Gr 9 visual arts curriculum
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Gr. 9 Visual Arts Curriculum. BY: ARAL BELIR PROF. DAPHNE HEYWOOD CTL1000. The Ontario Curriculum.

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Gr. 9 Visual Arts Curriculum

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Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

Gr. 9 Visual Arts Curriculum

BY: ARAL BELIR

PROF. DAPHNE HEYWOOD

CTL1000


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

The Ontario Curriculum

  • “Since artistic activities involve intense engagement, students experience a sense of wonder and joy when learning through the arts, which can motivate them to participate more fully in cultural life and in other educational opportunities.” (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 5)

  • “Arts education prepares students for the fast-paced changes and the creative economy of the twenty-first century. Learning through the arts develops many skills,

  • abilities, and attitudes that are critical in the workplace.” (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 6)


Course description

Course Description

“This course is exploratory in nature, offering an overview of visual arts as a foundation for further study. Students will become familiar with the elements and principles of design and the expressive qualities of various materials by using a range of media, processes, techniques, and styles. Students will use the creative and critical analysis processes and will interpret art within a personal, contemporary, and historical context.”

Ministry of Education – Course Descriptions

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/memos/noember09/CourseDescriptionsGr9to12Arts.pdf


The value of the art curriculum

The Value of the Art Curriculum

  • Fosters creativity and imagination

  • Supports aesthetic judgment, artistic skills and appreciation

  • Promotes self-awareness and self-development

  • Builds an appreciation for different cultures and encourages respect different identities

    (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 5)


The value of the art curriculum continued

The Value of the Art Curriculum Continued

  • Cultivates intellectual, emotional, social and physical development

  • Help students’ understanding in other courses; such as social, cultural and historical events in social science courses

  • Encourages problem solving, critical thinking and cognitive development

    (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 6)


Overview of the art curriculum

Overview of the Art Curriculum

  • Students complete studio work, through various art tools, medium and techniques; this includes, media, processes, traditional methods and advanced technology

  • Students are able to build a theoretical, historical and cultural understanding; in order, to appreciate different methods of artistic expression

    Students are able to:

  • Convert thoughts, ideas and realities into symbols and images

  • Express their imagination to communicate their findings, feelings and analysis

  • Experiment with different elements; such as, colour, form, line, shape, space, texture and value

  • Apply aspects of design; such as, balance, contrast, emphasis, harmony, movement and proportion

  • (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 119)


The three strands of the art curriculum

The Three Strands of the Art Curriculum

Creating and Presenting

  • Students apply their critical thinking and creativity to produce and present artwork.

  • Students keep a portfolio of artwork, to document and reflect on their tasks

    Reflecting, Responding and Analyzing

  • Students continuously assess their artwork and that of others, based on a set of criteria

  • Students reflect on personal values, in order to understand themselves better, whilst analyzing the values of the past and present day society

    Foundations

  • Students build on their vocabulary related to conventions, techniques and processes, in order to describe and evaluate art work

  • Students are prompted to pay attention to health and safety practices within the classroom, whilst protecting the environment and world around them

  • (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 120-121)


The achievement chart

The Achievement Chart

  • Provides the structure for curriculum expectations

  • Directs assessment strategies

  • Guides the teachers’ daily lesson plans

  • Is the foundation for meaningful feedback

    Includes 4 main categories:

    1. Knowledge - includes facts, definitions, techniques, conventions, etc.

    Understanding -includes concepts, ideas, procedures, opinions, etc.

    2. Thinking - includes planning, asking questions, analyzing, evaluating, creative thinking, metacognition, etc.

    3. Communication – includes expressing ideas, judgments and thoughts

    4. Application- includes expressing skills, transferring knowledge and making connections

    (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 23-28)


Assessment and evaluation

Assessment and Evaluation

  • Follows Growing Success set out by the Ministry of Education

  • Relates directly to the curriculum expectations and learning goals, whilst meeting the needs, learning styles and interests of the student

  • The goal is to improve student learning through practice and procedures that are equitable

  • Provides ample chances for practice and demonstrate their learning, to ensure improvement

  • Allows students to set out goal, plan and assess their learning

  • Ensures teachers are providing descriptive feedback that is meaningful and valuable

