Rhythm and meter
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Rhythm and Meter. Lesson 4. Bleezer’s Ice Cream by Jack Prelutsky. COCOA MOCHA MACARONI TAPIOCA SMOKED BALONEY CHECKERBERRY CHEDDAR CHEW CHICKEN CHERRY HONEYDEW TUTTI-FRUTTI STEWED TOMATO TUNA TACO BAKED POTATO LOBSTER LITCHI LIMA BEAN MOZZARELLA MANGOSTEEN

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Rhythm and Meter

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Rhythm and meter

Rhythm and Meter

Lesson 4


Bleezer s ice cream by jack prelutsky

Bleezer’s Ice Creamby Jack Prelutsky

COCOA MOCHA MACARONI

TAPIOCA SMOKED BALONEY

CHECKERBERRY CHEDDAR CHEW

CHICKEN CHERRY HONEYDEW

TUTTI-FRUTTI STEWED TOMATO

TUNA TACO BAKED POTATO

LOBSTER LITCHI LIMA BEAN

MOZZARELLA MANGOSTEEN

ALMOND HAM MERINGUE SALAMI

YAM ANCHOVY PRUNE PASTRAMI

SASSAFRAS SOUVLAKI HASH

SUKIYAKI SUCCOTASH

BUTTER BRICKLE PEPPER PICKLE

POMEGRANATE PUMPERNICKEL

PEACH PIMENTO PIZZA PLUM

PEANUT PUMPKIN BUBBLEGUM

BROCCOLI BANANA BLUSTER

CHOCOLATE CHOP SUEY CLUSTER

AVOCADO BRUSSELS SPROUT

PERIWINKLE SAUERKRAUT

COTTON CANDY CARROT CUSTARD

CAULIFLOWER COLA MUSTARD

ONION DUMPLING DOUBLE DIP

TURNIP TRUFFLE TRIPLE FLIP

GARLIC GUMBO GRAVY GUAVA

LENTIL LEMON LIVER LAVA

ORANGE OLIVE BAGEL BEET

WATERMELON WAFFLE WHEAT

I am Ebenezer Bleezer,

I run BLEEZER'S ICE CREAM STORE,

taste a flavor from my freezer,

you will surely ask for more.

I am Ebenezer Bleezer,

I run BLEEZER'S ICE CREAM STORE,

there are flavors in my freezer

you have never seen before,

twenty-eight divine creations

too delicious to resist,

why not do yourself a favor,

try the flavors on my list:


Rhythm and meter

“Jabberwocky” by Lewis Caroll


Jabberwocky

“Jabberwocky”

'Twasbrillig, and the slithytoves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the momerathsoutgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son

The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!

Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun

The frumiousBandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand;

Long time the manxome foe he sought—

So rested he by the Tumtum tree,

And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,

The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through

The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?

Come to my arms, my beamish boy!

O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!"

He chortled in his joy.

'Twasbrillig, and the slithytoves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the momerathsoutgrabe.

by Lewis Carroll


Background

Background

A poem’s meaning can be found in its structural, stylistic, and verbal components. Two such components are rhythm and meter, long regarded as distinguishing features of verse. Poems may be written in fixed forms— traditional verse forms that require certain predetermined structural elements of meter, rhythm, and rhyme, such as a sonnet or a ballad—or open form. Not all poets write in fixed forms or meter, but all poets employ rhythm. Rhythm is created by the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a poetic line. Scansion is the art of listening carefully to the sounds of a poem and trying to make sense of it. This includes paying attention to each poetic foot, each stressed or unstressed syllable, and—if applicable—to the poem’s rhyme scheme.

Most nineteenth-century poets, including Emily Dickinson, wrote primarily in fixed forms with identifiable meters. Dickinson drew her meter from Protestant hymns sung in the churches in Amherst, Massachusetts


Rhythm and meter

Most 19th century poets, including Emily Dickinson, wrote primarily fixed forms with identifiable meters.

Dickinson drew her meter from Protestant hymns sung in church.


Vocabulary because i could not

Vocabulary: “Because I could not…”

  • Gossamer, n. 1) an extremely delicate variety of gauze, used especially for veils 2) A cobweb

  • Tippet, n. A woman’s fur cape or woolen shawl

  • Tulle, n. Fine (often starched) net used for veils, tutus, or gowns

  • Cornice, n. An ornamental molding around the wall of a room just below the ceiling


Because i could not stop for death

“Because I could not stop for Death”

Because I could not stop for Death,He kindly stopped for me;The carriage held but just ourselvesAnd Immortality.

We slowly drove, he knew no haste, And I had put awayMy labor, and my leisure too,For his civility.

We passed the school, where children stroveAt recess, in the ring;We passed the fields of gazing grain,We passed the setting sun.

Or rather, he passed us;The dews grew quivering and chill,For only gossamer my gown,My tippet only tulle.

We paused before a house that seemedA swelling of the ground;The roof was scarcely visible,The cornice but a mound.

Since then 'tis centuries, and yet eachFeels shorter than the dayI first surmised the horses' headsWere toward eternity.

