Using Growth Models to Monitor School Performance Over Time: Comparing NCE, Scale and Scores on NRTs...
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 22

American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting March, 2008 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 69 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Using Growth Models to Monitor School Performance Over Time: Comparing NCE, Scale and Scores on NRTs and SBTs. Pete Goldschmidt, Kilchan Choi, Felipe Martinez, and John Novak. American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting March, 2008. Introduction.

Download Presentation

American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting March, 2008

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Using Growth Models to Monitor School Performance Over Time: Comparing NCE, Scale and Scores on NRTs and SBTs

Pete Goldschmidt, Kilchan Choi, Felipe Martinez, and John Novak

American Educational Research AssociationAnnual Meeting

March, 2008


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Introduction

Using Growth Model Value Added estimates, do inferences about school change

Examine the role of the metric

NCE vs Scale Scores on a Vertically equated assessment.

Examine the role of switching Assessment type NRT vs SBT


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

4

Summary Parameter Estimates Compared

Estimated Initial Status

Residual Initial Status

Estimated Growth

Value Added


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

5

Summary of Estimates Compared Using Rank Order Correlations

Also compare school ranks based on the residual Initial Status and Value Added estimates


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

6

Summary of Results Describing SAT-9 Reading Achievement


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

8

Correlations Between Value added estimates for NRT for models without student covariates


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

9

Correlations Between Value added estimates for NRT for models with student covariates


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

13

Comparison of Relative Bias to the Effect Size of Growth


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Mathematics


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

School context and inferences

While individual student characteristics’ impact differ depending on assessment used (though not metric) -particularly for growth,

School enrollment characteristics have virtually no impact inferences between NRT and SBT.


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Mathematics


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Reading


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Mathematics


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Relationship between missing scores and school performance


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Relationship between missing scores and school performance


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Summary – the scale

Using a relative scale for monitoring individual achievement growth when the assessment is vertically equated – significantly under-estimates growth.

Using a relative scale for monitoring school performance based on growth when the assessment is vertically equated – yield very consistent results to using an absolute scale.

No patterns as to where deviations may occur.


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Summary – the assessment

Individual results between NRT and CST highly correlated in each year.

Individual student characteristics affect relative performance

Attempting to become more egalitarian?

School results fairly consistent in Mathematics, but not in Language Arts

School characteristics have virtually no impact on changes in inferences or rankings of schools.


American educational research association annual meeting march 2008

Summary – the method

Means highly correlated with student background

Means inversely correlated to misingness

VA added estimates based on individual growth substantively less related to student background

VA added estimates based on individual growth substantively less related to missingness


  • Login