    Content Standards

  • Part of the overall and specific expectations of the course

    Performance Standards

  • Part of the achievement chart, which sets out expectations when assessing and evaluating student learning

    Overall and Specific Expectations

  • The teacher decides which specific expectations to implement and evaluate, in light of the overall expectations

  • (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 23-28)


The creative process

The Creative Process

(Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 16)


The critical analysis process

The Critical Analysis Process

Students learn to:

  • Question and evaluate

  • Make judgments, connections and interpretations

  • Be open minded and accepting of other way of thinking and expression

  • Understand that art is a reflection of social, historical, cultural and personal contexts

  • Appreciate, react and make aesthetic judgements

    (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 18-22)


The roles and responsibilities of the teacher

The Roles and Responsibilities of the Teacher

  • Apply various strategies and techniques to meet the needs of various students – Including the implementation of IEPs

  • Help students develop critical thinking, creativity, problem solving, and communication skills

  • Promote hands-on risk taking – experiential learning

  • Assess and evaluate student learning – continuous formative feedback

  • Encourage and motivate students by making art meaningful

  • Assist students in understanding the relationship of the curriculum to social, environmental and economic situations, to ensure they civic contributing citizens

  • (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 8-9)


The roles and responsibilities of the student

The Roles and Responsibilities of the Student

The Roles and Responsibilities of the Student

1. Works Independently

  • follows instructions

  • regularly completes assignments on time and with care

    2. Team Work

  • works willingly and cooperatively with others

  • contributes information and ideas to solve problems and make decisions

    3. Organization

  • follows specific steps to reach goals or make improvements

  • manages and uses time effectively and creatively


The roles and responsibilities of the student continued

The Roles and Responsibilities of the Student Continued

4. Work Habits/Homework

  • puts forth consistent effort

  • applies effective study practices

  • monitors their learning process while self-assessing themselves

    5. Initiative

  • responds to challenges and takes risks

  • seeks out new opportunities for learning

  • extends their learning outside of the classroom – into the school and community

  • needs continuous practice in order to develop skills

  • (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 7)


The roles and responsibilities of parents

The Roles and Responsibilities of Parents

  • Supports their child’s learning, as it helps student development

  • Becomes familiar with the curriculum, in order to understand the significance of the course material

  • Is present at parent teacher interviews to show support

  • Attends art presentations/clubs/exhibits/field trips , to show their dedication

    (Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 8)


Safety cleanliness in the art classroom

“In planning learning activities to help students achieve the arts curriculum expectations,

teachers need to ensure that students have opportunities to consider health and safety issues.”

(Ontario Curriculum 2010: The Arts, Gr. 9 – pg. 23-28)

These are the rules I and my students have set out for our art classrooms:

1. CLOSELY FOLLOW CLASSROOM INSTRUCTIONS; YOU ARE AT A WORKSHOP WHERE ATTENTIVE LISTENING AND COOPERATION IS VERY IMPORTANT.

2. BRING YOUR OWN ART CLOTHING, WHICH IS STRICTLY USED IN THE ART CLASSOOM. YOUR UNIFORM WILL GET DIRTY AND PAINT WILL NOT COME OFF IT, NO MATTER HOW MANY TIMES YOU WASH IT!!

3. SAFETY COMES FIRST!! PLEASE KEEP SHARP TOOLS (SUCH AS SCISSORS, CARVING TOOLS, ETC.) AWAY FROM YOUR FACE. YOU MUST WEAR SAFETY GLASSES AND WORKING GLOVES WHEN ASKED.

4. PLEASE BE PATIENT AND WAIT FOR YOUR TURN. THE TEACHER WILL COME AROUND AND HELP YOU ONE BY ONE. DO NOT GET OUT OF YOUR SEAT; PUT UP YOUR HAND IF YOU HAVE A QUESTION.

5. SPRAY YOUR TABLE DOWN WITH THE CLEANING PRODUCT PROVIDED AND WIPE IT DOWN CLEAN.

6. ALL WASTE MUST BE THROWN INTO THE GARBAGE BIN.

7. YOU MUST LEAVE THE CLASSROOM SPIC AND SPAN!

  • WE ARE WORKING AS A TEAM, AND THEREFORE WE ARE CONSIDERED AS ONE.