-by Emily Dickinson


Poetry rhyme and meter

Poetry, rhyme and Meter

  • Long ago people sang their poems to remember them easier—they would also have them rhyme for ease of memorizing

  • Notice the rhyme and meter of Frost’s poem:

    Whose woods these are I think I know.

    His house is in the village though

    He will not see me stopping here

    To watch his woods fill up with snow.


Poetry and rhyme

Poetry and Rhyme

  • The End Rhymes Frost used are called Perfect Rhymes: know/though

  • Much of poetry today does not rhyme perfectly

  • Thought to take the surprise and freshness out of a poem—too sing-songy, like a greeting card

  • Best rhymes sound natural: end up using slant and internal rhyme


Slant rhyme

Slant Rhyme

I heard a fly buzz when I died;

The stillness round my form

Was like the stillness in the air

Between the heaves of storm.

The eyes beside had wrung them dry,

And breaths were gathering sure

For that last onset, when the king

Be witnessed in his power.

I willed my keepsakes, signed away

What portion of me I

Could make assignable,-and then

There interposed a fly,

With blue, uncertain, stumbling buzz,

Between the light and me;

And then the windows failed, and then

I could not see to see.


Rhythm and meter1

Rhythm and Meter

  • Rhythm is the sound of stresses, or accents, that we hear in words: bum-BUM (i.e. an iamb) or to-DAY, BUM-bum (i.e. a trochee) or THUN-der, or bum-bum-BUM (i.e. anapest) or dis-a-POINT

  • Meter goes a step further: it is the pattern of rhythms

  • Meters are made when you use rhythms in certain patterns (i.e. iambic pentameter)


I ambic p entameter m eter

Iambic Pentameter Meter

Whose WOODS these ARE i THINK i KNOW

His HOUSE is IN the VILlage THOUGH

He WILL not SEE me STOPping HERE

To WATCH his WOODS fill UP with SNOW


Scansion

Scansion

  • The act of analyzing a verse’s metrical form

  • When scanning a poem, use an accent (‘) over each stressed syllable and a breve or “little round cup” (ᵕ) over each unstressed syllable.

  • How would you scan “Because I could not stop for death”?


Rhythm and meter

Try scanning your individual poem


Rhythm and meaning

Rhythm and Meaning

  • Being aware of rhythms of your words can help you write stronger—If you choose your words just right, a poem can sing, march, surprise or even laugh on the page

  • The meter chosen can have a direct impact on the tone of the poem as well—can make it feel rushed, slow, simplistic etc.


Rhythm and meter

Form

  • Some poets use forms (i.e. sonnet, villanelle, haiku, limerick) to challenge themselves

  • Forces poet to write a poem in a way that is different from their normal habit

  • Helps to discover new things about language

  • Certain forms also work well with different subject matters (loss, grief, love etc.)


Writing exercise

Writing Exercise!


Ballad form

Ballad Form

  • A ballad is a song that uses a pattern called a ballad stanza. The stanza has four lines in which the second and fourth lines share the rhyme

  • The first and the third lines do not share a rhyme with any line in that stanza.

  • Each stanza has the same rhyme pattern.

  • Each line also uses a specific amount of syllables. The first line and the third line use 8 syllables

  • The second and fourth lines use 6 syllables.

    Line 1 - 8 syllables

    The engine makes the thrust to go.

    Line 2 - 6 syllables/last word rhymes with line 4

    Wings make lift, pulling high!

    Line 3 - 8 syllables

    My fuselage is sleek and strong.

    Line 4 - 6 syllables/last word rhymes with line 2

    Rise above weight - I fly


Rhythm and meter

Take a favorite fairy tale and recast it in the form of a ballad. Your ballad should be at least six stanzas (four lines each) long.

*Though not necessarily ballads, look at these poems on fairy tales to get ideas:

  • “Cinderella” by Sylvia Plath

  • “Princess and the Pea” by Joseph Stanton


Popular fairy tales

Popular Fairy Tales:

Beauty and the Beast

Tom Thumb

Princess and the Pea

Cinderella

Rumpelstiltskin

Hansel and Gretel

Emperor’s New Clothes

Jack and the Beanstock

Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Snow White

Little Mermaid

Little Red Riding Hood

Puss in Boots

Sleeping Beauty

Three Little Pigs

Ugly Duckling

Thumbelina


Homework

Homework

  • Try scanning your poem. What kind of rhythm does it have?

  • Take a look at the sheet of sound devices. Does your poem include Repetition? Alliteration? Rhyme? If so, mark where those elements exist, and then discuss how they strengthen the tone or theme of the poem.

    To Turn In:

  • Your poem marked up, noting the use of different sound devices

  • A screen shot of the Sound Devices section of your Prezi.

  • Typed fairy tale ballad


Prezi so far stay caught up

Prezi so far…Stay Caught Up!

This is what you should have completed in your Prezi by Tuesday:

  • Poet’s bio/background

  • Slide of your poem (with recording of it being read/recited by poet)

  • Theme

  • Imagery

  • Sound Devices

  • Figurative Language (simile, metaphor, personification)


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