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Equilibrium






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I. Equilibrium . Notice that there is one point where supply and demand intersect.This is called the equilibrium pointThe price at this point is called the equilibrium priceThe quantity at this point is called the equilibrium quantity. I. Equilibrium. The dictionary defines the word equilibrium as a situation in which various forces are in balance.This also descries market equilibrium.
Equilibrium

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1. Equilibrium Supply and Demand together

2. I. Equilibrium Notice that there is one point where supply and demand intersect. This is called the equilibrium point The price at this point is called the equilibrium price The quantity at this point is called the equilibrium quantity

3. I. Equilibrium The dictionary defines the word equilibrium as a situation in which various forces are in balance. This also descries market equilibrium

4. I. Equilibrium At the equilibrium price the quantity of the good that buyers are willing and able to buy exactly balance the quantity that sellers are willing and able to sell

5. I. Equilibrium The equilibrium price is sometimes called the market clearing price Because at this price the demand for everyone in the market has been satisfied. Actions of buyers and sellers naturally move markets toward the equilibrium of supply and demand.

6. C. Markets not in equilibrium Suppose the market price is above equilibrium At this price ($2.50) the quantity of goods supplied (10) exceeds the quantity demanded (4).

7. C. Markets not in equilibrium This is referred to as being a surplus of goods Also known as a excess of supply Business respond to a surplus by cutting prices

8. C. Markets not in equilibrium Falling prices cause an increase in the quantity demanded and decreases in the quantity supplied. Price continue to fall until the market reaches equilibrium.

9. C. Markets not in equilibrium Now suppose the market price is below the equilibrium The quantity of goods demanded exceeds the quantity supplied. This is referred to as a shortage Also known as an excess of demand

10. C. Markets not in equilibrium When there is a shortage buyers have to wait in long lines for a chance to buy a few units of a good. With too many buyers chasing too few goods, sellers can respond to a shortage by raising prices without loosing sales.

11. C. Markets not in equilibrium The activities of buyers and sellers automatically push the market price toward equilibrium. How quickly equilibrium is reached varies from market to market, depending on how quickly prices adjust.

12. C. Markets not in equilibrium This phenomenon is so pervasive that it is called the law of supply and demand. The price of any good adjusts to bring the quantity supplied and quantity demanded for that good into balance

13. QuickQuiz

14. II. Three steps for analyzing changes in equilibrium The equilibrium price and quantity depend on the position of the supply and demand curves. Some events shift one of the curves, and the equilibrium in the market changes.

15. Three steps for analyzing changes in equilibrium When analyzing how some events affect a market you proceed in three steps Decide whether the event shifts the supply curve, demand curve, or perhaps both curves

16. II. Three steps for analyzing changes in equilibrium Decide which direction the curve shifts. Use the supply and demand diagram to see how the shift changes the equilibrium price and quantity.

17. III. Example: change in demand Suppose that one summer the weather is very hot. How does this event affect the market for ice cream? To answer this question, let's follow our three steps.

18. III. Example: change in demand The hot weather affects the demand curve by changing people's taste for ice cream. That is, the weather changes the amount of ice cream that people want to buy at any given price. The supply curve is unchanged because the weather does not directly affect the firms that sell ice cream.

19. III. Example: change in demand Because hot weather makes people want to eat more ice cream, the demand curve shifts to the right. The graph shows this increase in demand as the shift in the demand curve from Dl to D2. This shift indicates that the quantity of ice cream demanded is higher at every price.

20. III. Example: change in demand The graph shows, the increase in demand raises the equilibrium price from $2.00 to $2.50 and the equilibrium quantity from 7 to 10 cones. In other words, the hot weather increases the price of ice cream and the quantity of ice cream sold.

21. IV. Example: change in supply Suppose that, during another summer, a hur?ricane destroys part of the sugar cane crop and drives up the price of sugar. How does this event affect the market for ice cream? Once again, to answer this question, we follow our three steps.

22. IV. Example: change in supply The change in the price of sugar, an input into making ice cream, affects the supply curve. By raising the costs of production, it reduces the amount of ice cream that firms produce and sell at any given price. The demand curve does not change because the higher cost of inputs does not directly affect the amount of ice cream households wish to buy.

23. IV. Example: change in supply The supply curve shifts to the left because, at every price, the total amount that firms are willing and able to sell is reduced. The graph illustrates this decrease in supply as a shift in the supply curve from S1 to S2.

24. IV. Example: change in supply The graph shows, the shift in the supply curve raises the equilibrium price from $2.00 to $2.50 and lowers the equilibrium quantity from 7 to 4 cones. As a result of the sugar price increase, the price of ice cream rises, and the quantity of ice cream sold falls.

25. Example: change in both supply and demand Now suppose that the heat wave and the hurricane occur during the same summer. To analyze this combination of events, we again follow our three steps.

26. Example: change in both supply and demand We determine that both curves must shift. The hot weather affects the demand curve because it alters the amount of ice cream that households want to buy at any given price. At the same time, when the hurricane drives up sugar prices, it alters the supply curve for ice cream because it changes the amount of ice cream that firms want to sell at any given price.

27. Example: change in both supply and demand The curves shift in the same directions as they did in our previous analysis: The demand curve shifts to the right, and the supply curve shifts to the left. Our graph illustrates these shifts.

28. Example: change in both supply and demand As our graph shows, there are two possible outcomes that might result, depending on the relative size of the demand and supply shifts. In both cases, the equilibrium price rises. In panel (a), where demand increases substantially while supply falls just a little, the equilibrium quantity also rises. By contrast, in panel (b), where supply falls substantially while demand rises just a little, the equilib?rium quantity falls. Thus, these events certainly raise the price of ice cream, but their impact on the amount of ice cream sold is ambiguous (that is, it could go either way).

29. VI. Summary We have just seen three examples of how to use supply and demand curves to analyze a change in equilibrium. Whenever an event shifts the supply curve, the demand curve, or perhaps both curves, you can use these tools to predict how the event will alter the amount sold in equilibrium and the price at which the good is sold.

30. Quick reference guide

31. QuickQuiz Analyze what happens to the market for pizza if the price of tomatoes rises. Analyze what happens to the market for pizza if the price of hamburger falls


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