  • CLEANLINESS IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT RULES IN THE ART CLASSROOM.

    PLEASE FOLLOW ALL OF THE RULES! THE ARTROOM IS A SERIOUS ENVIRONMENT, WHERE SAFETY, CLEANLINESS AND RESPONSIBILITY COMES FIRST.

Safety & Cleanliness in the Art Classroom


The arts curriculum and environmental education

The Arts Curriculum and Environmental Education

  • “Ontario’s education system will prepare students with the knowledge, skills, perspectives, and practices they need to be environmentally responsible citizens.”

  • (Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow: A Policy Framework for Environmental Education in Ontario Schools (2009), p. 6)

  • The goal is to make students aware of environmental issues and solutions

  • In art class, students are connected to the environment, landscapes and the natural world as a whole

  • Students can explore social and political issues related to the environment

  • Students become aware of hazardous substances and its effects on the environment


Key foundational figure john dewey

Key Foundational Figure: John Dewey

  • “Dewey believed that arts education was a foundational part of the curriculum because it developed creativity, self-expression, and an appreciation of the expression of others”

    (Dewey 1919; Dewey 1934 – From Dewey to No Child Left Behind :The Evolution and Devolution of Public Arts Education by Julian Vasquez Heilig, Heather Cole, and Angelica Aguilar)

  • “John Dewey believed every person is capable of being an artist, living an artful life of social interaction that benefits and thereby beautifies the world.”

    Ministry of Education – Course Descriptions

    http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/memos/november09/CourseDescriptionsGr9to12Arts.pdf


Key foundational figure john dewey1

Key Foundational Figure: John Dewey

  • “…a work of art develops and accentuates what is characteristically valuable in things of everyday enjoyment.” ― John Dewey

  • “Art is the most effective mode of communications that exists.” ― John Dewey

    (Art as Experience by John Dewey in John Dewey and the Materialism of Art Education by David S. Manzella)

  • “Give the pupils something to do, not something to learn; and the doing is of such a nature as to demand thinking; learning naturally results.” ― John Dewey

    (Good Reads http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/42738.John_Dewey)


Overview of my gr 9 art class

OVERVIEW OF MY GR. 9 ART CLASS

  • Students achieved their utmost potential through the use of challenging mediums, such acrylic paints, water colours, gouche, pastels, wax, clay, Papier-mâché, Japanese glass seed beads, charcoal, art pencils and pine wood.

  • In my class,students enjoyed Art, as it provided them with a forum for safe expression, imagination, exploration, communication and exchange of cultural and historical understanding.As scientific research reveals, Art classes strengthen the student’s ability to solve problems, whilst applying their critical thinking skills.


Overview of my gr 9 art class1

OVERVIEW OF MY GR. 9 ART CLASS

  • Moreover, art classes helps students with the development of their cognitive and creative skills, which in turn allows them to further succeed in their academic studies.

  • Allowing students to take Art, increases their motivation to come to school, whilst providing a balance in their educational experience.

  • By and large, students diligently covered famous artists, such as Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet, Andy Warhol, Salvador Dali and Leonardo Da Vinci.

  • They also learned about ancient art related to the Stone Age and Egyptian Hieroglyphics. Moreover, they covered theory related to Motivated Art, Unmotivated Art and the meaning of ‘What is Art?’


Overview of my gr 9 art class2

OVERVIEW OF MY GR. 9 ART CLASS

  • Overall, through Art class, I not only thought students to respect and show tolerance towards multicultural differences, but also to celebrate diversity and be more open minded.

  • Due to the nature of Art class, students learned that collaboration is key to success, which in turn further helped them with their communication, complex problem solving and leadership skills.

  • Utmost importantly, through regular participation in Art class, students learned how to regulate their self-confidence and self-discipline.

  • Through the recommendations and guidance of the Art teacher, they learned how to be persistent in achieving high quality work via revision and application of special techniques.By: Aral– Art Teacher


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

SKETCHES completed by my students!


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

MOSAICS completed by my students!


