Money game for tween girls a game based design to support financial learning
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Money Game for Tween Girls: A Game-based design to Support Financial Learning. By WILAWAN INCHAMNAN Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Break the Ice. Wilawan Inchamnan Lecturer at Dhurakij Pundit University Interactive Design and Game Development

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Money Game for Tween Girls: A Game-based design to Support Financial Learning

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Money game for tween girls a game based design to support financial learning

Money Game for Tween Girls:A Game-based design to Support Financial Learning

By WILAWAN INCHAMNAN

Queensland University of Technology, Australia


Break the ice

Break the Ice

WilawanInchamnan

Lecturer at Dhurakij Pundit University

Interactive Design and Game Development

Student- Doctor of Information Technology

at Queensland University of Technology Australia

In Games and Interactive Entertainment

[email protected]


Introduction

Introduction

  • e-Learning in terms of financial learning

  • Why computer games are significant?

  • Money game for Tween girls

  • Learning strategies

  • Conclusion

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E learning in terms of financial learning

e-Learning in terms of financial learning

  • Interact online

  • Provide enjoyment and satisfaction

  • Are challenging and are tools for learning as e-learning

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Why computer games are significant

Why Computer games are significant?

  • Normal part of childhood in many countries

  • The negative impacts of excessive game use,

    • game addiction,

    • social isolation

    • increased violent behaviour

  • Computer game use on children’s cognitive and creative learning processes

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Why computer games are significant1

Why Computer games are significant?

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Why computer games are significant2

Why Computer games are significant?

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Why computer games are significant3

Why Computer games are significant?

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Money game for tween girls

Money game for Tween girls

  • Assist children’s financial ability

  • Manage the game’s financial resources through saving, lending and knowing

  • Assist in the development of real life skills

  • Teach the concepts of financial management

  • Link virtual world experiences with the real world banking information

  • through online learning technology

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Money game for tween girls cont

Money game for Tween girls (cont)

Pre-teens or tweens are children who are between middle childhood and adolescence, usually aged between 8 and 12 years

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Money game for tween girls cont1

Money game for Tween girls (cont)

Consequently, this project is focused on gender and the ability of a game specifically designed for females to influence players in terms of learning outcomes.

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Money game for tween girls cont2

Money game for Tween girls (cont)

To ensure the learning satisfaction of the game player, game usability evaluation procedures were implemented

GAME-BASED DESIGN

Usability is the capability of an interactive system to be used by humans easily and effectively through considering ease of use, effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction.

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Money game for tween girls cont3

Money game for Tween girls (cont)

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Learning strategies

Learning strategies

Social play

Game mechanics

Game Interface

Financial learning

Player’s emotion

Pattern of play

Game play

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Conclusion

Conclusion

  • A financial learning model

  • Usability design, game interface, game mechanics and game play

  • Users’ satisfaction in terms of financial learning through social networking, patterns of their play and their emotional connections

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Conclusion1

Conclusion

  • Game technology has the power to encourage the type of learning in which children act, interact, make decisions and learn in order to accomplish the goals.

  • Game is a new medium though e-Learning. Incorporating iterative improvements into Party Girl based on our play-testing, will result in an interactive experience that encourages both engagement and financial literacy.

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Reference

Reference

Boyatzis, C. J., M. Mallis and I. Leon.

(1999). Effects of Game Type on Children’s Gender-Based Peer Preferences: A Naturalistic Observational Study. Plenum Publishing Corporation, Sex Roles, Vol. 40, No. 1/2.

Federoff, M. (2002). Heuristics and

usability guidelines for the creation and evaluation of fun in video games. Indiana University.

Gorriz, C. M., and C. Medina. (2000). Engaging Girls with Computers through Software Games. Communications of the ACM, Vol. 43, No. 1, 42-49.

Jimison, H., M. Pavel and T. ,Le. (2008).

Home-based cognitive monitoring using embedded measures of verbal fluency in a computer word game, Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2008. 30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE , vol., no., pp.3312-3315

Isbister, K. (2009). Understand social play.

In Bateman, C., Beyond game design : nine steps toward creating better videogames (pp.49-59). Boston: Course Technology.

Karniol, R., S. Reichman and L. Fund.

(2000). Children’s Gender Orientation and Perceptions of Female, Male, and Gender-Ambiguous Animal Characters. Plenum Publishing Corporation, Sex Roles, Vol. 43, No. 5/6.

Laitinen, S. (2005). Better Games

Through Usability Evaluation and Testing, Retrieved on 10 November, 2010, from http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/2333/better_games_through_usability_.php

Lazzaro, N. (2009). Understand emotions.

In Bateman, C., Beyond game design : nine steps toward creating better videogames (pp.3-48). Boston: Course Technology.

Media Awareness Network. (2009).

Marketing and Consumerism – Special Issues for Tweens and Teens. Retrieved on 15 November, 2010, from http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/parents/marketing/issues_teens_marketing.cfm

Omar, H. and A. Jaafar. (2010). Heuristics

evaluation in computer games, Information Retrieval & Knowledge Management, (CAMP), International Conference on , vol., no., pp.188-193.

Song, M. and S. Zhang. (2008). EFM: A

Model for education game design. Edutainment, LNCS 5093, pp. 509-517.

Acknowledge: Dr Peta Wyeth

Senior Lecturer

Faculty of Science and Technology | Queensland University of Technology

Brisbane QLD Australia in reading and commenting on this paper.


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