertile Crescent.

D) on the Indian Subcontinent.


Deb Brown landscape, climate, and resources of early world civilizations (e.g. Mesopotamia, Egypt, India,

Social Studies Resource Specialist K-12

Shawnee Mission School District

4401 West 103rd Street

Shawnee Mission, KS. 66207

913/993-8664

[email protected]


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