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

PYROGRAPHY completed by my students!


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

PAINTINGS completed by my students!


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

ABORIGINAL BEADWORK completed by student!


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

WAX ART completed by my students!


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

ARTIST SERIES PUZZLES completed by my students!


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

CANVAS PAINTINGS completed by my students!


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

3D PROJECTS completed by my students!


Lets watch a clip about the importance of art education

Lets watch a clip about the importance of art education!

Arts & the Mind: Arts in Education

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41nVnLm7EZU


References books i signed out from oise library

References – Books I signed out from OISE library

Glatthorn, Allan A., 1924- Curriculum leadership: strategies for development and implementation (375.001 G549C 2009)

Nauman, Ann K. (Ann Keith) Curriculum development: perspectives from around the world (375.001 C97698)

Oliva, Peter F. Developing the curriculum (375.001 O48D 2013)

Ornstein, Allan C. Curriculum: foundations, principles, and issues (375.001 o74C 2004)

Ornstein, Allan C. Contemporary issues in curriculum (375.001 C761 2011)


References online documents and articles

References- Online Documents and Articles

Course Profiles – http://csc.immix.ca/storage/126/1284483003/1POVIAR.pdf

Dewey to No Child Left Behind: The Evolution and Devolution of Public Arts Education by Julian Vasquez Heilig, Heather Cole, and Angelica Aguilar http://ows.edb.utexas.edu/sites/default/files/users/jvh/From%20Dewey%20to%20No%20Child%20Left%20Behind-%20The%20Evolution%20and%20Devolution%20of%20Public%20Arts%20Education.%20Arts%20Education%20Policy%20Review.pdf

Education and Culture: The journal of the John Dewey Societyhttp://docs.lib.purdue.edu/eandc/vol22/iss1/art4/

Ontario Ministry of Education (2010) The Ontario Curriculum – Grades 9 and 10:The Artshttp://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/arts910curr2010.pdf

Ontario Ministry of Education – Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow: A Policy Framework for Environmental Education in Ontario Schools (2009) http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teachers/enviroed/action.html

Ontario Ministry of Education – Course Descriptions

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/memos/november09/CourseDescriptionsGr9to12Arts.pdf

Ontario Ministry of Education (EDU) – curriculum documents pagehttp://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/document/curricul/curricul.html

JSTOR, John Dewey and the Materialism of Art Education by David S. Manzella

http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/774316?uid=2&uid=4&sid=21102830972021

Vaughan Secondary School - York Region District School Board, http://www.vaughan.ss.yrdsb.edu.on.ca/visualarts/2011-12%20course%20outlines/9%20art%20course%20outline%202009-10.pdf


References images

References - Images

Art as a Witness http://devozine.upperroom.org/creative-work/art-as-a-witness/

Art Absorption – Lessons http://megankounnas.wordpress.com/about/student-painting-3/

American Creativity Association http://www.aca.cloverpad.org/

Carbonun covered http://carbonuncovered.wordpress.com/

Contemporary to the traditional Emerging Canadian artists

http://www.chictip.com/art/modern-artist-leonid-afremov

Creative Art – All Wall Papers Collection http://www.allwallsinfo.com/2013/01/23/creative-art/

Huatulco Lifehttp://huatulcolife.blogspot.ca/2011/05/oaxaca-committed-to-environment.html

John Dewey Quote http://izquotes.com/quote/50088

Leonid Afremov Art Work http://www.ursispaltenstein.ch/blog/weblog.php?/weblog/comments/5365/

Person Library http://www.piersonlibrary.org/719/thank-you-for-all-your-donations/

Recruiting Realities http://recruitingrealities.com/sports-parents/

Seattle University – Collage of Arts and Sciences http://www.seattleu.edu/artsci/about/liberal-arts/

St. Marks School http://www.stmarksschool.org/academics/arts/visual-arts/index.aspx

Think Safety First Label http://www.onlinelabels.com/Templates/OL175-Think-Safety-First-Label.htm

University of Nebraska – Art Education MA Ed http://onlineworldwide.nebraska.edu/Degree-Programs/Masters-Degrees/Art-Education-Masters.aspx


Gr 9 visual arts curriculum

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